VideoHelp Forum

Our website is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors. Consider supporting us by disable your adblocker or Try ConvertXtoDVD and convert all your movies to DVD. Free trial ! :)
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 4 of 4
Thread
  1. Using Toast 8 with Mac 10.10.5. I've edited a bunch of .mov videos and saved as .mp4.

    The .mp4s add up to a little more than 2 GB. But Toast insists there's not enough room on my 4.6 (I understand the usable capacity actually is 4.3) GB blank DVD-R.

    I've successfully done this in the past, with the same software, same equipment. Does it make sense that Toast would say the disc doesn't have enough space?

    * Yes, it's saying not enough space on the blank DVD. It's not saying there's not enough memory on my hard drive.

    * Yes, I've tried it with other blank DVDs, same result.

    * I've tried saving as an image file, to burn on the DVD. But the image file ended up being around 12 GB.

    Thanks for any insight.
    Quote Quote  
  2. If you are writing the files to a data disc there will be no problem (but you won't be able to play the files on a regular DVD player). If you're making a movie DVD the files probably have to be rencoded with DVD specs which means MPEG 2. How big the files are depends on the bitrate you use. Since your ISO image is 12 GB and a DVD is 4.3 GB you have to reduce the bitrate to about 1/3 of what you're currently using. MPEG 2 is less efficient than AVC or HEVC and requires higher bitrates to retain quality. So your quality will likely suffer.
    Quote Quote  
  3. Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    If you are writing the files to a data disc there will be no problem (but you won't be able to play the files on a regular DVD player). If you're making a movie DVD the files probably have to be rencoded with DVD specs which means MPEG 2. How big the files are depends on the bitrate you use. Since your ISO image is 12 GB and a DVD is 4.3 GB you have to reduce the bitrate to about 1/3 of what you're currently using. MPEG 2 is less efficient than AVC or HEVC and requires higher bitrates to retain quality. So your quality will likely suffer.
    You've answered my question quite clearly. I do want the resultant DVDs to play on a regular DVD player.

    Thanks very much for your help.
    Quote Quote  
  4. Explorer Case's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Middle Earth
    Search Comp PM
    The (recent) Toast manual says that it encodes for up to 2.5 hours of video per DVD layer. For more hours of video, you may need to split that over multiple discs.
    It is a bit content dependent, as scenes with random movements (fire, water, crowds, handheld camera), or fast action, will require more bitrate than slow scenes (talking heads).
    Quote Quote  



Similar Threads