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  1. I am Legally Blind so I have a 72 Inch DLP Projection TV.
    I want to get away from it because the Bulb only lasts One Year.

    I do not want to Buy any more Bulbs for it.

    Now I have a 32 Inch LCD TV for my Computer Monitor and yes I know this uses a Bulb to Light the LCDs but the Bulb never Burned Out yet why is that?

    LED TVs are just LCDs that use LED to Light them so I get this.

    And OLED TVs are new LCDs Made of Carbon and these Light up by them selves.

    Now they say OLED can go all the way Black by Turning off the Power the that Pix.
    But LCD TVs do not go all the way Black and LED TVs do not go all the way Black.

    So they say it make the Picture very very very good.

    So I need to know some things?

    1. Do they make OLED TVs 72 Inch?
    2. Why is the Bulb in my 32 Inch LCD TV that I use for a Computer Monitor never Burning Out I had this for 6. Years maybe more?
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    Originally Posted by biferi View Post
    1. Do they make OLED TVs 72 Inch?
    LG and Sony make 77-inch OLEDs.

    2. Why is the Bulb in my 32 Inch LCD TV that I use for a Computer Monitor never Burning Out I had this for 6. Years maybe more?
    Projectors use metal halide or UHP lamps to achieve very high brightness, since they are visible only by reflection. These lamps have a much shorter life than the fluorescent lamps used in flat displays, which are viewed directly and don't need to produce so much light.
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  3. Well they say because OLED TVs go all the way Black and LED try to make Black OLED TVs are batter.

    But is it worth it to Pay more for an OLED are you really going to see a batter Picture Image?

    I do not have an LED TV but I do have an LCD TV 32 Inch I use use it as a Computer Monitor and TV as well and I think the Black parts of an Image are Black.

    Should I pay Less and get a 72 LED TV then a OLED TV?
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    That's entirely a matter of subjective perception. You need to go see for yourself.
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    Originally Posted by biferi View Post
    Should I pay Less and get a 72 LED TV then a OLED TV?
    If you watch TV in a darkened room, an OLED TV is probably worth it, assuming that the higher cost is not a problem. If you watch TV in a well-lit room you should consider going to a showroom to compare the two types of TVs and see for yourself if OLED's deeper blacks are worth the extra money.

    There is a drawback to OLED which should be mentioned, just in case you aren't aware of it. Like plasma TVs, OLED TVs suffer from image retention/burn-in when a static image is displayed for long periods of time. I have also heard that OLED is less energy efficient than LED, but probably not enough to matter for a lot of people.
    Ignore list: hello_hello, tried, TechLord
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    As stated, LCD TVs requires a backlight to produce an image and in general, the best sets haves multiple hundred lighting zones that are turned on or off to produce the image. because of the overlap of light from these zones, there's always some light spillover to a neighboring zone, preventing pure black (though the newest LCDs are getting better at containing that spillover).

    In an OLED TV (as well as older plasmas) each individual OLED can be turned off, providing perfect (infinite) black for that particular "zone", down to a single pixel. During a discussion of a top Sony LCD having 384 lighting zones, one of the pioneers of modern plasma TV technology, Professor Larry Weber remarked that the plasma TV he was standing next to had 2mil+ zones to which everyone laughed and acknowledged. A 4K OLED has 8mil+ OLEDs and therefore 8mil+ "zones".

    Here's an article that discusses the difference between LCD/LED and OLED TVs. https://www.flatpanelshd.com/news.php?subaction=showfull&id=1515035932

    The catch of perfect black, is that as stated, unless you're viewing your TV in a near pitch black room, any light in the room will dim the darkness of the blacks you see. This is the first thing I ask when someone complains about their TV not having great blacks or subdued colors, "How dark is your room?". At my old home, my room was so dark, that I couldn't see my hand in front of my face with the lights off. My current place can't get as dark because of light leak, but I have blackout curtains and my viewing couch/bed is covered with black to prevent any light reflecting from it to the TV.

    Another issue with HDR sets, is because the difference between black and brightest image that can be produced is so great, you usually need a bias light (subdued lighting around the screen) behind the TV to prevent being momentarily blinded when a scene transitions from dark to bright (like walking from a dark room into sunlight).

    I've mentioned this several times on this forum, at one point I wondered if having the darkest blacks possible was worth all the cost and effort (I still have my beloved plasma), but watching a Korean horror movie set in a near pitch black morgue, I was impressed by the scenes of the heroine hiding in the dark, barely visible. Then it dawned on me. On a LCD in a room with any type of lighting, I wouldn't be able to tell that she was there, all I'd see was a dark corner.
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  7. IMHO Any TV over 65 inch begin to be way too heavy and too impractical... personally i'm interested in laser beamers - they outperform most of TV's and classical (lamp) beamers. Every year they are cheaper and more affordable.
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    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by biferi View Post
    Should I pay Less and get a 72 LED TV then a OLED TV?
    If you watch TV in a darkened room, an OLED TV is probably worth it, assuming that the higher cost is not a problem. If you watch TV in a well-lit room you should consider going to a showroom to compare the two types of TVs and see for yourself if OLED's deeper blacks are worth the extra money.
    Unless the store has a darkened viewing room, e.g. Magnolia at Best Buy, comparing TVs on a showroom floor won't allow any comparison of blacks since the store is far too bright (much brighter than any situation you'll have at home) to properly compare the sets. The only way to know for sure, is to be sure you have a trial period and view the sets in your home environment or going by reviews at sites such as avsforum.com which has very detailed reviews of the various sets.

    There is a drawback to OLED which should be mentioned, just in case you aren't aware of it. Like plasma TVs, OLED TVs suffer from image retention/burn-in when a static image is displayed for long periods of time. I have also heard that OLED is less energy efficient than LED, but probably not enough to matter for a lot of people.
    Yes, image retention (and even burn-in in rare cases) is an issue with OLEDs and one of the reasons I've held off on upgrading my plasma. If you're primarily watching movies or other content without logos or banners, image retention isn't an issue. However, on my plasma, watching an hour of a program with a logo (especially a bright colored one common on the Korean shows I watch weekly) requires 8-10 hours of non-logo content to completely erase the traces of the logo. I watch those on an older 40" LCD I have and reserve my 55" plasma for movie viewing only.
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    Sorry for the flood.

    Another point. If possible, move your viewing seat(s) closer to the TV. Like most people, you're probably sitting too far away to get the maximum viewing potential of any size TV. This is especially true for 4K TVs where you should be even closer. I sit ~6" away from my 55" and am looking at least a 65" for my next set. A rule of thumb I use is you shouldn't be able to see past the edge of the screen without turning your head.

    Here's a viewing chart with min and max distances:
    https://www.crutchfield.com/S-nYQJABBiMQv/learn/learningcenter/home/TV_placement.html
    Last edited by lingyi; 3rd Feb 2019 at 19:47.
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  10. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    better color reproduction is always worth it. from sony xbr crts, to plasmas, and now oleds. they all could suffer picture burn-in if you were a dope....
    --
    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
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    As I stated, some of my favorite Korean variety shows display a brightly colored logo like this on the top left. Image
    [Attachment 47968 - Click to enlarge]


    After a 1 1/2 hour episode, the logo on the right is faintly there, but the logo on the left is clearly there especially on light colored scenes such as sky. I didn't notice it at first, but once I did it bothers me if I watch something else after.

    I don't blame my plasma as the logo is way too large and bright, but watching it on my 40" LCD is fine for most of my viewing. It's a prime example of how not to do logos, but pretty prevalent in Korean and some Japanese shows.
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