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  1. Guys,

    I need advice... I shoot small and weird videos, often inside, sometimes outside, for VJing with it after.

    Now I would like to invest into a tripod instead of abusing a friend and yelling at them because they're shaking :P

    I saw this offer for a tripod with the head: https://www.ebay-kleinanzeigen.de/s-anzeige/manfrotto-190xprob-stativ-804rc...

    But I am wondering... better to buy this one, or go for a cheap new one?

    I have a Canon EOS 800D/Rebel T7i

    Thank you for your precious advice!


    Best,
    Pen
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  2. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Page doesn't show correctly - nothing in body, just in heading.

    Regardless, my thoughts:
    1. Manfrotto used to be a well known pro name, but they have added a lot of semi-pro and event budget consumer stuff to their line, while still trying to bank on their name. The budget consumer stuff is not any better than other budget consumer stuff. I know, I have 1 of each (pro, budget), and there is a vast difference.
    2. You need to decide how "mobile" you want to be, and what your budget is, and work from that point.
    3. A true "fluid head" is often as or more expensive than the tripod base itself, especially at pro level. But it makes a BIG difference when you are panning/tilting.
    4. Alternatively, if you need stability but easy pickup&run ability, you may want to consider a monopod. I actually created a hybrid rig which combined a shoulder & back harness with a monopod, so I could easily run to next setup, dip to touch ground, and then smooth pivot manually (since I'm familiar with manual panning, and the subject is too erratic to follow with fluid-head).
    5. Another alternative is a counterweighted, gyroscopic, or combined/hybrid floating stabilizer. This includes the "steadicam" pro models, but also a number of different or lighter models (and their size/weight should always match the cam to be used on them. I also have one of these (Glidecam 3000). These are better when you know you are going to be doing a lot of traveling shots, not just panning from single location(s).
    6. Pro tripods cost up to $3-5k, semi pro are usually 1/10 of that, budget consumer ones are 1/10 of that.
    You get what you pay for.

    Scott
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  3. Hi Scott!

    Thank you for your help!
    To be honest just a bit of panning should be enough. My main concern is that I do animations as well, so I would need something to film my table. I saw this one with a rotative column: https://www.vanguardworld.com/photo_video/products/tripods/veo-2-235ap.html#go-sectionTop
    Do you think it could film my animations and do just a little bit of panning from time to time? My videos are pretty simple, it's just for my VJ set, they are all very short, max 15 sec, but usually more 7 sec, and very experimental. But it shakes too much when we do by hands, and well, there is no real use that my friend is there expect holding the camera...
    I think I don't really have a standard use as most videographer
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  4. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Most stop-frame animation setups do not REQUIRE fluid head, as one usually does one setup from one static viewpoint and then resets for the next setup. However, what more expensive heads ARE good for with respect to SFanim is smoothness throughout the rotation arc and better markings, so that one easily gets the EXACT viewpoint needed and it is REPEATABLE.

    At your stated level of expertise, I would guess that most well-constructed tripods would do the trick for your target application. However, 2 things to note:
    1. Stability is improved by MASS. "Lightweight", even when not flimsy, is counter to that. But massive tripods get expensive. But stability is the target for tripods because that reduces camera motion & its artifacts.
    2. You may want to consider getting a model that has as an accessory, or the capability to add an accessory, a swing arm to make it easier to do overhead/90degree shots. A rotative column, if I understand you correctly, could be helpful in your situation, but not as helpful as a swing arm.

    Scott
    Last edited by Cornucopia; 6th Jan 2019 at 13:26.
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  5. +1 Cornucopia. For stop motion, stability is everything and, as he said, mass and thick legs give you that. For all other video, a fluid head is mandatory or your pans will look awful.
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    Cornucopia is right as usual, you need as much weight as you're willing/able to carry. ANother thing is that many sources say you need a certain focal length etc for handheld. However, those numbers almost always apply only to teenagers who are in very good shape. Most adults can't hold it that steady without a tripod.
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