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  1. Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    United States
    Search Comp PM
    As I've stated in many of my other posts, I'm a fan of fewer, larger HDDs vs. more, smaller HDDs. I've switched the majority of my HDDs to 8Tb+. And HDD prices are at their lowest at <$22/Tb for some 4Tb+ drives and the lowest prices have stabilized at ~$20/Tb over the past few years.

    Based on posters comments from other countries, this is likely only for the U.S., but HDD prices are at their lowest at <$22/Tb for 4Tb+ HDDs (external and internal) with the bargain 10Tb externals @ $180.00 ($18/Tb) at Best Buy this Black Friday.

    I'm not listing any specific links, since prices changes (sometimes daily), but check Newegg and Amazon.

    BTW, I'm a bit paranoid about HDD prices since they're now a commodity with prices that fluctuate with heavy supply and demand. II always have a few spares for backup/expansion since I remember the Singapore flood of 2011 that destroyed two WD factories and HDD prices shot up and stayed up for nearly two years. I'm temped by the 10TB externals, but probably won't be getting anything this year, because I still have some spare drives from last year.
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  2. Mod Neophyte Super Moderator redwudz's Avatar
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    Sep 2002
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    USA
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    One argument might be...Larger HDD,= larger loss of data if it fails. But I suspect the failure rate for 4TB drives isn't likely any higher than a 1TB drive.I guess it really depends if the data is backed up or you can afford to lose it.

    I've mostly given up on backing up my MKV video data to BD or BDDL discs.
    I just use WD portable HDDs, 4TB and 6TB for video backup. I still have the original BD/DVDs, so I can re-encode to MKV if needed.
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  3. Member
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    Jul 2007
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    United States
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    That's the usual argument against larger HDDs "OMG, 4, 6, 8, 10TB lost in an instant!"

    The way I look and deal with storage is "Every bit (no pun intended) must be backed up". When I budget for additional HDDs, I always times it by at least two, one original and one backup with a third drive for important files.

    At least we've moved away from backing everything up on 360K floppies. Backup of a 20MB HDD took a looooooooong time back then!
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  4. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    Oct 2005
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    666th portal
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    you just never know. i've had multiple nas boxes running for 10 years now. had one failure in a 4x2tb array. not a drive, the box failed. that was a plextor unit. the oldest running now is a zyxel 2x1.5gb raid 1 that's been on 24x7 for 7 years with no problems with the original samsung drives... qnap boxes have also been good here.
    --
    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
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  5. Member
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    Jul 2007
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    United States
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    Right now I'm tweaking a second PC (for playing emulated games) with a couple of 10+ year old drives. On the other hand, I have drives less than a year old that are exhibiting problem (thankfully they're going in for replacement under warranty). As you said, "you just never know".
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  6. Backblaze quarterly provide report about HDD failure rate - latest https://www.backblaze.com/blog/hard-drive-stats-for-q1-2018/ confirm rules observed since many years. Some vendors can deliver in one series high quality and significantly less quality for another series , secondly some vendors are usually in area very high and high quality - from my perspective such vendor is HGST, former Hitachi now owned by WD.

    I know that some vendors changing mechanical requirements depends on product class for example consumer disks are allowed to have higher vibration than disk working in multiple disk enclosures - and they provide simple explanation - vibration for every disk may be mechanically conducted and combine with vibration of theirs disk leading to unwanted and dangerous resonances that may and usually do reduce performance and increase failure rate.
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