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  1. Hey everyone,

    I have not done a lot of Blu Ray authoring over the years. A lot of my authoring was on standard DVDs back in the day before HD video came into play. I am use to rendering content for internet videos on Youtube and what not, but I am looking to put my Blu Ray burner to work with projects.

    I use Vegas Pro version 14 with DVD Architect Pro 6. I am so use to working with 1080p 60fps video for online or digital media purposes, I forgot that Blu Ray does not use full 1080p. So I was wondering what my options where for 1080p output to Blu Ray.

    I currently have a 4 hour plus video project in the works that will need to be put to a multi blu ray disc output. The footage was shot in full HD on a Sony NX100 video camera. The footage is 1080p @ 60fps - 50Mb/s bit rate files. I was wondering what the best rendering options are for outputting to blu Ray discs. Is 1080i the best? Or is a pulldown method with progressive frames the better option? This is kinda new for me, as I am use to being able to just output full digital files for online or digital media use.

    I know my way around Vegas pretty well, and I am pretty savvy when it comes to video formats/containers. I have just never had full HD footage to target to blu ray before. Any help, feedback, ect would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
    Last edited by liberty610; 13th Jan 2018 at 12:52.
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    The best Blu-ray compatible options for your source material are 1080i29.97 and 720p59.94. Motion will appear less smooth if you re-encode to 1080p29.97 or 1080p23.976. Vegas Pro should have some profiles available for Blu-ray.

    [Edit]Pulldown is useful only when starting with a 24fps source.
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  3. Thanks for the reply! I tried to a 1080i29.97 and it seems alright. Are there any benefits as far as visuals go if I lower the resolution to 720 59.94? It seems smoothness is better at higher frame rates, but Idk if I want to loose the resolution. I'll probably do my own tests with it, but I always look for other opinions. A lot of my cource material was shot free hand with some fast/not smooth pans.

    {Edit} Vegas has templates for rendering at the 1080i29.97 yo8u suggested. If I selected that, should I render it with upper field interlaced frames? Or rendering it as progressive? Will rendering it as progressive look better sence the source is already in progressive frames?
    Last edited by liberty610; 13th Jan 2018 at 14:25.
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    Originally Posted by liberty610 View Post
    Thanks for the reply! I tried to a 1080i29.97 and it seems alright. Are there any benefits as far as visuals go if I lower the resolution to 720 59.94? It seems smoothness is better at higher frame rates, but Idk if I want to loose the resolution. I'll probably do my own tests with it, but I always look for other opinions. A lot of my cource material was shot free hand with some fast/not smooth pans.

    {Edit} Vegas has templates for rendering at the 1080i29.97 yo8u suggested. If I selected that, should I render it with upper field interlaced frames? Or rendering it as progressive? Will rendering it as progressive look better sence the source is already in progressive frames?
    You should use top field first. It is more common than bottom field first.

    As I recall 720p59.94 produces a slightly smaller file size than 1080i29.97 for the same apparent quality. Other than that it is a toss up. 720p preserves more detail in the vertical dimension, while 1080i preserves more detail in the horizontal dimension.
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  5. Thanks a lot for the replies. I think I will do the 180 60i template in Vegas. Thanks again for the help!
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  6. I am not sure what advice you were given as usually_trolling is on my ignore list, but as a DVD Architect Pro 6 user who has authored numerous BD, here are my thoughts.

    First, while 1080p60/59.94 is not BD compliant, 720p59.94 is. Given that all modern displays are native progressive, I think it is a backward step to interlace (i.e. throw away half of the footage) to preserve a few extra lines of horizontal resolution that arguably aren't really there given the camera.

    Second, I strongly recommend you encode the video stream using x264. Just search Google for x264 bluray compliant and use the 720p59.94 script. The one caveat to keep in mind is that DVDA has a hard limit of 28500 kbps for the video stream and will re-encode if you exceed that. As a general rule you don't want the authoring program to encode the video or audio streams.

    I put together a thread a while back that walks through all these steps in this subforum. Just search it. It is easy to find.
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  7. Hey, thanks for the reply! This was some what like what the last reply stated, but was more leaning toward the interlaced 1080 setup.

    One thing I feel strongly about is frame rate, so I would totally want to go with the 720p setup, but I never knew what steps to take because there wasn't a rendering template in Vegas that set it up. I will definitely look up your other thread! Thanks for the reply!
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  8. 1080i30 and 720p60 have the same temporal resolution -- 60 motion increments per second. 1080i30 and 1080i60 are the same thing. Marketing started calling it the latter because it sounds twice as good. They are 30 interlaced frames per second where each frame contains two half-pictures, called fields, displayed sequentially to give 60 fields per second.

    How good the vertical resolution of the 1080i video depends on the quality of the deinterlacer in the playback device or TV. In general, still portions of the frame will retain 1920x1080 resolution, motion areas will have less, as little as 1920x540 in the worst case.

    Interlaced YV12 encoding (used on all consumer playback devices) does blur colors vertically more than progressive encoding.

    SameSelf is correct, the resolution of the picture from most camcorders doesn't come anywhere near the frame size. So reducing the resolution to 1280x720 may not even be noticeable.

    You should run tests with both and decide which looks better (given your equipment) for yourself. Your best option is to forget Blu-ray and just encode everything as 1080p60 for playback on devices that support it.
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  9. I am not a Vegas user but the question of how to best downrez your footage from 1920x1080 to 1280x720 has assuredly been answered more than once on this forum. To me, the main question is one of workflow i.e. do you downrez in Vegas or outside of Vegas in Avisynth for example?

    I am not sure I agree with jagabo's advice. Testing an interlaced vs progressive rendering requires introducing a deinterlacer and how do you control for that?
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    Interlaced video always needs to be de-interlaced for viewing on a 1920x1080 flatscreen TV but 720p video has to be upscaled to be viewed on a flatscreen TV. (They don't seem to make 1280x720 TVs. 720p TVs are 1366x768 resolution not 1280x720 and 1080p TVs are 1920x1080.)

    There are too many different players and displays for totally objective tests to be possible. Some TVs and some players can scale better than others just as some can deinterlace better than others, which means that this kind of comparison is always going to be a very individual and subjective test, not a science experiment. ...and that's OK. Subjective evaluations are still worthwhile.

    It is ridiculous to demand "controls" for this kind of test, but then again, Selfie comes here mainly to start pointless arguments for fun.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 21st Jan 2018 at 21:58.
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  11. Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    You should run tests with both and decide which looks better (given your equipment) for yourself. Your best option is to forget Blu-ray and just encode everything as 1080p60 for playback on devices that support it.
    I actually already run 1080p60 video on many projects, but for projects that require a bluray disc, I wanted to get the best possible image. Sony Vegas doesn't seem to have a template for 720p60 for Bluray, so that is where I am stuck at the moment on one of my projects.
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  12. More importantly, even if Vegas has a 1280x720p59.94 option, is it BD compliant? However, in the absence of such an option, you can always export a lossless digital intermediate (DI), and downrez in Avisynth, which I already mentioned. There are advantages to this workflow which can make it the preferred one. And since you cite the best possible image as a goal, with Avisynth, you get complete control of the resizer unlike the control you may or may not have in an NLE.

    The important thing to realize is that one is rarely if ever stuck in video post production. There are almost always other options and the challenge is choosing the best one for your needs.
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  13. Originally Posted by SameSelf View Post
    More importantly, even if Vegas has a 1280x720p59.94 option, is it BD compliant? However, in the absence of such an option, you can always export a lossless digital intermediate (DI), and downrez in Avisynth, which I already mentioned.
    I do apologize, man! I didn't see that from your earlier post. Thanks for the tip! I'll look into that next!
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  14. No worries. Unfortunately, for better or for worse, Avisynth is not for the faint of heart. The good news is that there are many, many experts on this forum, so getting help is a cinch. My advice is post a new thread on the lines of downrez to 720p from Vegas in the Video Conversion sub.
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  15. I think Vegas would not really make the quality go down while exporting 720p60 for outside encoding, so some space could be saved if exporting some lossless out of Vegas. Vegas needs to be prevented from downscaling if footage is interlaced, which is not the case here. You can do a quick comparisons but there might not be apparent differences.
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  16. Originally Posted by liberty610 View Post
    Hey everyone,

    I have not done a lot of Blu Ray authoring over the years. A lot of my authoring was on standard DVDs back in the day before HD video came into play. I am use to rendering content for internet videos on Youtube and what not, but I am looking to put my Blu Ray burner to work with projects.

    I use Vegas Pro version 14 with DVD Architect Pro 6. I am so use to working with 1080p 60fps video for online or digital media purposes, I forgot that Blu Ray does not use full 1080p. So I was wondering what my options where for 1080p output to Blu Ray.

    I currently have a 4 hour plus video project in the works that will need to be put to a multi blu ray disc output. The footage was shot in full HD on a Sony NX100 video camera. The footage is 1080p @ 60fps - 50Mb/s bit rate files. I was wondering what the best rendering options are for outputting to blu Ray discs. Is 1080i the best? Or is a pulldown method with progressive frames the better option? This is kinda new for me, as I am use to being able to just output full digital files for online or digital media use.

    I know my way around Vegas pretty well, and I am pretty savvy when it comes to video formats/containers. I have just never had full HD footage to target to blu ray before. Any help, feedback, ect would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
    The answer to your conundrum is a VERY rare thing to find, a needle in a haystack and a very frustrating one. However, it does exist. And it is this: You have to find a bluray authoring software package that supports non-standard BluRay format templates of 1080p60. The product I advise is CyberLink PowerDirector, which has a BluRay template for 1080p60 in H.264. It is only for H.264, and is not available for MPEG-2. PD is the only product I am aware of that actually allows one to create this "non-stanard" bluray authoring, and I personally think it's a great "does everything" NLE to boot. No, this isn't an advertisement, I personally don't like the company very much. But the software is VERY popular and it does solve this particular problem.

    Here's the other part that people need to understand, and I really want to rub this in for maximum annoyance and "uprising" factor:

    For many years now, most all high quality bluray players do in fact play 60p blurays just fin3e, and it is dazzling to behold. Samsungs, Sony's etc. Even Playstation 3 and 4 gaming systems play them great. Read this again, because I'm truly sick of the software industry not supporting 1080p60 when the hardware manufacturers have been supporting it for many years now, and officially list in in the specs of these players. I personally use the Samsung BD-H5900 3D Blu-Ray Disc Player, as well as Playstation 3 and 4 as well. All play the 1080p60 BluRays I create in PowerDirector.

    PowerDirector is the only product I am aware of that allows the creation of these buttery smooth, crystal clear, true progressive 1080p60 blurays. I consider interlaced anything to be unacceptable garbage, and just can't bring mysefl to stoop to any 720p60 blurays, especially when my original source video was hot in 1080p60 with 5.1 surround (Panasonic HC-V770).

    I actually joined this forum to answer this thread because I absolutely HATE how everybody STILL assumes that 1080p60 blurays are "non standard" and therefore "impossible". This has been very much not true for many years now. Why am I so passionate about this? Because I hate interlaced video with a passion due to how "interlaced" means "blurry any way you slice it no matter how good your TV is at interpolation". Interpolation doesn't fix everything, it only removes some of the blur and jitter. To put it blintly, anybody in Hollywood knows what "Garbage in, garbage out" means when it comes to source material vs output quality.

    60p blurays are critical particularly to my home movie production due to optical media being the only stable long-term storage medium that exists. Hard drives? Inevitable moving parts failure, bad sectors, and "bit rot". SD cards and USB sticks? One hot dashboard can ruin that in short order. Optical media is the only long term storage media form that exists, specifically bluray with it's sealed edges to prevent bacterial decay and delamination (CDs and DVDs are vulnerable). And these blurays have to be able to play in anyone's payer if I had them a disc - I do not want to have to explain to them how to play burned data files on a PC and what kind of codecs have to be installed to the non-techies (which is 95% of everybody).

    I know there's a lot of talk about Vegas in here, and I respect that, very much so. But the reason I'm using PD is because of one single reason above all others: it creates H.265 1080p60 blurays, which play in any decent bluray player. I have come across SO MANY threads where people are shocked to find they can't create these types of blurays. Well, you can - just barely. If only all the software vendors out there would support this!

    For the record: PowerDirector's 1080p60 blurays will hold 90 minutes of video on a 25GB bluray with menus. That's using 1080p60 source video that contains 5.1 audio. The 1080p60 blurays include that 5.1 audio in DTS 5.1. These 1080p60 blurays bounce around during playback between 26 and 35Mbps depending on detail of subject. Most all modern bluray players support playback speeds up to 40Mbps.

    The bluray authoring software industry's been asleep for too many years on this one. Time for them to snap out of it and get those templates added to their products. As a software developer myself, I can tell you that adding a template such as this to a software product could be done very easily and quickly. CyberLink figured this out years ago and did something about it. Really surprised nobody else has. Would love to see other products add 1080p60 teplates to their BD authoring capabilities.
    Last edited by Highwinder; 27th May 2018 at 22:44.
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    Originally Posted by Highwinder View Post
    The answer to your conundrum is a VERY rare thing to find, a needle in a haystack and a very frustrating one. However, it does exist. And it is this: You have to find a bluray authoring software package that supports non-standard BluRay format templates of 1080p60. The product I advise is CyberLink PowerDirector, which has a BluRay template for 1080p60 in H.264. It is only for H.264, and is not available for MPEG-2. PD is the only product I am aware of that actually allows one to create this "non-stanard" bluray authoring, and I personally think it's a great "does everything" NLE to boot. No, this isn't an advertisement, I personally don't like the company very much. But the software is VERY popular and it does solve this particular problem.

    Here's the other part that people need to understand, and I really want to rub this in for maximum annoyance and "uprising" factor:

    For many years now, most all high quality bluray players do in fact play 60p blurays just fin3e, and it is dazzling to behold. Samsungs, Sony's etc. Even Playstation 3 and 4 gaming systems play them great. Read this again, because I'm truly sick of the software industry not supporting 1080p60 when the hardware manufacturers have been supporting it for many years now, and officially list in in the specs of these players. I personally use the Samsung BD-H5900 3D Blu-Ray Disc Player, as well as Playstation 3 and 4 as well. All play the 1080p60 BluRays I create in PowerDirector.

    PowerDirector is the only product I am aware of that allows the creation of these buttery smooth, crystal clear, true progressive 1080p60 blurays. I consider interlaced anything to be unacceptable garbage, and just can't bring mysefl to stoop to any 720p60 blurays, especially when my original source video was hot in 1080p60 with 5.1 surround (Panasonic HC-V770).

    I actually joined this forum to answer this thread because I absolutely HATE how everybody STILL assumes that 1080p60 blurays are "non standard" and therefore "impossible". This has been very much not true for many years now. Why am I so passionate about this? Because I hate interlaced video with a passion due to how "interlaced" means "blurry any way you slice it no matter how good your TV is at interpolation". Interpolation doesn't fix everything, it only removes some of the blur and jitter. To put it blintly, anybody in Hollywood knows what "Garbage in, garbage out" means when it comes to source material vs output quality.

    60p blurays are critical particularly to my home movie production due to optical media being the only stable long-term storage medium that exists. Hard drives? Inevitable moving parts failure, bad sectors, and "bit rot". SD cards and USB sticks? One hot dashboard can ruin that in short order. Optical media is the only long term storage media form that exists, specifically bluray with it's sealed edges to prevent bacterial decay and delamination (CDs and DVDs are vulnerable). And these blurays have to be able to play in anyone's payer if I had them a disc - I do not want to have to explain to them how to play burned data files on a PC and what kind of codecs have to be installed to the non-techies (which is 95% of everybody).

    I know there's a lot of talk about Vegas in here, and I respect that, very much so. But the reason I'm using PD is because of one single reason above all others: it creates H.265 1080p60 blurays, which play in any decent bluray player. I have come across SO MANY threads where people are shocked to find they can't create these types of blurays. Well, you can - just barely. If only all the software vendors out there would support this!

    For the record: PowerDirector's 1080p60 blurays will hold 90 minutes of video on a 25GB bluray with menus. That's using 1080p60 source video that contains 5.1 audio. The 1080p60 blurays include that 5.1 audio in DTS 5.1. These 1080p60 blurays bounce around during playback between 26 and 35Mbps depending on detail of subject. Most all modern bluray players support playback speeds up to 40Mbps.

    The bluray authoring software industry's been asleep for too many years on this one. Time for them to snap out of it and get those templates added to their products. As a software developer myself, I can tell you that adding a template such as this to a software product could be done very easily and quickly. CyberLink figured this out years ago and did something about it. Really surprised nobody else has. Would love to see other products add 1080p60 teplates to their BD authoring capabilities.
    1080p60 is definitely non-standard for Blu-ray because it isn't included in the BDA's official documents specifying the characteristics permitted for Blu-ray video. The Blu-ray standard defines what all Blu-ray players must be able to play in order to receive certification and licensing from the Blu-ray Disc Association. Blu-ray players are not required to play anything outside the spec and there are probably some Blu-ray players still around which can't play your off-spec discs.

    The Blu-ray standard was written for compatibility with the HDTVs that most people owned the mid-2000's and hasn't changed much, if at all, since then. Maybe you don't remember what it was like at that time, but when the first consumer Blu-ray player was released in 2006, if someone had an HDTV at all, it was a 1080i or 720p TV. The very first HDTVs capable of accepting 1080p60 video input were just being released, and HDMI had only been available on HDTVs for a couple of years.

    it creates H.265 1080p60 blurays
    I hope that's a typo. Regular Blu-ray players won't decode HEVC.

    The UHD Blu-ray spec does allow both 1080p60 and h.265, but consumer authoring software does yet not exist for UHD Blu-ray because the current spec for UHD Blu-ray only covers pressed discs. Cyberlink said they will consider creating consumer authoring software for UHD Blu-ray when the BDA finishes their upcoming spec for burned UHD Blu-ray. As far as I have been able to find out, that hasn't happened yet.

    [Edit]In order to receive a license from the BDA for Blu-ray authoring, Cyberlink is supposed to adhere to the Blu-ray spec too. I don't have a recent edition of PowerDirector, but I suspect that your version of PowerDirector's ability to author 1080p60 on Blu-ray is a bug, not a feature, and might be removed at a later date.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 28th May 2018 at 09:03. Reason: clarity
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  18. Nope, not a typo. And your reply is very typical of why people are still in the dark about this.

    I repeat: The fact that 1080p60 is not a standard BluRay format hasn't been stopping hardware manufactourers from producing 1080p60-compliant players anyway. They have ignored the standard and produced it anyway, unofficially adding to the standard, and have been doing so for AT LEAST the last 5 years. It's time people woke up about this.

    Playstation 3 plays 1080p60 blurays.
    Playstation 4 plays 1080p60 blurays.
    Most all modern Samsung and Sony bluray players play 1080p60 blurays.

    CyberLink PowerDirector (all versions after 12 I believe) create 1080p60 blurays that play fine on these devices. See the included screen shot I just took from PowerDirector 16.

    You could be making and playing 1080p60 blurays - or you can sit there in disbelief, quoting old bluray standards, and NOT making or playing them.
    Last edited by Highwinder; 28th May 2018 at 12:17.
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  19. Originally Posted by Highwinder View Post
    Nope, not a typo. And your reply is very typical of why people are still in the dark about this.

    I repeat: The fact that 1080p60 is not a standard BluRay format hasn't been stopping hardware manufactourers from producing 1080p60-compliant players anyway. They have ignored the standard and produced it anyway, unofficially adding to the standard, and have been doing so for AT LEAST the last 5 years. It's time people woke up about this.

    Playstation 3 plays 1080p60 blurays.
    Playstation 4 plays 1080p60 blurays.
    Most all modern Samsung and Sony bluray players play 1080p60 blurays.

    CyberLink PowerDirector (all versions after 12 I believe) create 1080p60 blurays that play fine on these devices. See the included screen shot I just took from PowerDirector 16.

    You could be making and playing 1080p60 blurays - or you can sit there in disbelief, quoting old bluray standards, and NOT making or playing them.

    You're mistaken

    It's AVCHD v2.0 spec , not a real blu-ray. Look at the bitrates (28MB/s) in your screenshot
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AVCHD#Specification_addendum_(AVCHD_2.0)

    FACT: The PS3 and 50% of BD players will stutter for 1080p59.94 with authored BD using 40Mb/s , even though they can might be able to play it as data disc or from USB. Some won't even play it back , it will say "invalid format" or something like that. Many but can play AVCHD2.0 28Mb/s discs . Not Blu-ray.
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  20. Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    1080p60 is definitely non-standard for Blu-ray because it isn't included in the BDA's official documents specifying the characteristics permitted for Blu-ray video. The Blu-ray standard defines what all Blu-ray players must be able to play in order to receive certification and licensing from the Blu-ray Disc Association. Blu-ray players are not required to play anything outside the spec and there are probably some Blu-ray players still around which can't play your off-spec discs.
    [...]
    The UHD Blu-ray spec does allow both 1080p60 and h.265, but consumer authoring software does yet not exist for UHD Blu-ray because the current spec for UHD Blu-ray only covers pressed discs.
    Aren't all non-encrypted and burned Blu-Rays non-standard? There is AVCHD but that's a separate thing from the Blu-Rays you buy in a store and I'm not sure supporting it is mandatory for a Blu-Ray license. People wait for some kind of spec-conformant way to create UHD Blu-Rays but it has never been possible for consumers even for the normal Blu-Ray.
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    Originally Posted by sneaker View Post
    Aren't all non-encrypted and burned Blu-Rays non-standard? There is AVCHD but that's a separate thing from the Blu-Rays you buy in a store and I'm not sure supporting it is mandatory for a Blu-Ray license. People wait for some kind of spec-conformant way to create UHD Blu-Rays but it has never been possible for consumers even for the normal Blu-Ray.
    This is the first I've heard that authored Blu-ray on burned media isn't governed by some kind of official spec, although if I recall correctly, some early Blu-ray players only recognize pressed Blu-ray discs. Maybe someone who has seen the official spec will chime in.

    You are correct that support for AVCHD discs isn't mandatory for a licensed Blu-ray player.
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    Originally Posted by Highwinder View Post
    Nope, not a typo. And your reply is very typical of why people are still in the dark about this.
    I'm in the dark? You wrote: "it creates H.265 1080p60 blurays". H.265 is also known as HEVC. Blu-ray supports the use of H.264 (A.K.A. AVC), MPEG-2 and VC-1 for video. H.265 is definitely NOT allowed for Blu-ray. I haven't yet seen a stand-alone Blu-ray player that can play HEVC from a USB stick, let alone from an authored disc of some sort. AVCHD and AVCHD 2.0 discs don't support the use of HEVC either.


    Originally Posted by Highwinder View Post
    You could be making and playing 1080p60 blurays
    No. That can't happen, even using PowerDirector. ...but apparently I could be making and playing AVCHD 2.0 disks burned on BD-R media with H.264 1080p60 video, assuming I had a Blu-ray player that supports AVCHD 2.0 disks at 1080p60.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 28th May 2018 at 14:21.
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    @Highwinder. You can put pilchards in to a sardine tin. But that does not turn then in to sardines. Same that putting non Blu-ray compliant video on to a BD disk does not make it a Blu Ray disk.

    It makes no difference if your players can play these disks - perhaps you should also read the support formats of these players as well.

    Finally, check your folder/file structure of these disks and compare it to the folder/file structure as reported in 'What is' on the top of this page. If it does not match that of Blu Ray, but matches that of AVCHD, that is the end of this discussion.
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    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by sneaker View Post
    Aren't all non-encrypted and burned Blu-Rays non-standard? There is AVCHD but that's a separate thing from the Blu-Rays you buy in a store and I'm not sure supporting it is mandatory for a Blu-Ray license. People wait for some kind of spec-conformant way to create UHD Blu-Rays but it has never been possible for consumers even for the normal Blu-Ray.
    This is the first I've heard that authored Blu-ray on burned media isn't governed by some kind of official spec, although if I recall correctly, some early Blu-ray players only recognize pressed Blu-ray discs. Maybe someone who has seen the official spec will chime in.

    You are correct that support for AVCHD discs isn't mandatory for a licensed Blu-ray player.
    No, there is an official spec for each/all the formats: General, Physical (pt1), Logical/FileSystem (pt2), and Application (pt3), on BD-ROM, BD-R, and BD-RE.

    Nowhere except in UltraHD (ROM-only) does it say 1080p60 is ok.

    That screenshot is interesting, but I'm not all that surprised that Cyberlink got it mixed up. Notice it sets the bitrate at 28Mbps (hint: AVCHD). That would look pretty mediocre for true original-camera 1080p60 material with any motion.

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    I just stumbled across this thread while googling for 1080p 60fps video for Blu-ray. Thought I'd share some related experience of mine.

    What Highwinder is saying is absolutely true, and I share his frustration very much when seeing wrong info here and there.

    When someone asks "Can I make a Blu-ray with 1080p60fps video?" the answer is of course "Yes you absolutely definitely can", and then you can add "- but it's not part of the official specs (from 15 years ago)".

    A while back I wanted to put my personal family video recordings on Blu-ray - but they were all recorded at 1080p@30fps - another non-standard Blu-ray. So I decided to investigate: I created a disc with a lot of 1080p@30fps video and another disc with a lot of 1080p@29,97fps.

    The results: Almost all players I tested on (more than 30 different old and new players), would play the 1080p@29,97fps fine.
    And only very few players refused to play the 1080p@30fps disc.

    So in my experience, 29,97fps is to prefer over 30fps. I'm guessing the same will apply to 59,94fps vs 60fps. So I will be using 59,94 fps in my upcoming project.

    EDIT: Looking at most replies in this thread I can see I better add this too: My discs are absolutely 100% compliant Blu-ray discs, with BDMV structure and even a Java Blu-ray Disc Xlet running as menu (which you can't do with AVCHD - so you know I'm not talking about AVCHD here). So there's no doubt that my test revealed that 99% of players had no problem playing a Blu-ray Disc with 1080p@29,97fps video.


    PowerDirector isn't the only way you can create a non-old-specs Blu-ray M2TS file. I'm doing all of my Blu-ray authoring on Linux, where I'm using tsMuxer to create any kind of stream I want. And I code my menus in Java. Blu-ray is awesome.
    Last edited by mr_lou; 17th Jul 2018 at 01:20.
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    Originally Posted by mr_lou View Post
    I just stumbled across this thread while googling for 1080p 60fps video for Blu-ray. Thought I'd share some related experience of mine.

    What Highwinder is saying is absolutely true, and I share his frustration very much when seeing wrong info here and there.

    When someone asks "Can I make a Blu-ray with 1080p60fps video?" the answer is of course "Yes you absolutely definitely can", and then you can add "- but it's not part of the official specs (from 15 years ago)".

    A while back I wanted to put my personal family video recordings on Blu-ray - but they were all recorded at 1080p@30fps - another non-standard Blu-ray. So I decided to investigate: I created a disc with a lot of 1080p@30fps video and another disc with a lot of 1080p@29,97fps.

    The results: Almost all players I tested on (more than 30 different old and new players), would play the 1080p@29,97fps fine.
    And only very few players refused to play the 1080p@30fps disc.

    So in my experience, 29,97fps is to prefer over 30fps. I'm guessing the same will apply to 59,94fps vs 60fps. So I will be using 59,94 fps in my upcoming project.

    EDIT: Looking at most replies in this thread I can see I better add this too: My discs are absolutely 100% compliant Blu-ray discs, with BDMV structure and even a Java Blu-ray Disc Xlet running as menu (which you can't do with AVCHD - so you know I'm not talking about AVCHD here). So there's no doubt that my test revealed that 99% of players had no problem playing a Blu-ray Disc with 1080p@29,97fps video.


    PowerDirector isn't the only way you can create a non-old-specs Blu-ray M2TS file. I'm doing all of my Blu-ray authoring on Linux, where I'm using tsMuxer to create any kind of stream I want. And I code my menus in Java. Blu-ray is awesome.
    Spreading the same misinformation across multiple threads does not make it true. Fact check: If a disc contains off-spec video, it can't legitimately be called a Blu-ray disc, even if it plays on many Blu-ray players.

    Also, I should point out that BDA-licensed authoring Blu-ray software is required to do verification which prevents creating a Blu-ray disc containing off-spec video in order to ensure the software's output is compatible with any Blu-ray player. 1080p@29.97fps video will pass verification if it is encoded as interlaced or uses the fake interlaced flag, which makes compliant with the Blu-ray spec. 1080p59.94 won't pass verification for Blu-ray if one is using licensed software. If the software allows AVCHD 2.0 authoring, as recent versions of PowerDVD do, someone could produce a 1080p59.94 AVCHD disc instead.

    tsMuxer is unlicensed authoring software which doesn't verify that video or audio is compliant in every respect with the Blu-ray spec. tsMuxer can be used to make off spec discs but makes no promise that the discs it creates will be playable on using every Blu-ray player. Playability is entirely dependent on the flexibility of the hardware in the Blu-ray player.
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    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Spreading the same misinformation across multiple threads does not make it true. Fact check: If a disc contains off-spec video, it can't legitimately be called a Blu-ray disc, even if it plays on many Blu-ray players.
    Agreed. Instead of spreading misinformation, it's probably best to take a look at the Blu-ray Disc Associations own licensing website and see what they write.
    Here you go: http://www.blu-raydisc.info/logo-faq.php

    In short, they say it's fine to put "Blu-ray Disc TM" on a disc even if it doesn't meet the specs.

    The Blu-ray logo is what represents a compliant disc. All other discs are still fine to call "Blu-ray Disc", as long as you don't use the logo to do so.
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    Originally Posted by mr_lou View Post
    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Spreading the same misinformation across multiple threads does not make it true. Fact check: If a disc contains off-spec video, it can't legitimately be called a Blu-ray disc, even if it plays on many Blu-ray players.
    Agreed. Instead of spreading misinformation, it's probably best to take a look at the Blu-ray Disc Associations own licensing website and see what they write.
    Here you go: http://www.blu-raydisc.info/logo-faq.php

    In short, they say it's fine to put "Blu-ray Disc TM" on a disc even if it doesn't meet the specs.

    The Blu-ray logo is what represents a compliant disc. All other discs are still fine to call "Blu-ray Disc", as long as you don't use the logo to do so.
    Notice that the BDA explicitly states that compatibility (and therefore playability) is not guaranteed for this type of disc. From their perspective, using the words "Blu-ray Disc TM" only means that some type of BD media was used to contain the video.

    I doubt that most consumers understand that this distinction between "Blu-ray TM" with a logo (used for pressed Blu-ray) and "Blu-ray Disc TM" exists.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 18th Jul 2018 at 12:06.
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    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Notice that the BDA explicitly states that playability is not guaranteed for this type of disc. From their perspective, using the words "Blu-ray Disc TM" only means that some type of burned BD media was used to contain the video.
    And no one ever denied that. All I said was that Highwinder's disc was a Blu-ray Disc. And now you know that it is. So we can end the discussion now.

    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    I doubt that most consumers understand that this distinction between "Blu-ray TM" with a logo (used for pressed Blu-ray) and "Blu-ray Disc TM" exists.
    Some people in this very forum clearly doesn't understand this distinction.
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