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  1. Member
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    Hi guys, can you help me out?

    By the title, sure it sounds easy just crop a video top and bottom and walla, a 16:9 video.
    No, I dont want that.

    I have 2 same videos (tv shows) but one of them are 4:3 and the other are 16:9. The 4:3 video is much better quality than 16:9 but 4:3 is a crop version (side crop) of 16:9. I cant find a better quality 16:9 of that video so i'll have to do this myself.

    What I want to do is take the sides of 16:9 video (that was cropped out by 4:3 video) and put it on a better quality 4:3 video, turning it into a better quality 16:9 video. I know it wont be nice looking because of difference in source quality.

    What kind of software that allows me to do that? and how to do it?
    Thanks
    You know why people use Mac in their office?
    Because alot of stress can lead people to jump of the "Windows".
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  2. Member DB83's Avatar
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    The simplest way to do this is to overlay the 4:3 video over the 16:9 one. Virtually AFAIK any video editor can do this. If in doubt just 'Google' video overlay.

    But the quality of the videos is the least of your problems.

    1. Both videos will have to have the same vertical height. Otherwise will have to be resized so that will probably result in a loss of quality.

    2. If that 4:3 video is not a true crop of the 16:9 one that you have, that is to say the vertical image does not identically match at the edges of the overlay, an overlay will make the whole thing look even worse.

    3. The whole thing, even with a successful overlay, will mean a total re-encode of the video. So even your 'better quality' 4:3 video will suffer a loss of quality.

    Bottom line. Not really worth the effort.
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  3. Hello,

    I need a video tool in which the following features are included. Could you please help to find the best vendor who offers the below features at the best rate.

    1) Convert text into speech.
    2) Screen recording feature with high resolution.
    3) Video Editor (synchronize the audio and video file).

    Regards,
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  4. Member DB83's Avatar
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    ^^ Do not hijack topics.

    Your post has nothing to do with this issue.
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  5. Member
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    Originally Posted by DB83 View Post
    .... Bottom line. Not really worth the effort.
    Personally I would have led with that and probably used less polite language. But that's me, at least today .
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  6. Member
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    Originally Posted by DB83 View Post
    The simplest way to do this is to overlay the 4:3 video over the 16:9 one. Virtually AFAIK any video editor can do this. If in doubt just 'Google' video overlay.

    But the quality of the videos is the least of your problems.

    1. Both videos will have to have the same vertical height. Otherwise will have to be resized so that will probably result in a loss of quality.

    2. If that 4:3 video is not a true crop of the 16:9 one that you have, that is to say the vertical image does not identically match at the edges of the overlay, an overlay will make the whole thing look even worse.

    3. The whole thing, even with a successful overlay, will mean a total re-encode of the video. So even your 'better quality' 4:3 video will suffer a loss of quality.

    Bottom line. Not really worth the effort.
    I wouldn't mind a loss in quality since that 4:3 video is oversized (it was ripped from vhs with 10000 bit rate mpg) a 30minute video with a whooping 3gb size.
    googled video overlay came up with various software options. Can someone suggest me an easy and good one? Maybe something from this site? And free?
    You know why people use Mac in their office?
    Because alot of stress can lead people to jump of the "Windows".
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  7. Member DB83's Avatar
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    Well you have been sufficiently warned.

    From the software section you will find various video editors. And since many will come with a 30 day trial period you can try them for free.

    One other thing. Since you have a VHS rip that mpg will not readily overlay since it is not natively 4:3. You would be better resizing that to 768*576 and the 16:9 one to 1024*576 both with square pixels.

    Unfortunately 'easy' is but a short' word for what you are attempting especially if you have little or no knowledge of using a video editor.
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  8. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    2 other caveats:

    1. Besides the size & placement alignment, you would want to have both clips be set to the same resulting brightness, contrast, saturation & hue and/or whitebalance. And I mean, the SAME. They may be slightly off now and you don't notice or don't think it's an issue. But when you overlay them, it WILL be an issue if you don't adjust one or both to make them similar enough.

    2. To make the result look as seamless as possible, don't leave any seams. That means, modify the upper/foreground, 4:3 clip such that its left & right edges will dissolve into the lower/background, 16:9 clip. This could be done either by working with the 4:3 clip and ramp-fading the edges and making an intermediate clip with an alpha channel. Or, more simply, you just create a graduated alpha mask.

    There was something done similarly in a somewhat recent past thread here, where the user wanted to show their phone footage and use a blown-up, blurred, and possibly monochromic wide-cropped version, such that the phone footage stood in the foreground surrounded by it's modified replica in the background (similar to what a lot of home video shows offer). An interesting way to present portrait mode footage over a landscape mode display medium.

    Scott
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