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  1. Hello,

    I recently ripped a commercial DVD into an MKV file. The original DVD plays as full 16:9 on my TV and Windows desktop computer (using VLC) and the ripped MKV file also displays in this format on my computer. I would like to convert the MKV back to DVD or Blu-Ray format and re-burn it. I used the AVS Video converter to convert the MKV to both DVD and Blu-Ray format, but the resulting DVD and Blu-Ray files are in 4:3 format when played back on VLC.

    The AVS Video converter indicates that the MKV input file is in uncompressed RGB with a 720x480 frame size, PAR 32/27, a frame rate of 29.97f/s, and a bit rate of 5329kbps. In the AVS Video converter I selected 16:9 as the output format and tried both "Original" and "16:9" as the input. It seems to me that if the MKV is 16:9 I should be able to produce a similar DVD or Blu-Ray. As you can obviously tell, I don't really know much about all of this so any information would be welcomed. If I can get this issue resolved I'd eventually like to add a menu to the DVD or Blu-Ray files before actually burning. If there is some application more suitable than AVS Video converter for converting to DVD or Blu-Ray I'm open to all suggestions in that regard too.

    Thanks,
    Ray
    Last edited by Geek99; 13th Aug 2017 at 23:08. Reason: add more information
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  2. Member hech54's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Geek99 View Post
    I used the AVS Video converter to convert the MKV to both DVD and Blu-Ray format
    NOT a good idea.....I'll even go so far as saying that was a DUMB idea. If you went from DVD straight to MKV....the video inside the MKV file is untouched DVD quality....absolutely no need to use any kind of "encoder" on it.
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  3. My goal is to make a DVD or Blu-Ray from the ripped MKV. I've got several such MKVs I'd like to put on a single Blu-Ray. If there is no need to re-encode these MKVs how do I get them into DVD or Blu-Ray format?
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  4. If you were correct in using the word 'ripped' for the MKV, then hech54 is correct - it's the same untouched DVD inside that MKV file. I suspect, however, that you're using 'ripped' to mean 'converted' and it's not the same DVD.

    If it's not the DVD inside that MKV, then go back to your original DVD you used to create that MKV. No need for the double conversion.
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  5. I'm sorry but I was obviously not clear on my procedure or goals. I was merely trying to simplify to avoid being overly verbose. Here is more detail...

    I have several different DVDs and I would like to make a new single DVD (or possibly Blu-Ray) consisting of things from each of original DVDs. When any of these original DVDs are played either on my TV via my Sony Blu-Ray player they appear as a well-proportioned (not-stretched) full screen 16:9 picture. They also appear this way on my computer using VLC. I used MakeMKV to extract the MKV files from each of the original DVDs. All of these extracted MKVs also appear as a well-proportioned (not-stretched) full screen 16:9 picture on my computer using VLC.

    When I convert any of these MKVs to DVD format using AVS Video converter, however, they no longer appear as a well-proportioned (not-stretched) full screen 16:9 on my computer using VLC or on my TV if I burn them to a DVD. On my computer they instead appear more like a square picture with black bars on the sides while on the TV the picture has black bars around all of it. If I instead convert the extracted MKVs to MP4s using HandBrake before converting them to DVD format with AVS Video converter, the resulting DVD format looks correct both on my TV and computer. I would somehow like to skip the conversion from MKV to MP4 and go directly from MKV to DVD (or Blu-Ray), but therein lies my problem since skipping that step currently gives the wrong picture shape/size. HandBrake indicates that the source MKVs are all 720x480, PAR 32/27.

    Thanks for your patience,
    Ray
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  6. Member hech54's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Geek99 View Post
    When I convert any of these MKVs to DVD format using AVS Video converter, however, they no longer appear as a well-proportioned
    Again......NOT a good idea to use a converter(AVS Video converter) when no conversion is necessary.
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  7. hech54

    You have already made it perfectly clear that converting when no conversion is necessary is DUMB idea. However, I can assure you I am not stupid enough to think that unnecessary conversions are a desirable thing so there's no need for you to repeat it for a third time. Instead, could you provide something constructive and tell a newbie how you would go about creating a new single DVD or Blu-Ray from the contents of several other DVDs without some sort of conversion? For example, would you first extract the contents of the original DVDs losslessly with something like MakeMKV? If not, what would you do? If so, then what would you do to get these various MKVs into single DVD format without encountering the black bar issues I previously described? What would you do to get these various MKVs into single Blu-Ray format without encountering the issues I previously described?

    Ray
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    Regarding Blu-ray, it is likely that there is no need to convert the video or audio from the MKV produced by MakeMKV, but don't expect to put more than between 5 and 6 hours of video from commercial DVDs on one 25GB BD-R without converting the video from MPEG-2 to H.264.

    If you want the Blu-ray disc to play in virtually all Blu-ray players, or if you want a menu, then the video and audio must be authored before burning to BD-R. ...but if you don't need a menu, many Blu-ray players have the ability to play MKV files burned as data to BD-R.

    If you want to author a Blu-ray disc, there is a fair amount of overlap between the DVD spec and Blu-ray spec for SD video:

    MPEG-2 video is allowed for both DVD and Blu-ray.

    Video at 720480 29.97 frames interlaced / 59.94 fields (4:3/16:9) or 720576 25 frames interlaced / 50 fields (4:3/16:9) is allowed for both DVD and Blu-ray.

    Both DVD and Blu-ray allow audio at 48000 Hz, 32 - 1536 Kbit/s, with up to 8 audio tracks containing Dolby Digital, DTS, or LPCM (uncompressed audio).

    Good Blu-ray authoring software should be able to author without converting. I think PowerDirector 15 Ultra could do the job. It is the only consumer Blu-ray and DVD editing + authoring software I know of which allows menu creation and permits DTS audio for authoring.
    Ignore list: hello_hello, tried
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  9. Originally Posted by Geek99 View Post
    I used MakeMKV to extract the MKV files from each of the original DVDs.
    Ah, so you did use MakeMKV on them. Still an unnecessary step. You say you're collecting pieces of several DVDs to make some sort of a single compilation DVD, right?

    So, open one or more of the VOB files from an original DVD in MPEG2Cut2. Use the [ and ] buttons to isolate the part you want and save it. It'll create MPGs. Nothing is reencoded. Once you have the MPGs you want, open them in AvsToDVD and have it author them to a single DVD, perhaps with a rudimentary menu. Make sure it doesn't reencode already DVD-compliant audio and video.

    That's one way, anyway. If I'm understanding correctly.
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  10. manono,

    That seems like the answer. I didn't realize that I could do that with VOB files. Thanks.

    Ray
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