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  1. I'm quite perplexed here.

    I have some video I took with a phone that's encoded in 720P at 30FPS, and I want to distribute it via Blu-Ray disc to family members due to their slow Internet connection. What's perplexing is that the Blu-Ray specification only allows for 24, 50, and 59.94 FPS for video with a 720p resolution. I just want to make a quick distribution via TsMuxer and burn the files to BD-R discs and mail them.

    What would be the quickest way to encode Blu-Ray compliant video? The software I use the most and am the most-familiar with is XMedia Recode; is it possible to use settings with that program to do so? Also, is it possible to use NVENC in order to encode Blu-Ray compliant video? I've read about soft telecining in that there's a way to get a desired reported frame rate by "replaying" the same frames appropriately here on the old Handbrake wiki. Would this be possible with NVENC and/or XMedia Recode, or has to be done via X264? If possible I'd like to avoid using X264 in order to quickly distribute these discs as soon as possible, but I will use X264 if necessary.

    Thank you and I appreciate any replies.
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  2. Wouldn't they be able to play the video on a computer if you send it as it is ?
    Otherwise it won't be possible to change the framerate without reencoding, which takes a few hours, depending on the video length, your computer's power, and the chosen settings – but probably less time than getting a satisfying reply on a forum which is quite quiet these days !
    And x264 is a command line encoder, which is used “under the hood” by many software frontends, including XMedia Recode and Handbrake, so not sure what you mean.
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  3. Originally Posted by 87th-E View Post
    I'm quite perplexed here.

    I have some video I took with a phone that's encoded in 720P at 30FPS, and I want to distribute it via Blu-Ray disc to family members due to their slow Internet connection. What's perplexing is that the Blu-Ray specification only allows for 24, 50, and 59.94 FPS for video with a 720p resolution. I just want to make a quick distribution via TsMuxer and burn the files to BD-R discs and mail them.

    What would be the quickest way to encode Blu-Ray compliant video? The software I use the most and am the most-familiar with is XMedia Recode; is it possible to use settings with that program to do so? Also, is it possible to use NVENC in order to encode Blu-Ray compliant video? I've read about soft telecining in that there's a way to get a desired reported frame rate by "replaying" the same frames appropriately here on the old Handbrake wiki. Would this be possible with NVENC and/or XMedia Recode, or has to be done via X264? If possible I'd like to avoid using X264 in order to quickly distribute these discs as soon as possible, but I will use X264 if necessary.

    Thank you and I appreciate any replies.
    Blu-Ray standard compliance means much more than just compliant resolution and framerate, means you will most probably have to fully re-encode your video rather than just remuxing it.
    I am not familiar with XMediaRecode, so I can't help you with that. However, you may want to import your source in BD Rebuilder which produces BD compliant outputs and burn it to discs. The initial learning curve may be a bit steep though.
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  4. 720p30 should work fine, BD compatibility is more like encoder syntax and some constrains (refs, level, profiles etc). You may force BD compatibility in x264 by using '--bluray-compat' switch, similar switch can be used for NVenc (at least NVenc in ffmpeg will not complain - tested on first gen Maxwell).
    Just use High Profile, Level 4.0 (plus few other requirements) and you should be on safe side.
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  5. Thanks for the replies everyone. I'll do the best that I can to explain.

    Originally Posted by abolibibelot View Post
    Wouldn't they be able to play the video on a computer if you send it as it is ?
    Otherwise it won't be possible to change the framerate without reencoding, which takes a few hours, depending on the video length, your computer's power, and the chosen settings – but probably less time than getting a satisfying reply on a forum which is quite quiet these days !
    And x264 is a command line encoder, which is used “under the hood” by many software frontends, including XMedia Recode and Handbrake, so not sure what you mean.
    Sorry for the jumbled explanation. What I meant to say is that my graphics card, an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 can quickly encode video via NVENC significantly faster than my CPU for the time being, which is an Intel Celeron G1820. I have yet to get an upgrade for my CPU, so I was wondering if I can encode Blu-Ray compliant video without having to use my CPU (x264) and instead use my graphics card (NVENC). If possible, I'd like to know if soft telecining is possible via NVENC, so I don't have to waste data actually encoding the extra frames for Blu-Ray compliant video and I can put more than a few videos on a single BD-R disc.

    59.94 FPS is a Blu-Ray compliant frame rate, and my source videos from my phone are 30 FPS, so I was wondering if there was a way to soft telecine the videos (if possible using NVENC) so that the frame rate is 59.94 FPS but the encoder doesn't have to encode any additional frames and instead says to "show each frame twice as long", if that makes sense. The information is on the old Handbrake wiki via this link. x264 supports this via the pulldown command as stated here, but I was wondering if NVENC could use such a command. Probably not?

    Originally Posted by pandy View Post
    720p30 should work fine, BD compatibility is more like encoder syntax and some constrains (refs, level, profiles etc). You may force BD compatibility in x264 by using '--bluray-compat' switch, similar switch can be used for NVenc (at least NVenc in ffmpeg will not complain - tested on first gen Maxwell).
    Just use High Profile, Level 4.0 (plus few other requirements) and you should be on safe side.
    If using XMedia Recode, would those settings be the ones shown here? I have yet to adjust the Level and the Profile, but these are the settings shown for XMedia Recode when using NVENC H.264.


    Another inquiry of mine; when encoding using x264, would the "Fake Interlaced" flag work for 720p30 video so Blu-Ray players would see it as 720p59.94?
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  6. Originally Posted by 87th-E View Post
    via the pulldown command as stated here[/URL], but I was wondering if NVENC could use such a command. Probably not?
    nope, ffmpeg doesn't support pulldown even in libx264 - all you can do if you really insist to have 59.94 (60000/1001) then you efficiently double number of frames from your 30fps video slowed down to 29.97 (30000/1001)

    Originally Posted by 87th-E View Post
    Originally Posted by pandy View Post
    720p30 should work fine, BD compatibility is more like encoder syntax and some constrains (refs, level, profiles etc). You may force BD compatibility in x264 by using '--bluray-compat' switch, similar switch can be used for NVenc (at least NVenc in ffmpeg will not complain - tested on first gen Maxwell).
    Just use High Profile, Level 4.0 (plus few other requirements) and you should be on safe side.
    If using XMedia Recode, would those settings be the ones shown here? I have yet to adjust the Level and the Profile, but these are the settings shown for XMedia Recode when using NVENC H.264.
    Don't know - they can call BD anything they like. If you are really pursuing bitstream compatible with BD then perhaps you need to verify this by yourself (H.264 analyzer and check for encoding details). Being on your side i would rather use https://github.com/rigaya/NVEnc/blob/master/NVEncC_Options.en.md to NVEnc BD encoding - as i wrote previously seem there is BD compliance switch supported by ffmpeg. Bellow one seem to work but as i have no NVidia HW then can't support you on this.

    Code:
    ffmpeg.exe -hide_banner -v 32 -stats -y -i "filename" -c:v h264_nvenc -level:v 4.0 -preset:v hq -profile:v high -cq 23 -qmin:v 8 -qmax:v 29 -bufsize:v 10000k -maxrate:v 20000k -g 250 -bf 3 -refs:v 3 -rc:v vbr_hq -rc-lookahead 32 -b_adapt 1 -temporal-aq 1 -spatial-aq 1 -aq-strength 8 -i_qfactor 0.75 -b_qfactor 1.1 -coder:v cabac -bluray-compat 1 -aud 1 -c:a ac3 -b:a 384k "%~n1_nv.mkv"

    Originally Posted by 87th-E View Post
    Another inquiry of mine; when encoding using x264, would the "Fake Interlaced" flag work for 720p30 video so Blu-Ray players would see it as 720p59.94?
    Nope - this switch works in different way - it encode progressive video with activated interlace encoding but encoder is informed that source is progressive thus video is encoded as progressive with interlace flag active.
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