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  1. I have roughly 75 MP4 video files containing MST3K and RiffTrax shorts. I like to play a bunch of them in sequence, typically via Kodi for Fire TV. However, their volume levels jump considerably each from another, and so I'm constantly jumping for the receiver's remote to adjust the volume up or down, often for very large amounts. And this is driving me crazy!

    So I would like suggestions about a procedure to match the volume levels of all of these files. I'm moderately skilled in audio/video editing and processing, and although the open/free software tools available for Windows are often very powerful, I find that they are hideously complicated to use because of all the scores of different settings and countless combinations of settings. That's why I've purchased several different commercial applications to help me. Here's a list:
    • TMPGenc Mastering Works 6
    • TMPGenc MPEG Smart Renderer 5
    • TMPGEnc Authoring Works 5
    • TMPGEnc Plus 2.5 (paid)
    • VSDC Video Editor Pro
    • GoldWave
    • VideoMeld
    • Corel VideoStudio Ultimate X8
    I figure I may need to split the audio and video of these MP4 files, use some tool(s) to match the audio files' volume levels, then re-combine them with the videos ensuring lip-synch, perhaps into MKV containers (I'll probably need help with re-merging the audio and video streams). In my experience, normalizing all the files will NOT do this. And I foolishly spent money buying something called MP4Gain, which was specifically advertised as being able to equalize the volumes of a set of MP4 files, but that turned out to be utterly FALSE advertising (all it would do is normalize, which is worthless). Obviously, I would prefer something much easier, but I don't know what that would be.

    But if this is best accomplished with some of those hideously complicated open source/freeware tools, I'm completely open to advice.


    Thanks!
    Last edited by EmmB; 14th Jun 2018 at 14:12. Reason: typo
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    Your problem is that loudness is subjective. It varies by listener and program material. Have you tried the Volume Amplification control in Kodi? It's supposed to perform compression.
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  3. Originally Posted by JVRaines View Post
    Your problem is that loudness is subjective. It varies by listener and program material. Have you tried the Volume Amplification control in Kodi? It's supposed to perform compression.
    Hey, thanks for your reply! Allow me to explain that I used the word "volume" simply because I couldn't decide which term(s) to use: Sound Levels, Amplitude, Amplification, decibels, gain, Sound Pressure Levels, loudness, peak levels, or what have you. While "volume" certainly could be considered subjective, my OPs reference to frequently needing to adjust the receiver's remote control for "volume" won out in the end.

    And I've been using the Kodi control you referenced for years, and it's effects are indeed noticeable, but inadequate.

    However, I just found a freeware tool here on VideoHelp that looks promising (though I haven't tried it yet): BOX4 ( https://www.videohelp.com/software/BOX4 ). Since all those shorts are either mono or stereo only, BOX4 should work well (it doesn't like more than 2 channel audio).
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  4. ffmpeg can normalize loudness for your files but it require reencode audio (very fast when compared to video reencoding) - there is no 100% working method for only metadata (no reencoding) as plenty of players are not capable to apply gain based on metadata.
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    The OP already told us no luck with ordinary peak normalization. What's really needed is normalization against a measure of loudness, such as ITU-R_BS.1770 or EBU Tech 3341.
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  6. Originally Posted by JVRaines View Post
    The OP already told us no luck with ordinary peak normalization. What's really needed is normalization against a measure of loudness, such as ITU-R_BS.1770 or EBU Tech 3341.
    That's why i pointed to loudness normalization.
    ffmpeg can normalize loudness for your files
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