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  1. Member
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    I tried playing the sample of Elysium off 4K samples with MPC-BE & the video stutters & cpu usage is 99-100% according to task man.

    My cpu is an older i7 870 stock at 2.9ghz. I tried this vid on another semi decent laptop & the stuttering & usage is crazy high to.

    Why is the usage so high? Other 4K videos barley use 25%.
    If this is so high, How would modern quad cores perform? Would they generate alot of heat?
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  2. Member
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    To playback HEVC you need a top notch CPU, That is if you software decode. A high end i7 might not even be enough..
    If you have a graphics card that can hardware decode HEVC you need al lot less cpu like i5 or even a high end i3 will do.
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  3. Member
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    A NVIDIA GT 1030 (2GB VRAM) could provide 10-bit HEVC hardware acceleration for playing video files at a reasonable price. However, you would need a NVIDIA GTX 1050 Ti to meet the memory requirement (at least 3GB VRAM) if you want to subscribe to Netflix 4K.

    [Edit]The GPUs in Kaby Lake and upcoming Coffee Lake i3, i5, and i7 series CPUs can also provide 10-bit HEVC hardware acceleration. However not many motherboards provide HDMI 2.0 (required for HDR 10 + 2160p60fps) and HDCP 2.2 (required for commercial streaming services). The above NVIDIA GPUs also provide HDMI 2.0 and HDCP 2.2.

    UHD Blu-ray playback requires Kaby Lake or Coffee Lake i5 or i7 series CPUs plus a motherboard with HDMI 2.0 and HDCP 2.2 and SGX support. Graphics cards can't be used for UHD Blu-ray playback because of the requirement for SGX.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 13th Sep 2017 at 12:56.
    Ignore list: hello_hello, tried
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  4. Member
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    Well I have to read up more when I get a chance, but it seems like the jump from h.264 to h.265 is only a small increase in PQ but 10X more demanding just so they can fit those 4K movies on a BD disc. And force old desktops to be completley upgraded.

    I watched two Elysium trailers in 4K, one was good old h.264 & ran perfect smooth & only looked a tad softer to my eyes image quality vs. the HEVC version.

    Also some 4K trailers online in H.264 like honey bees look absolutely amazing, so the codec looks to be only as good as the camera being used.


    Does anyone think if I overclock to around 4GHz with good cooler would play these HEVC 4K alright?
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    I don't think that overclocking would be of much help, but you could try.
    Though air cooling might not be enough so water cooling is almost a must.

    I would stick to H264 for now or buy one of the above suggested NVIDIA GPU'S

    Personally i think that the biggest advantage of H265 is for streaming services like Netflix, Slightly better picture quality but at roughly half the file size
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  6. Member
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    Originally Posted by jan5678 View Post
    I don't think that overclocking would be of much help, but you could try.
    Though air cooling might not be enough so water cooling is almost a must.

    I would stick to H264 for now or buy one of the above suggested NVIDIA GPU'S

    Personally i think that the biggest advantage of H265 is for streaming services like Netflix, Slightly better picture quality but at roughly half the file size
    I have the GTX970 on my system (it's not officially supported on vista, but plays my older games no probs). When playing back the 4K HEVC video according to gpuz there is a moderate load on GPU averaging around 15-25% i think, while CPU is 95% usage average. I have experimented with settings in MP-HC GPU acceleration & all settings the video stutters.

    Does this mean the CPU just needs some more speed or maybe it means not much? Just curious.
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    It simply means that your CPU is doing all the decoding work, hence the high usage.

    With proper hardware acceleration this would be reversed, the GPU will do all the work instead of the CPU
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    Something I neglected to mention in my other post: Windows 10 is listed as a requirement for both 4K Netflix and UHD Blu-ray playback. Microsoft only supports Windows 10 with Kaby Lake and later Intel CPUs and the required NVIDIA driver (GeForce 384 Series Driver) which allows 10 series GPUs with 3GB+ of VRAM to work for 4K Netflix with any CPU, is for Windows 10. http://www.nvidia.com/download/driverResults.aspx/120486/en-us

    Other paid 4K streaming services may have different requirements, but it's possible that Vista won't be supported for 4K or that streaming their 4K material isn't supported for PCs at all. Potential subscribers will have to look at the hardware and software requirements before signing up.
    Ignore list: hello_hello, tried
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  9. Member
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    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Something I neglected to mention in my other post: Windows 10 is listed as a requirement for both 4K Netflix and UHD Blu-ray playback. Microsoft only supports Windows 10 with Kaby Lake and later Intel CPUs and the required NVIDIA driver (GeForce 384 Series Driver) which allows 10 series GPUs with 3GB+ of VRAM to work for 4K Netflix with any CPU, is for Windows 10. http://www.nvidia.com/download/driverResults.aspx/120486/en-us

    Other paid 4K streaming services may have different requirements, but it's possible that Vista won't be supported for 4K or that streaming their 4K material isn't supported for PCs at all. Potential subscribers will have to look at the hardware and software requirements before signing up.
    Thanks.

    The only time I would get into 4K ultraHD is when their is a ripper & I can just play the mkv. Also services like netflix look to be just the popular stuff & none that I really care for, even 1080p Blu-ray lacks as many as half my dvds.
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    Originally Posted by Gurd99 View Post
    The only time I would get into 4K ultraHD is when their is a ripper & I can just play the mkv. Also services like netflix look to be just the popular stuff & none that I really care for, even 1080p Blu-ray lacks as many as half my dvds.
    In that case, you should wait.

    I have been experimenting with 4K on my present Haswell i5 computer, although the iGPU and HDMI 1.4 are limited to 30fps with 2160p video. The iGPU provides H.264 hardware acceleration, but only partial 8-bit HEVC hardware acceleration. H.264 plays smoothly. HEVC does not.
    Ignore list: hello_hello, tried
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