VideoHelp Forum

Our website is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors. Consider supporting us by disable your adblocker or try DVDFab and copy, convert or make Blu-rays and DVDs! :)
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 30 of 30
Thread
  1. Is it possible to remove this VHS noise using audacity without severely degrading the main audio track? I tried using the noise reduction feature but was not successful.
    Image Attached Files
    Quote Quote  
  2. That can be fixed by adjusting the tracking when you capture.
    Quote Quote  
  3. I thought tracking is just for picture adjustment.
    Quote Quote  
  4. Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    San Francisco, California
    Search PM
    HiFi audio is written and read by heads on the drum; hence, it is affected by the tracking control as well. It is very sensitive to the head-switching point.
    Quote Quote  
  5. Sometimes you need to capture the video twice, with different tracking adjustments. Once to get clean video, another time to get clean audio.
    Quote Quote  
  6. Adjusting the tracking manually can get rid of the noise but reduces the hi-fi audio volume and introduces noise to the picture. I think I better just capture the audio in mono.
    Quote Quote  
  7. The mono linear track is usually much worse quality than the HiFi track. Did you not understand my last post? You want to capture the tape twice, once with with the best tracking for video, then again for the best tracking for audio. Then combine the good video with the good audio.
    Quote Quote  
  8. I understand but to get best video and audio quality, automatic tracking is best. Adjusting the tracking manually reduces the fidelity of the hi-fi audio and add noise to the picture.
    Quote Quote  
  9. Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    San Francisco, California
    Search PM
    No, you apparently don't understand. The automatic setting may give you the best picture, but it is messing up your HiFi audio. Your audio will have better fidelity if you manually adjust tracking to eliminate the artifact. In practice, I have seldom found it necessary to do two captures there is usually a manual setting that gives good picture and sound.
    Quote Quote  
  10. I've tried manual tracking. By the time all the hi-fi noise is gone, the hi-fi audio has become low fidelity and there is picture noise. I probably have to compromise and leave some hi-fi noise while maintaining high fidelity audio.
    Quote Quote  
  11. Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    United States
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by digicube View Post
    I've tried manual tracking. By the time all the hi-fi noise is gone, the hi-fi audio has become low fidelity and there is picture noise. I probably have to compromise and leave some hi-fi noise while maintaining high fidelity audio.
    This means the tracking is so far off the VCR has switched to the mono linear track (much worse quality) .
    Perhaps try another VCR
    Quote Quote  
  12. Tried 3 different brand of VCR, still same problem. I think it's a manufacturing defect.
    Quote Quote  
  13. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    dFAQ.us/lordsmurf
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by digicube View Post
    Tried 3 different brand of VCR
    That doesn't mean anything. More "brands" are rebadges.
    Which exact 3 VCRs did you try?
    Quote Quote  
  14. JVC HRS-7600U, Mitsubishi HS-448, Panasonic SVHS VCR. They are definitely not rebadges since they are of different size, shape and weight.
    Quote Quote  
  15. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    dFAQ.us/lordsmurf
    Search Comp PM
    Just listened to it. No, audacity really cannot do too much for it.
    Maybe Sound Forge, with the NR filter, but it won't be entirely gone during audio, just silent parts.
    The recording may be misaligned, so you need to misalign a deck to match.
    Or use mono/linear track instead.
    Last edited by lordsmurf; 9th Sep 2018 at 03:01. Reason: Typo.
    Quote Quote  
  16. Yea must be a manufacturing defect since it's a small budget commercial release.
    Quote Quote  
  17. Originally Posted by lordsmurf View Post
    just silent parents.
    I was just about to say the same thing.
    Quote Quote  
  18. Is this what you want?
    I did it with audacity, the principle is called destructive interference. You duplicate the track and invert the phase to make them cancel each other out, in a more sophisticated software you could use some fancy comb filtering marking only the noisy out keeping what you want.

    Your sample only has silence, not very useful.
    Image Attached Files
    Quote Quote  
  19. The noise was not eliminated completely, I need a method that can do that like normal tape hiss.
    Quote Quote  
  20. The noise was canceled out, try again with a rendered out sample, see if you can find any.
    Again, you sample is useless, get something with a voice or music instead of pure silence.
    Image Attached Files
    Quote Quote  
  21. Unfortunately I no longer have the tape.
    Quote Quote  
  22. Well, you ask to remove the noise, the noise is removed with Audacity. Try again if you find the tape or some parts of the capture.
    Quote Quote  
  23. I can still hear noise in your FLAC file. It should be complete silence.
    Quote Quote  
  24. It is a complete silence (VHS NOISE2.flac), it has nothing in the track and nothing in the frequency analysis, it's all zero.
    If you are hearing something, it's on your side.
    Quote Quote  
  25. Yes. VHS NOISE2 is complete silence. Thanks. I was listening to the first file you posted. I assume destructive interference wouldn't work if there are music or dialogue mixed in since the noise is not uniform.
    Quote Quote  
  26. To listen to the first sample you must play it on Audacity with all 4 tacks turned on, you'll hear nothing.
    Destructive interference is a concept that you apply with a technique to remove the noise, if you just do the same with a music, you'll flat everything out and this is not what you want.
    Quote Quote  
  27. Get a sample with something on it instead of silence, if is possible, I can have a look at it. Hurry up because I'll leave my office soon.
    Quote Quote  
  28. I found something similar. Here it is.
    Image Attached Files
    Quote Quote  
  29. His technique will eliminate all the other sounds too.
    Quote Quote  
  30. Here a small sample from your file, if you look over the track and zoom in at the parts that has this noises, you see that it does a common pattern around 196 Hz to 3694 Hz more or less, it looks like a morse code, you'll see a series of peaks. Notice that you can remove a good amount of the noise and trashing a good portion of the frequency we need making it sound like a radio.
    To restore the audio to sound natural again, is possible to do what I did to the whole sound (effect > voice reduction and isolation, Isolate and Invert vocals, Strength 4.60, use previous frequency's for low and high), use it like a alpha channel in Photoshop/Gimp.

    We use that as a base together with the original sound using a differential filter, everything that is common is rejected, the noise cancel it self out and everything that is not, pass through. Unfortunately you need something much more sophisticated like software and hardware, than Audacity.

    Also, this is not a thing you do with one pass, there's no easy way to do it, it's like restoring an old photograph with Photoshop/Gimp, you'll have to work this out.

    Things I didn't try but could help, try to remove the vocals around the noisy areas, get a noise profile from that, undo the vocal cancellation and apply the filter in every single peak and see how it goes.
    Image Attached Files
    Quote Quote  



Similar Threads