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  1. Hello.
    I'm new here and could use some help. I came across some really old home videos in my late grandfathers things. Most are VHSC and I also found two regular VHS tapes. I bought a vidbox and borrowed a VCR and ordered a VHSC adapter to begin converting the tapes onto my computer. I converted the two VHS tapes with no problem a couple weeks ago, other than the poor quality from them being so old. I just received my VHSC adapter in the mail today and when I plugged the VCR into the TV it wouldn't play on the TV. Blue screen and no audio. The TV is a 10 year old Panasonic flat screen. So I plug the VCR into the Vidbox and into the computer like I had before with the two normal size VHS tapes. I can hear the audio on the tapes clear as day, but all I get it a blue screen for video. I'm connecting through red, white, and yellow jacks. Connections are fine, and the tapes are in decent shape. I cleaned the VCR head and still have had no luck. The tapes were recorded on an old JVC camcorder that I still have. When I put the tapes in the camcorder I can see that they still play. I tried to run the camcorder through the t.v. before with a svideo to aux converter that my grandfather had with the camera, but that wouldn't work at all. I bought a new svideo cable before ordering the adapter, but the new svideo cable wouldn't fit in the svideo port on the old camera which is why I ordered the adapter. I'm pretty sure it's the adapter. I'm really pulling my hair out on this one between the money and time invested. Anyone here have any ideas? FYI the VHSC adapter I got is a Konig if that helps. I just need to run it to the computer. Thank you.
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  2. The first thing to do is to get those two VHS tapes and try to play them again, using whatever your current setup is. They played once a few days ago, so you know they are good. It is really important to start eliminating possible problems one-by-one. If those tapes don't play, then there is something bad in your new set of connections.

    While anything is possible, it seems very unlikely that a VHS-C adapter would cause just the video to be blanked. I guess it is possible that it could be so badly-made that it causes the tape to track badly, only passing the linear audio track. With really bad tracking, this can happen.

    Here are a few things to try.

    First, see if there is a setting on either your VCR or TV (try the VCR first) that turns off the blue screen. That color is generated by the VCR or TV when it gets a signal that is really poor, so you don't have to look at snow. I have never liked the idea of putting up a blue screen instead of the weak signal because I want to see whatever lousy signal is being produced so I can correct it, if possible. In this case, if you have a tracking problem, once you turn off the blue screen, you should be able to see snow. If also you see some sort of residual picture, no matter how screwed up or faint, then you can begin to play around with the manual tracking control on your VCR and see if you can "tune in" a decent picture.

    After you download the manual for your VCR to learn how to do this, you should also see if your VCR has automatic tracking and other settings that can be turned on and off. Normally you want auto-tracking turned on, and that is usually the default, but you never know. On some VCRs this is a front panel switch which enables/disables tracking, and if so, and if it is set to manual, and the manual tracking is set wrong, you would get exactly the result you describe.

    So, the adapter is fairly far down on my list of likely suspects, but do test the two full-sized VHS tapes to see what you get.

    Another possibility is that the VHS-C tapes are bad. I have not yet see an entire batch of tapes go bad, but I certainly have seen some tapes from a group that was stored in bad conditions that didn't play very well.
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  3. Member
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    Originally Posted by justneedvhshelp View Post
    I tried to run the camcorder through the t.v. before with a svideo to aux converter that my grandfather had with the camera, but that wouldn't work at all. I bought a new svideo cable before ordering the adapter, but the new svideo cable wouldn't fit in the svideo port on the old camera which is why I ordered the adapter.
    You're likely to get the best results playing these tapes on the camcorder that made them. What model is it?
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  4. it's a JVC GR-A30. It's at least 30 years old. If I put the VHSC tapes in it I can watch them from the eye view on the camera, but the camera doesn't have audio playback. So I can hear the audio through the VCR and I can see the video through the camcorder playback, and I used the same tape in both those results so I know the tape is good. I will check to see if the regular VHS tapes will play again, but I'm confident they will. I had no issue playing them before. I just ordered this: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B016S7P8AA/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    I believe it should be able to run the camcorder to the converter. If anyone thinks otherwise please let me know. Thank you.
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  5. Member
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    Before you load the cassettes into the adapter, make sure that there is no slack inside by turning the exposed white gear wheel. (Don't overdo it, just make sure there's no slack.)

    Beyond that, you'll have to open up the VCR and see what's happening inside. Might have to keep the lights down low so you don't trigger the tape-out sensors (or you can cover them up).
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  6. I did that. The tapes are in good shape.
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