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  1. Member
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    I like to rip short clips from standard movie DVDs that are of the highest possible quality. I donít care about file size or the time it takes the software to make the clip. I only care about avoiding the slight increase in pixilation (over the DVD) that some motion scenes have. I have been using DVDFab ver 10 to make clips using the MP4 H264 selection. Then I edit the file with MovieMaker to get the clip I want. I have tried H265 and the quality seems the same or very slightly inferior to H264. Both H264 and H265 produce slightly inferior quality to the original DVD, at least for the scenes with motion that I have compared to the original. I would like to know if there is a better way.
    Last edited by quietstorm1; 17th Jun 2017 at 15:52.
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  2. Originally Posted by quietstorm1 View Post
    I like to rip short clips from standard movie DVDs that are of the highest possible quality. I donít care about file size or the time it takes the software to make the clip. I only care about avoiding the slight increase in pixilation (over the DVD) that some motion scenes have. I have been using DVDFab ver 10 to make clips using the MP4 H264 selection. I have tried H265 and the quality seems the same or very slightly inferior to H264. Both H264 and H265 produce slightly inferior quality to the original DVD, at least for the scenes with motion that I have compared to the original. I would like to know if there is a better way.
    Why don't you rip the original MPEG2 clip ? That's the original quality. That's what "rip" actually means . You're re-encoding it .

    If you don't care about the filesize you can use higher bitrate, even lossless. But it will be several times larger than the original. Might as well keep the original

    If the source had problems to begin with, another option is to filter it, you can increase subjective quality that way
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  3. Originally Posted by poisondeathray View Post
    You're re-encoding it .
    Twice.

    One way to extract the untouched video from the VOB files (already decrypted to the hard drive) is to open a VOB in MPEG2Cut2 and isolate the section you want followed by saving it to MPG.

    MovieMaker is also reencoding so once you have the original source cut from the DVD, you can then determine if MovieMaker is the source of the problem. Then, as pdr suggested, use a higher bitrate. There's also a very good chance a part extracted (from a film?) should be 23.976fps and you're getting it at 29.97fps. That would account for the 'pixelation' during motion scenes (probably really interlacing) you're noticing. The answer is to extract it at 23.976fps or IVTC it back to 23.976fps. Which to do and how to do that depends on how it was encoded. You might make a 10 second untouched piece available for someone to study.
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    In case its relevant I'll mention all my DVDs are actually ISO files. I'll also mention I did a quick search on MPEG2 after I read the first reply and I would like to ask where that format would enter the discussion?

    I just discovered I can make "MKV Passthrough files" with DVDFab and make edit the file in DVDFab thus cutting out MovieMaker. The MKV seems to play easily.

    Do you think making MKV files is a good choice? Is there a better file format or a better method?
    Last edited by quietstorm1; 17th Jun 2017 at 17:13.
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  5. Originally Posted by quietstorm1 View Post
    In case its relevant I'll mention all my DVDs are actually ISO files. I'll also mention I did a quick search on MPEG2 after I read the first reply and I would like to ask where that format would enter the discussion?
    All video data on DVDs is MPEG 2. Extracting that MPEG 2 data and muxing into the container of your choice (VOB, MPG, MKV...) gives you an exact copy of what's on the disc (ISO file).
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  6. He edited it out, but earlier he said he needed MP4 compatible with common players or something to that effect. Is that still true ? Did you mean portable devices like phones, etc... or "software" players ?

    MKV passthrough would be MPEG2 in MKV container and original quality (essentially a stream copy), but it won't be compatible with devices like iphone etc.. without hacks or 3rd party players. AVC in MP4 would be the most compatible format for modern devices

    All the processing issues manono referred to are still relevant . DVD is an interlaced format. Film content (like Hollywood DVD's) would need to be IVTC'ed most likely, and things like sports DVD's or home video DVD's would need to be deinterlaced for full compatibility (modern devices are expecting progressive content)

    For encoding quality, using higher bitrate usually fixes all issues for all encoders. This means larger file size. But there are more efficient/better encoders and some that are worse. x264 is generally regarded as the top AVC encoder . There are specific settings you can use that can redistribute to higher action/motion scenes as well. For example you can increase qcomp
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  7. MPEG 2 video and AC3 audio can be muxed into an MP4 container. I don't know what players can deal with it. I suspect the AC3 audio would be the biggest problem since Apple refused to support it for such a long time.
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