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  1. Member
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    I have a Blu-ray and DVD of the same movie, But the Blu-ray does't have the English Dub (Which is hilarious). When i open both files (lossless rips) in my editor (powerdirector) the audio doesn't sync up. The videos are the same length, but have different FPS. Can anyone help me with this? Tips, tricks or just a straight up answer would be greatly appreciated.
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  2. Originally Posted by Sarcastos View Post
    Can anyone help me with this? Tips, tricks or just a straight up answer would be greatly appreciated.
    No, because you haven't supplied near enough information yet.

    When you say the audio doesn't synch up, do you mean it's off, but by the same amount all the way through? If so, just allow for the delay when muxing, or remove it entirely before muxing.

    Or do you mean it begins in synch and gets more and more off as the film progresses? Or a combination of both (off at the beginning, even more off at the end)?

    What are the 2 different framerates. I'll assume NTSC DVD at 29.97fps. What about the Blu-Ray?
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  3. Mod Neophyte Super Moderator redwudz's Avatar
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    Check the length of both audios. MediaInfo can do that.

    Second part, if the DVD audio doesn't sync, is the sync error the same all through the video?
    If the sync has the same amount of error, much easier, Maybe just an offset in the audio start times.

    Or does the audio error gradually change? If it gradually changes, the lengths are not likely not the same or the audio has been edited. Hard to fix.
    It's not uncommon for DVD and BD versions to be edited differently.


    But other members may be able to give you more information.


    And welcome to our forums.

    Sorry, manono beat me to it.
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  4. Member
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    Originally Posted by manono View Post
    Originally Posted by Sarcastos View Post
    Can anyone help me with this? Tips, tricks or just a straight up answer would be greatly appreciated.
    No, because you haven't supplied near enough information yet.

    When you say the audio doesn't synch up, do you mean it's off, but by the same amount all the way through? If so, just allow for the delay when muxing, or remove it entirely before muxing.

    Or do you mean it begins in synch and gets more and more off as the film progresses? Or a combination of both (off at the beginning, even more off at the end)?

    What are the 2 different framerates. I'll assume NTSC DVD at 29.97fps. What about the Blu-Ray?

    Sorry, The audio is synced and then slowly goes out of sync more and more. Yes the DVD is 29.97fps and the Blu-ray is 24fps.
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  5. Okay, that's helpful. I'll assume it's a movie. Movies on NTSC DVD once the telecine is removed are at 23.976fps. Your Blu-Ray is 24fps. If the video content is the same (same number of frames), then it might be as easy as shortening the DVD audio by a ratio of 23.976/24.000. And if the two versions are identical, the Blu-Ray should be about 3.5 seconds shorter per every hour of length.
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    Yes it's a movie. The dvd is progressive, there's no interlacing. The two versions from what i've looked up online are the same cut of the film, just different FPS. So when i put them in my editor the 29.97fps (The audio i want) is longer than the 24fps (The video i want). I've come across this before and basicly just gave up.
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  7. Originally Posted by Sarcastos View Post
    Yes it's a movie. The dvd is progressive, there's no interlacing. The two versions from what i've looked up online are the same cut of the film, just different FPS. So when i put them in my editor the 29.97fps (The audio i want) is longer than the 24fps (The video i want). I've come across this before and basicly just gave up.


    The DVD audio is "longer" because it's running "slower" at 23.976 fps . The BD audio is running at 24.0 fps, which is faster, thus shorter in duration

    So if they are the exact same edits, the exact same frames, you would slow down the BD video from 24.0 to 23.976 to perfectly match the DVD audio . Or speed up the DVD audio by 24/23.976 as manono suggested, to perfectly match the BD video

    "29.97" would be the wrong frame rate for progressive DVD movie of the same BD that is at 24.0 FPS . It should be 29.97 with telecine (field repeats; you should see "combing" or interlacing, unless your program is deinterlacing the preview). Reversing the telecine would give you 23.976 progressive film frames (not sure if PD can do this correctly)

    Personally, I would do the video. It might be as simple as muxing into a container and setting the fps. No loss. But changing the audio requires resampling and re-encoding if you want to do it correctly

    But if you want to use an editor, in many editing programs, what you want to do is known as "interpreting the footage" . You keep the exact same frames, you just assign a faster or slower frame rate (slower in this case). Not sure if PD can do this.
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  8. Originally Posted by Sarcastos View Post
    I've come across this before and basicly just gave up.
    You should look up telecine or 3:2 pulldown so you can begin to understand what's going on. Because, apparently, you understood nothing I wrote. Perhaps pdr was able to explain the concepts better so you can get a handle on this.

    I don't (and won't) use anything Cyberlink produces for any video work and, like pdr, I have no idea whether or not Power Director can do what's required.
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  9. You can change the frame rate very easily with MKVToolNix. You can do it from the GUI, just select 24000/1001p for "default duration" and check the "fix bitstream timing info" box.

    That's assuming you don't care about any audio from the bluray, since that will be out of sync after the frame rate change. If you want audio from both, then you have to sample rate convert one of the audio tracks.
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  10. Originally Posted by Luke M View Post
    That's assuming you don't care about any audio from the bluray...
    I, for one, wouldn't assume that. Why would anyone in their right mind want only a dub track, replacing the original language track? Of course, my own thought is to wonder why anyone would want a dub track at all.
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  11. Originally Posted by manono View Post
    Originally Posted by Luke M View Post
    That's assuming you don't care about any audio from the bluray...
    I, for one, wouldn't assume that. Why would anyone in their right mind want only a dub track, replacing the original language track? Of course, my own thought is to wonder why anyone would want a dub track at all.
    It just wastes a little disk space to have two MKVs instead of one. No big deal.

    Something I should have mentioned is that changing the frame rate will make subtitles out of sync...so that's another issue to consider.
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  12. MKV allow for multiple audio tracks. No need to create two different MKVs. And, although he hasn't said, maybe the intent is another Blu-Ray with two audio tracks.
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