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  1. Member
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    Hey everyone, Im new to the BluRay Authoring world.

    Last night I tried to burn a BluRay disk

    - First ever attempt

    I may need to buy a dedicated BluRay Player, but at the moment I have the Pioneer drive and the video wont play on there. I tried it in my Xbox One and no luck there. It seems like theres SO many different types of settings and maybe the burner drive and Xbox cant read it...?

    Do I need to do any pre-burning formatting?

    Heres what I used and the settings:

    Pioneer BluRay Burner BDR-XD05S
    Verbartim BD-R 25GB 6X Speed

    Burner Software: Wondershare DVD Creator
    Software Settings: (Selection bolded) Fit to disk - Standard - High Quality
    Encoder: H.264
    Resolution:1080p
    Frame Rate: 23.976

    File Type: .MKV
    Frame Width: 1920
    Frame Height: 800
    Total Bitrate: 10199kbs
    Frame Rate: 23 FPS
    Video Tracks:
    H264 (High @L4.1)
    Last edited by RELiG; 20th Jun 2017 at 15:02.
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  2. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    All authored media formats (AudioCD, VideoCd, DVD-Video, DVD-Audio, SACD, HD-DVD, Blu-ray, Blu-ray3D...) should be burned as Disc-at-Once (or Session-at-Once for EnhancedCds), never with "formatting". Formatting as you are describing sets up the discs for multi-session packet writing, allowing you to use the disc as a sort of re-burnable backup hard drive.

    You need to get a better, compliant Blu-ray authoring software (e.g. DVDArchitect, BluStudio, or maybe multiAVCHD if on a shoestring budget), and then use a good burner software like ImgBurn.
    Look above at "What is Blu-ray?" for examples of what your discs' contents should look like.
    Certainly not MKV. Mkv, great container that is, is not used in any authored format, and authored formats are the kind of standardized playback that guarantee (near-universal) consumer compatibility with discs.

    Scott
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  3. Member
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    Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    All authored media formats (AudioCD, VideoCd, DVD-Video, DVD-Audio, SACD, HD-DVD, Blu-ray, Blu-ray3D...) should be burned as Disc-at-Once (or Session-at-Once for EnhancedCds), never with "formatting". Formatting as you are describing sets up the discs for multi-session packet writing, allowing you to use the disc as a sort of re-burnable backup hard drive.

    You need to get a better, compliant Blu-ray authoring software (e.g. DVDArchitect, BluStudio, or maybe multiAVCHD if on a shoestring budget), and then use a good burner software like ImgBurn.
    Look above at "What is Blu-ray?" for examples of what your discs' contents should look like.
    Certainly not MKV. Mkv, great container that is, is not used in any authored format, and authored formats are the kind of standardized playback that guarantee (near-universal) consumer compatibility with discs.

    Scott
    Thanks for the quick reply.

    So, in the example authoring softwares, what steps would I take?
    What does the authoring do exactly?

    Can the .MKV file be formatted into an appropriate file?
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    @RELiG The problem could be with the software Blu-ray authoring and burning software you used, or with the Blu-ray drive. USB 3.0 Blu-ray drives tend to be more problematic for burning than internal Blu-ray drives.

    Can your computer read the BD-R disc that you burned using the drive that created it? If yes, are you able to play the m2ts file (located in the BDMV folder's STREAM folder) containing the movie?

    Authoring software creates the files and folders needed for creating a Blu-ray disc. Converting audio and video for compatibility with the Blu-ray spec is often done separately with other software before authoring takes place.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 20th Jun 2017 at 16:50.
    Ignore list: hello_hello, tried
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  5. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    first you need to create blu-ray compliant video and audio streams. then import them into an authoring program to produce the disc structure needed to play as a "blu-ray" disc. a decent free blu-ray authoring program is blu-disc studio lite.
    --
    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
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    The video in the MKV file isn't Blu-ray compliant since the resolution is 1920x800 rather than 1920x1080. I think it will need to be re-encoded to use the free authoring software mentioned above. If I recall correctly, neither multiAVCHD nor Blu-Disc Studio Lite are able to re-encode video and audio to comply with the Blu-ray spec.
    Ignore list: hello_hello, tried
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    @Usually_quiet
    Can your computer read the BD-R disc that you burned using the drive that created it? If yes, are you able to play the mts file (located in the BDMV folder's STREAM folder) containing the movie?
    My laptop's internal drive doesn't have the capabilities to read BD of any type

    Im just unclear on the steps I need to take. Like, if I knew I was doing all the necessary steps in burning the BD, then I could focus my attention to a certain area for problem solving.

    - So, you have the original source file (Which is generally which format?)
    - Using appropriate software to covert audio and video
    - Then you use a authoring software to create the files and folders needed for the burn...?
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    Originally Posted by RELiG View Post
    @Usually_quiet
    Can your computer read the BD-R disc that you burned using the drive that created it? If yes, are you able to play the mts file (located in the BDMV folder's STREAM folder) containing the movie?
    My laptop's internal drive doesn't have the capabilities to read BD of any type
    I asked "Can your computer read the BD-R disc that you burned using the drive that created it?" ...meaning can the USB 3.0 Blu-ray drive read the files on the BD-R disc that you burned? Do you not have that USB 3.0 drive anymore?

    For what it is worth, if it turns out that the USB 3.0 drive you already have is incompatible with your laptop, it is often possible to replace internal DVD drives in laptops with an internal Blu-ray laptop drive.
    Ignore list: hello_hello, tried
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    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by RELiG View Post
    @Usually_quiet
    Can your computer read the BD-R disc that you burned using the drive that created it? If yes, are you able to play the mts file (located in the BDMV folder's STREAM folder) containing the movie?
    My laptop's internal drive doesn't have the capabilities to read BD of any type
    I asked "Can your computer read the BD-R disc that you burned using the drive that created it?" ...meaning can the USB 3.0 Blu-ray drive read the files on the BD-R disc that you burned? Do you not have that USB 3.0 drive anymore?

    For what it is worth, if it turns out that the USB 3.0 drive you already have is incompatible with your laptop, it is often possible to replace internal DVD drives in laptops with an internal Blu-ray laptop drive.
    Oh my bad, mis-read it. Theres no video, but when I double click the drive theres 2 folders on the disk. BDMV folder and a BACKUP folder.

    Im fairly positive the USB 3.0 drive is functioning properly
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    Originally Posted by RELiG View Post
    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by RELiG View Post
    @Usually_quiet
    Can your computer read the BD-R disc that you burned using the drive that created it? If yes, are you able to play the mts file (located in the BDMV folder's STREAM folder) containing the movie?
    My laptop's internal drive doesn't have the capabilities to read BD of any type
    I asked "Can your computer read the BD-R disc that you burned using the drive that created it?" ...meaning can the USB 3.0 Blu-ray drive read the files on the BD-R disc that you burned? Do you not have that USB 3.0 drive anymore?

    For what it is worth, if it turns out that the USB 3.0 drive you already have is incompatible with your laptop, it is often possible to replace internal DVD drives in laptops with an internal Blu-ray laptop drive.
    Oh my bad, mis-read it. Theres no video, but when I double click the drive theres 2 folders on the disk. BDMV folder and a BACKUP folder.

    Im fairly positive the USB 3.0 drive is functioning properly
    There should be a .m2ts file containing the movie located in the BDMV folder's STREAM folder. If there is more than one, it will be the largest .m2ts file in the STREAM folder. If there is no such video file in the BDMV folder's STREAM folder, then Wondershare is worse than I expected. If you can find the m2ts file, then play it to find out if the quality is satisfactory.

    A MediaInfo report for that .m2ts file should reveal whether or not it is Blu-Ray compliant. After downloading the the portable version of MediaInfo from VideoHelp's software section, Open MediaInfo. Drag the the .m2ts file to MediaInfo, and then click "View" on the menu bar followed by "Text" on the drop-down menu. Cut and paste the report into a post.

    If the m2ts file is compliant, and you are satisfied with it's quality, then you can use the m2ts file with other software for authoring and burning.
    Ignore list: hello_hello, tried
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