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  1. Member
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    Should I start over again? (Note: I'm sort of new to encoding, I have fiddled around with any video converter, dvdshrink and makemkv in the past briefly).

    Main purpose, compress my dvd sitcoms for portability on my ipad pro 12.9 512 gb. Space is limited.

    Re-encoded about 91 files with about 20 remaining with an initial estimated time of 5 days plus using Vidcoder (and then I've got to do the other tv series, so it's probably going to take the entire month or more). There is about 1 day left on the ETA. All of a sudden, I realize that I forgot to check the files with mediainfo.

    Only reason for asking is because research says to avoid variable framerate. Always choose constant instead. What about the audio portion? Does the audio also have to have a "constant" bitrate? If so, how? Vidcoder and Handbrake doesn't have a "constant" audio bitrate option.

    I have the following (for all 91 files currently ... with about 20 to go.)
    General: Overall bit rate mode: variable
    Video: Frame rate mode: variable
    Audio: Bit rate mode: variable

    I did a test run with a smaller file. Changed the frames per second to 30 and selected "constant." Checking output file through mediainfo shows the following (and is this output file what's desirable where only the video frame rate is constant. General bit rate mode remains at variable (is this fine?). Should I only concern myself with "constant" video framerate?

    Is this what I am going for always?

    General: Overall bit rate mode: variable
    Video: Frame rate mode: constant
    Audio: Bit rate mode: variable
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  2. Constant frame rate is usually preferable but variable framerate also works fine on decent players. So you will probably not notice any bad effects. I would set it to constant for the remaining 20 files but not re-encode the already finished ones.

    Variable bitrate audio is totally fine. Constant bitrate audio is mostly used only with very old formats like AC3.
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  3. Member
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    Originally Posted by sneaker View Post
    Constant frame rate is usually preferable but variable framerate also works fine on decent players. So you will probably not notice any bad effects. I would set it to constant for the remaining 20 files but not re-encode the already finished ones.

    Variable bitrate audio is totally fine. Constant bitrate audio is mostly used only with very old formats like AC3.
    Appreciate the advice. My OCD in me unfortunately might get me to eventually re-encode those 91 files in the future/distant future.

    I've also read about individuals having audio video sync issues after re-encoding ... does this happen to have anything to do with these variable video framerates, and audio variable bitrates? Could they play apart in sync concerns?

    With regards to the audio portion, the gold standard is simply to use variable bitrate? Is it even possible to convert them to "constant" audio bitrate in handbrake or my preferred choice vidcoder (even though vidcoder is essentially a repackaged handbrake). Is it even "necessary" so to speak or will "variable audio bitrate" play nice "everywhere"?

    My other concern is that vidcoder has the audio "mixdown" default to Dolby Pro Logic II. The other option are mono, stereo, dolby surround, 5.1 channel. Do I simply leave it as default pro logic II? Isn't pro logic II artificial enhancements of some sort to the soundtrack. The output files sounded perfectly fine with pro logic II through my set of generic radioshack wireless headphones and ipad pro's factory speakers.

    What's the preferred choice or does it not even matter when it comes to movies and tv sitcoms, and animations?
    Stereo
    5.1 chance
    dolby pro logic II
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  4. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    No no. Do not re-encode your existing encodes. If you feel the need to re-encode, go back & do it from the originals.

    Also, 5.1 or 7.1 channel surround mixes may or may not be necessary, but those choices should be determined by bitrate budget and playback equipment limitations vs. the content. IOW, if the type of show demands it, keep it discreet multichannel if you can, otherwise if you still want surround, go with a dolby prologic mixdown. But if there is only stereo or mono, or if the soundtrack sucks or is superfluous, just keep straight 2 or even 1 channel.
    However, if your playback system is, or only ever will be for the forseeable future, 2 channel, there is no need for discreet multichannel. Go with stereo, or at most PL/PL2.

    PL or PL2 is a 4->2->4 or 5->2->5 matrix encoding method (respectively), which works pretty good most of the time, occassionally convincingly, never perfectly, compared to true discreet end-to-end 4 or 5 channel systems.
    Its method is very compatible with standard stereo quality-wise, so there is no harm to downmixing to that as opposed to just using 2 straight tracks. Only downside would be the time invested in the mixdown.

    Scott
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  5. Member
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    Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    No no. Do not re-encode your existing encodes. If you feel the need to re-encode, go back & do it from the originals.

    Also, 5.1 or 7.1 channel surround mixes may or may not be necessary, but those choices should be determined by bitrate budget and playback equipment limitations vs. the content. IOW, if the type of show demands it, keep it discreet multichannel if you can, otherwise if you still want surround, go with a dolby prologic mixdown. But if there is only stereo or mono, or if the soundtrack sucks or is superfluous, just keep straight 2 or even 1 channel.
    However, if your playback system is, or only ever will be for the forseeable future, 2 channel, there is no need for discreet multichannel. Go with stereo, or at most PL/PL2.

    PL or PL2 is a 4->2->4 or 5->2->5 matrix encoding method (respectively), which works pretty good most of the time, occassionally convincingly, never perfectly, compared to true discreet end-to-end 4 or 5 channel systems.
    Its method is very compatible with standard stereo quality-wise, so there is no harm to downmixing to that as opposed to just using 2 straight tracks. Only downside would be the time invested in the mixdown.

    Scott
    I think I'm using the incorrect word. Yes, when I said re-encode I meant using the original source and I would simply delete the existing encodes.

    My budget is approximately 500 gb on my ipad (512gb capacity) that will be devoted to movies (animations)/tv sitcoms 95% and music 5% in terms of overall storage space. Big Bang Theory, Seinfeld, Friends, Will & Grace, Frasier, Disney movies, etc.

    With respect to audio, I simply want whatever primary soundtrack is used during regular DVD playback. Not looking to "manufacture" something that isn't there. Does Vidcoder or Handbrake automatically select the default soundtrack? Currently with all the movies alone that I want, it's actually pushing over the 510 GB mark, meaning I'll have to rework the mathematics and increase file compression. For all the music, initially I wanted 192kbps, but I'm thinking I need to drop it down to 144kbps or so.

    For all my sitcoms, I'm still looking at around 300GB, with each episode in the neighborhood of around 210 to 225mb. Then toss in the animations and I'm looking at another 200GB. I still want them to be sharp and fairly detailed and not blurry. I still need to rip season 9 and 10 and budget season 11 and the final season 12 for the Big Bang Theory. Too bad my blu ray drive died last year.

    In the past, I used Any Video Converter (AVC) and obtain sizes around 250mb to 275mb plus but they simply don't look as sharp as the encodes done with Vidcoder where the size at even 200mb look so much better. The actors faces using AVC encode look more blurry and had blocky pixelations.

    This time around, I'm trying to get rid of those blocky pixelations somehow. Vidcoder is a good start. Just looking for more tips to increase definition/sharpness to the characters' eyes.


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  6. Member
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    Looks like there's some added bits of "audio information" with the Dolby Pro Logic II setting. I can hear the difference using my headphones. I remember back in the days when I use to have one of those AIWA stereo system with the cassette deck and cd player rolled up into one, putting on the dolby pro logic or whatever "audio enhancement" setting creating "artificial" audio playback, somewhat with an "echo" effect. It sounded cool but didn't sound natural to the original source material.

    I might have to either encode again using just the "stereo selection" and/or check the box that says "audio pass through" in vidcoder. I checked mediainfo and even though all the audio info looks exactly the same, it simply doesn't sound the same using the Dolby Pro Logic II selection. It sounds like there's extra "scratches" or whatever it's called.

    Just did a test run using ULTRAFAST video encoder and under the audio encoder setting using "stereo" and "audio pass through" in vidcoder, and now it sounds the same as the original file without that "echo" or "added dolby pro logic II" effect.
    Last edited by strawberryshortcake; 13th Feb 2018 at 07:23.
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