VideoHelp Forum

Our website is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors. Consider supporting us by disable your adblocker or Try ConvertXtoDVD and convert all your movies to DVD. Free trial ! :)
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9
Thread
  1. Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Vermont
    Search Comp PM
    I have a Sony Non-Wireless bluray player (BDP S1200) that I want to connect up so I can do Netflix. I also have a spare modem that I'm no longer using. Can that be connected to the player to get internet?
    Quote Quote  
  2. Going Mad TheFamilyMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    south SF bay area, CA USA
    Search Comp PM
    Ideally you should have a wireless router which supplies your home's internet access, and those usually have ethernet cable connector sockets (a.k.a. ports) on them. Connecting a cat 5 ethernet cable between your router and your bluray player will give the bluray player access to the internet for its streaming apps. The term modem is very generic. But if you are talking about a dial-up modem of olden days (1990s, early 2000s), that won't work primarily because its data rate is much too slow for streaming video. An inexpensive (~$30 usd) alternative if you have wireless internet in your home, Roku makes a range of wireless internet streaming devices for streaming Netflix, and other such stuff, to your TV, though they connect directly to the TV via an HDMI cable.
    Usually long gone and forgotten
    Quote Quote  
  3. Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    United States
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by dfisher052 View Post
    I have a Sony Non-Wireless bluray player (BDP S1200) that I want to connect up so I can do Netflix. I also have a spare modem that I'm no longer using. Can that be connected to the player to get internet?
    No. You need one of two options to connect an Ethernet-only Blu-ray player without running an Ethernet cable to it: a universal Wi-Fi to Ethernet adapter (connects to a wireless network) or a set of powerline Ethernet adapters. Note that success with powerline Ethernet adapters depends on how your home is wired and the condition of your home's electrical wiring.

    Universal Wi-Fi to Ethernet adapters:
    https://www.amazon.com/IOGEAR-Universal-Ethernet-Adapter-GWU627/dp/B004UAKCS6/
    https://www.amazon.com/IOGEAR-Universal-Ethernet-Adapter-GWU627/dp/B018YPWORE/
    https://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-Universal-Ethernet-Adapter-WNCE2001/dp/B003KPBRRW/

    Example of powerline Ethernet adapters:
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01MTNKNPZ?ref_=ams_ad_dp_ttl
    Ignore list: hello_hello, tried, TechLord
    Quote Quote  
  4. Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Vermont
    Search Comp PM
    Sorry, I mis spoke. I want to connect spare Router to the Lan connection on my bluray player. Will that work?
    Quote Quote  
  5. Mod Neophyte Super Moderator redwudz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    USA
    Search Comp PM
    If you can get an Ethernet cable to the player from your router, it can access the Internet and if you have a NetFlix membership,
    you should be able to use it to watch. The player may take some setup, but the Sony manual or website should be able to clarify.
    Quote Quote  
  6. Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Vermont
    Search Comp PM
    Thanks!
    Quote Quote  
  7. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Deep in the Heart of Texas
    Search PM
    Most people who get the internet from ISPs get it via a modem of some sort (modem in the modern generic sense = router + medium bridge/converter). Cable modem, FIOS modem, even ADSL modem.

    Your router portion separates the wider internet at large from you personal/home network.
    On the home side, you likely will have IP addresses in the range of 192.168.x.x.

    Unless you want the mess of multiple NATs and subnets, you want to make sure that any other device you put within your home net doesn't itself have routing/NAT enabled. Or if it does, you only connect to the Intranet side (as if a hub or switch) and not the WAN side.

    But it should be entirely doable.

    Scott
    Quote Quote  
  8. Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Vermont
    Search Comp PM
    Thanks again.
    Quote Quote  
  9. Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    United States
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    Most people who get the internet from ISPs get it via a modem of some sort (modem in the modern generic sense = router + medium bridge/converter). Cable modem, FIOS modem, even ADSL modem.

    Your router portion separates the wider internet at large from you personal/home network.
    On the home side, you likely will have IP addresses in the range of 192.168.x.x.

    Unless you want the mess of multiple NATs and subnets, you want to make sure that any other device you put within your home net doesn't itself have routing/NAT enabled. Or if it does, you only connect to the Intranet side (as if a hub or switch) and not the WAN side.

    But it should be entirely doable.

    Scott
    True some ISPs now use residential gateways (for phone+Internet+cable) or issue combination modem-routers to their customers but in the past, other than FIOS, most issued ADSL modems or cable modems with only a single Ethernet port and no WiFi. These older modems can't be re-purposed as a switch. Network and device configuration issues aside, it isn't physically possible because there is just one Ethernet port and no WiFi. That is why I said "No".
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 30th Mar 2018 at 11:44.
    Ignore list: hello_hello, tried, TechLord
    Quote Quote  



Similar Threads