VideoHelp Forum

Our website is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors.
Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker or buy a VSO converter software :)
+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2
FirstFirst 1 2
Results 31 to 34 of 34
Thread
  1. Originally Posted by KarMa View Post
    That's the thing, I really don't see it mattering much for completely DC electronics (which would include standard computers). So if you try to play a VCR with one leg and your computer capturing the video is on the other leg, it really should not technically matter.
    High frequency noise on the AC power can get into the analog portion of your signal, if you are unlucky. I have experienced this at least twice that I can remember: once with a little home recording setup that buzzed whenever the construction site next door powered up their circular saw; later in a large multi-studio post-production environment that had a bad HF spike on its incoming power, that caused a very faint hum bar that nobody noticed for a long time until it was caught by a major client (ouch). Both problems resolved through careful single-point grounding.
    Quote Quote  
  2. Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by betwixt View Post
    I've worked in electronics, including power distribution systems for half a century and can quite categorically state it is complete bunkum and a scam. The web site is full of technical nonsense, refers to measurement units that don't exist and curious regulations from various places that probably (=shouldn't) exist. Referring to 'Volts per second' is like saying 'feet per cubic gallon'.
    Only one part makes sense:
    At 60 Hz the filters act as capacitors and normally marginally improve the power factor of the customer load, which are normally slightly inductive.
    which reveals what is inside the boxes - a capacitor. You can buy one at a fraction of the cost of one of the filters but in almost every case it will be completely ineffective anyway and in most countries there are laws about permissible 'power factor' limits which would make the filter worsen conditions instead of making them better. For anyone who doesn't understand power factor, as simply as I can explain it: AC voltage and currents change over time, typically cycling through positive and negative peaks either 50 or 60 times a second, power factor is a measure of the skew between the two as in some loads the current may peak slightly earlier or later than the voltage. As power (in Watts or VA) is calculated by multiplying voltage and current together, if the two don't coincide the wrong result is reached, the power factor can be used to correct the figure.

    As for eliminating interference on video or audio equipment, unless you have some very serious issues with your house wiring, these things will make no difference whatsoever but might increase your electricity bills.

    Brian.
    That pretty much nails it. I'd also add that the power supply in any decent piece of gear will reject noise anyway.
    Quote Quote  
  3. Originally Posted by KarMa View Post
    That's the thing, I really don't see it mattering much for completely DC electronics (which would include standard computers). So if you try to play a VCR with one leg and your computer capturing the video is on the other leg, it really should not technically matter.
    It can be wrong assumption - depend how device (equipment) is grounded and how EMI/RFI suppression filter topology looks - very common issue called https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ground_loop_%28electricity%29 - best is powering devices from same point (so use power bar connected to one wall receptacle ) also plugs must be oriented in same way in power bar (i know in US this is impossible almost but in Europe with Schuko connector type it is common that L and N can be swapped between devices).
    Quote Quote  



Similar Threads