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    Do you know if there is any DVD/Blu-ray authoring software (menu & navigation buttons included) that will write a first generation DTS Audio soundtrack to disk?

    example - https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/SurCodeDVDDTS

    I have an uncompressed 323 MB 5.1 audio mix file coming from Sound Forge Pro 11 that compresses to a 12 MB File when using the old outdated AC3 encoder. I have all my settings maxed out in Magix's DVD Architect Pro 6.0 before burning to a Blu-ray disk. Of course the uncompressed file is far superior to the AC3 file when played back.
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  2. Member DB83's Avatar
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    Is it just me but I have a strong smell of spam here.

    Why otherwise would there be a link to software that the OP claims he has not used to make his audio file ?

    More than that. DVD Architect Pro is not a Magix product. Or is it ?
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    Originally Posted by DB83 View Post
    More than that. DVD Architect Pro is not a Magix product. Or is it ?
    Magix bought DVD Architect along with Sony's Vegas product line.
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    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by DB83 View Post
    More than that. DVD Architect Pro is not a Magix product. Or is it ?
    Magix bought DVD Architect along with Sony's Vegas product line.
    Thanks for that. I always regarded Magix to be 2nd or even 3rd division when it came to sw. Almost a case if you can not beat them then buy them out
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    Originally Posted by DB83 View Post
    Thanks for that. I always regarded Magix to be 2nd or even 3rd division when it came to sw. Almost a case if you can not beat them then buy them out
    Not exactly. Sony had already announced they were discontinuing development on these products, and apparently put them up for sale. Magix is supposedly keeping the US-based software development team as well, so maybe this is a win-win for everyone concerned.

    Code:
    http://www.sonycreativesoftware.com/news/pressreleases/2016/sony-creative-software-sell-products-to-magix
    [Edit]I linked to a press release at the Sony Creative Software website which Google found for me, but clicking on the link re-directs to Magix. Cutting and pasting the link text into a browser worked, so I removed the link.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 1st Feb 2017 at 12:27.
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    DB83, not spam my friend. The link was an example of an audio encoder that is far superior to the old outdated AC3 encoder that is reasonably priced. The real goal here is to create a decent music A/V production. So you want the best possible software to accomplish this for your clients. Sony Blue Print will burn any audio encoder for 5.1, 7.1 9.1 soundtracks along with 3D & HD video but it is cost prohibitive for small A/V studios. Adobe Premiere (bundled with Encore), Sony Vegas (bundled with DVD Architect), Edius Pro 8 all accept AC3 5.1 audio files which are severely compressed. A lot of these Audio encoders have not been used in years by the big boys (DTS first generation, Dolby Pro Logic, Dolby EX ect.) I am hoping a software company like the ones I mentioned will incorporate a better audio encoder (even uncompressed surround audio files) to be available when burring to a Blu-ray disc. So again if you know of any A/V software that will burn a better 5.1 audio soundtrack other than an AC3 please let me know. Love the pic!
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    I am no audiophile and my knowledge od audio can be written on the back of a postage stamp with enough room left for atleast one volume of Britannica.

    If you are surprised at the lack of response, any spam issues aside (JMOHO), then you need to look no further than the BD spec - top of this page 'What is'

    But surely D(TS) = Dolby(Theater System) = AC3 = compressed. Or am I having yet another senior moment ?

    The bottom line being if your audio file was compliant then no authoring program would find it necessary to re-encode.
    Last edited by DB83; 2nd Feb 2017 at 14:06.
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    Burning (writing to disc) is not the same as authoring. Some authoring software creates files and folders but does not burn them. If that is the case and a BD ISO or a burnd BD disc is needed, there is always ImgBurn. Editing and encoding is also done separately from authoring in many cases.

    Somebody mentioned EasyBD Lite in another DTS Blu-ray authoring thread several years ago, but the member who wrote about it noted that the Lite version of this software is limited with respect to menus and other features. The Lite version is free. Paid versions of EasyBD start at 799 Euros.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 2nd Feb 2017 at 14:18.
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    see below
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    When I am authoring a DVD or Blu-ray it is usually a concert or video I filmed and recorded. As to your statement of there is a difference between burning and authoring, all authoring software (as matter of fact all software) for Data or Media, ISO's, Imagine Disc etc. has a button to click on that says burn to disc. Very elementary I know but maybe that will help you understand why I used the term burn.
    I am just searching for authoring software that sells for a reasonable cost that lets you burn, oh sorry, I mean author, a 5.1 surround sound file to a better audio encoder. Just not the severely compressed AC3 audio encoder to a Blu-ray disc.
    Vegas (DVD Architect Pro), Premiere (Encore) Edius 8 Pro will not accept any other encoded audio files except the old outdated 5.1 AC3 surround file. The big boys are using DTS Master HD and Dolby Atmos for encoding surround audio files today. Of course to buy a license for those encoders are cost prohibitive for small A/V studios. There plenty of first and second generation audio encoders that are far superior to the 5.1 AC3 encoder. (First Generation DTS, Dolby Pro Logic, Dolby EX etc.) I would like to see one of those great authoring programs that I mentioned update their audio encoders or even accept plug-in audio encoders. Nobody is authoring DVD/Blu-rays with the above listed audio encoders anymore. So why not incorporate them as an update into an authoring software program. Hey even the big boys can make some money off the license.
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    Originally Posted by gillman View Post
    When I am authoring a DVD or Blu-ray it is usually a concert or video I filmed and recorded. As to your statement of there is a difference between burning and authoring, all authoring software (as matter of fact all software) for Data or Media, ISO's, Imagine Disc etc. has a button to click on that says burn to disc. Very elementary I know but maybe that will help you understand why I used the term burn.
    I am just searching for authoring software that sells for a reasonable cost that lets you burn, oh sorry, I mean author, a 5.1 surround sound file to a better audio encoder. Just not the severely compressed AC3 audio encoder to a Blu-ray disc.
    Vegas (DVD Architect Pro), Premiere (Encore) Edius 8 Pro will not accept any other encoded audio files except the old outdated 5.1 AC3 surround file. The big boys are using DTS Master HD and Dolby Atmos for encoding surround audio files today. Of course to buy a license for those encoders are cost prohibitive for small A/V studios. There plenty of first and second generation audio encoders that are far superior to the 5.1 AC3 encoder. (First Generation DTS, Dolby Pro Logic, Dolby EX etc.) I would like to see one of those great authoring programs that I mentioned update their audio encoders or even accept plug-in audio encoders. Nobody is authoring DVD/Blu-rays with the above listed audio encoders anymore. So why not incorporate them as an update into an authoring software program. Hey even the big boys can make some money off the license.
    When I read the above, I laughed so hard that I nearly fell off my chair.

    Write to the companies that make the prosumer software you use and ask them why they don't do what you want. Maybe you will get an answer and maybe you won't, but even if complaining here makes you feel better, it won't solve your problem.
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    I hope you did not hurt yourself laughing. I am glad I made someone that calls them self usually quiet respond to this kind of thread. I have been working with multi- track hard drive recording since the late 80's. At the time I could only record up to 8 audio tracks. I started getting involved in software forum discussions just like this one. When I ask if we could produce faster processing chips along with faster hard drives (I have solid state hard drives now for advances in video editing also) to have unlimited audio tracks synced up to video for a reasonable cost. And wouldnít you know it; I was chastised then just like you are doing now. Why anyone in the A/V business that would not want improvements or ask for better software and equipment is beyond me. So go ahead and have a good laugh. I will check back with you usually quiet in 10 years and we will see who will be laughing then. Have nice day Sir.
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    The software exists but one has to be prepared to pay for it.

    Software companies who licence pro-level tools have to recover their r+d and putting these tools under licence in pro-consumer products makes these products less attractive to the masses. Can you honestly expect such a tool in a sub $100 product ?

    Even when you step up to pro-level authoring, these tools are generally not there because with pro tools all assets are produced outside the authoring and merely imported.

    When I first started out in dvd authoring I was using Ulead DVD Workshop. Version 1 did not support ac3 but could be included as a separate add-in at additional cost. Thus making the basic product more attractive(it was still a comparatively expensive piece of software) . Only in version 2 was ac3 fully supported (with an appropriate hike in the price)

    As u_q stated, by all means contact Magix for feedback of inclusion of such support. But software companies rely on volume sales. Add even a few bucks and consumers look elsewhere since they are not interested in such niche capabilities.
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    Originally Posted by DB83 View Post
    The software exists but one has to be prepared to pay for it.
    Exactly.

    Originally Posted by DB83 View Post
    Even when you step up to pro-level authoring, these tools are generally not there because with pro tools all assets are produced outside the authoring and merely imported.
    I remember reading this not long after I joined here nearly eleven years ago, and it is still true much of the time.

    DVDLogic's EasyBD product line apparently accepts compliant DTS, DTS-HD and DTS-HD MA audio streams for authoring. http://www.dvd-logic.com/easybd/features.html ...but I don't think it is able to encode audio to use any of these formats.
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    EasyBD (or any of these free or cheap software packages) will not accept any 5.1 encoded surround sound files created by the user. It may copy prerecorded DVDs or Blu-rays but not the files I am talking about unless it is an AC3 5.1 File.
    Did you guys remember when people were begging to use the Dolby AC3 5.1 encoder for their projects when it first came out? Well guess what it happened. I donít expect a program to only cost a $100 with some of the projects I do but I canít afford a like Sonyís Blue Print which is the only one I know of that does what I want. I gave you guys an example at the top of this thread of a DTS encoder that is reasonably priced but I am having trouble finding a software program that will burn or author it to a disk. I have several 5.1 Sony 64 bit Multichannel Wave files that I can only playback thru my 5.1 surround sound mixing set-up. Some of these projects have up to 32 tracks and I am exporting out to a 6 channel wave file. I am currently mixing a concert (recorded with a on-site 16 track digital recorder) in 5.1. I have already mixed it stereo and burned or authored it to Blu-ray. But I would like to have the 5.1 soundtrack authored or burned to a Blu-ray. As an example; one track I just finished was 323MB in a Sony 64 bit wave file. When I export the file to a AC3 encoder it compresses to a 12MB file.

    I have gotten a lot tips on from these forums. Some people respond with an open and intelligent mind and some can be very immature. These forum discussions are great way to learn and I am always ready to expand and enhance my craft. Thank you for responding.
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    This will be last post in this topic since I get the feeling that my replies are being considered 'immature'

    1. The software you linked to in your OP makes no claim to making audio files for BD. It only states 'DVD'
    2. Are you sure that the 64 bit file from soundforge is also BD compliant ?

    In fact the only audio software I can find that will encode DTS-HD audio for BD itself costs > $1000

    That being said, these products are aimed at fully pro authoring. And that does come at a price.

    I have never used dvd architect. But the software I have used will not re-encode if the source material is compliant - one would have to locate the option within the software to set that.

    So, clearly, the first step is to ensure that the source really is compliant. You may think it is but maybe it is not. I would atleast suggest that you post a mediainfo (text mode) report of that 300 meg file.

    I would also suggest that the revise your topic heading to reflect this concern.
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    I did not name anybody in this thread as being immature. I am sorry if you took it that way. I am using the term immature in general for describing some of the responses from people who participate in these different types of forum discussions. As matter of fact your responses has been respectful and I appreciate that.

    Blu-ray dics are backwards compatible when writing stereo audio (MP3s, 16, 24, 32, 64 bit wave files). You can convert a SD video to HD video before burning to a Blu-ray
    The file will dither down when converting and the picture will actually look better when played back.

    I talked to the seller of the DTS encoder who stated it will burn to a Blu-ray with the right arthoring software. He did not know of any software except Sony's Blue Print* that would write different encoders except AC3 file (he also stated AC3 5.1 files are the MP3s of 5.1 soundtracks) to a BD and playback in any BD player.

    To your question: [I]Are you sure that the 64 bit file from Soundforge is also BD compliant ? No, not when it is uncompressed (at this time - no software available except*). It will be compliant when compressed to a AC3 for playback in any Blu-ray player. You just can't drag the file to a BD and expect to play in any BD player. It will only be recognized as data.
    Keep in mind these are all real time recordings I am using not pre-recorded audio.

    May I ask you a respectful question? Do you have the equipment to record in real time to a multi-track DAW (Digital Audio Station on-site or a studio)) then mix the audio tracks into a PCM Stereo Wave File or a 5.1 Surround Sound Wave File? The last step would be to present the production with the HD video and soundtrack to your clients that can be played back on any BD player?

    Again, I apologize if you thought I was talking about you personally.
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    I'll give you a respectful answer. No. But that is irrelevant to this topic. Neither do I author BD's. Whilst I am aware that Blu-ray is backward compatable to dvd, not all audio formats are compliant for dvd.

    That software guy might only know Blue Print since he is apparently producing a pro-level tool. But, respectfully once again, I still think you are confused about authoring. If a dvd authoring package can accept a compliant file - I do not expect any program to accept a non-compliant file and pass that through without re-encoding - then surely a decent Blu-ray authoring program can do likewise and without pawning off the family silver to raise the cash for the purchase.

    So the workflow is always >> Non-compliant > Compliant (outside the authoring program) > authoring program > burn.

    You appear to be discounting the suggested software. But have you actually tried it out ?. Of course it is possible that the free versions do not have such support but you can always ask the creators just as you did with that DTS encoder.
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    Thank you for your honest answer and for all your input is was greatly appreciated.
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    Originally Posted by gillman View Post
    EasyBD (or any of these free or cheap software packages) will not accept any 5.1 encoded surround sound files created by the user. It may copy prerecorded DVDs or Blu-rays but not the files I am talking about unless it is an AC3 5.1 File.
    Did you guys remember when people were begging to use the Dolby AC3 5.1 encoder for their projects when it first came out? Well guess what it happened. I donít expect a program to only cost a $100 with some of the projects I do but I canít afford a like Sonyís Blue Print which is the only one I know of that does what I want. I gave you guys an example at the top of this thread of a DTS encoder that is reasonably priced but I am having trouble finding a software program that will burn or author it to a disk. I have several 5.1 Sony 64 bit Multichannel Wave files that I can only playback thru my 5.1 surround sound mixing set-up. Some of these projects have up to 32 tracks and I am exporting out to a 6 channel wave file. I am currently mixing a concert (recorded with a on-site 16 track digital recorder) in 5.1. I have already mixed it stereo and burned or authored it to Blu-ray. But I would like to have the 5.1 soundtrack authored or burned to a Blu-ray. As an example; one track I just finished was 323MB in a Sony 64 bit wave file. When I export the file to a AC3 encoder it compresses to a 12MB file.

    I have gotten a lot tips on from these forums. Some people respond with an open and intelligent mind and some can be very immature. These forum discussions are great way to learn and I am always ready to expand and enhance my craft. Thank you for responding.
    Well, I tried EasyBD Lite this morning. I was able to verify that it accepts and authors DTS audio if it is compliant.

    I ripped a Blu-ray that I own using DVDFab Passkey to be sure the files I had were Blu-ray compliant. I demultiplexed the resulting mts into an elementary H.264 video stream and several audio streams including a 5.1 channel DTS MA. I imported the H.264 stream and the 5.1 channel DTS MA into EasyBD Lite. Both files were accepted. I used EasyBD Lite to make a menuless BD for a quick and dirty test. Unfortunately, there was not quite enough disc space to complete the process, but the program got far enough to multiplex the H.264 stream and the 5.1 channel DTS-MA into a new mts.

    DTS audio files would need to be pre-encoded with other software for EasyBD Lite. EasyBD Lite does not encode (although it verifies compliance) and probably does not burn files to disc. If someone wants Blu-ray compliant DTS or DTS MA audio files for Blu-ray authoring, they most likely need to be prepared to buy a $1500 encoder from DTS to use an authoring program that costs less than several thousand dollars.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 3rd Feb 2017 at 13:45.
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    Thank you for taking the time to do that. I appreciate your input.
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    Originally Posted by gillman View Post
    Thank you for taking the time to do that. I appreciate your input.
    You are welcome.

    I managed to clear enough space on my hard drive to finish authoring a menuless Blu-ray with EasyBD Lite. I don't have any BD-R DL or BD-RE DL discs to actually burn the output from EasyBD Lite to disc with ImgBurn, so I used ImgBurn to create a Blu-ray ISO instead. After I mounted the ISO with DVDFab Virtual Drive, PowerDVD Ultra recognized it as a Blu-ray and played it -- just the movie of course because there is no menu. It looks like simple menus may be possible but I didn't want to take the time to figure out how to create one.

    I don't have much use for a Blu-ray authoring program, but this would be sufficient proof of concept for me to investigate EasyBD Lite a bit further if I did need one in the future.

    [Edit] One thing I forgot... The DTS file included 8 channel as well as 6 channel audio.

    After looking at the manual a bit more, it appears EasyBD Lite does not provide a way to create menus from which someone can select a video to watch when playing the disc.
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    Great thank you. Do you have anyway to record six audio tracks in real time encode it other than a AC3 encoder which are free to download. I would be curious to see if the blu-ray would burn correctly using the software you have with the encoded audio tracks and maybe a still photo on the timeline with same running time as the audio tracks. Please use recorded real time audio not pre-recorded. Let me know if you can do this. It would help me greatly.
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    With respect, you appear to have missed the point.

    u_q has confirmed that the software will accept a compliant DTS source. It makes no difference if the audio is recorded in real time or pre-recorded since it is your responsibility to convert the real time audio in to a compliant source. Didn't that sw you linked to claim to do that ?

    Once you have a compliant source then there may be even other authoring programs you can use. I would guess that the paid-for versions of EasyBD will have menu-creation facilities but you will have to explore that.
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    Originally Posted by gillman View Post
    Great thank you. Do you have anyway to record six audio tracks in real time encode it other than a AC3 encoder which are free to download. I would be curious to see if the blu-ray would burn correctly using the software you have with the encoded audio tracks and maybe a still photo on the timeline with same running time as the audio tracks. Please use recorded real time audio not pre-recorded. Let me know if you can do this. It would help me greatly.
    No. ...and how the audio was obtained should have no bearing whatsoever on authoring it. The audio just has to be encoded to meet the Blu-ray spec in order to author it, assuming one has authoring software that accepts any type of audio that complies with the Blu-ray spec.

    The types of Blu-ray compliant audio that you want to use are patent encumbered. Encoders for them are fairly expensive to licence, and nobody has reverse engineered freeware encoders. It should be apparent by now that you can either pay the price asked to get what you want or forget about using that type of audio on any Blu-ray disc that you create.

    How many thousands of dollars have you spent on equipment for your job, either purchases or rentals in order to obtain professional results? What makes you think that you can scrimp on software (use something like DVD Architect) and still obtain Hollywood-quality audio on Blu-ray? If you insist on an all-in-one editing, encoding, and authoring solution that can encode higher quality audio than AC3, that limits you to the most expensive software.
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    I have explained my position and what I need several times and I am tried of typing. Good luck to both you and have a blessed life. Peace & Love!
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    I was wrong about there being no freeware DTS encoder. There is one, ffdcaenc, although it won't be of any use to gillman.

    DTS is patent-protected in the USA, so ffdcaenc isn't legal software here. ffdcaenc is also a command line program, and apparently without a decent GUI, so anyone who wants to use it should be comfortable with writing scripts. I have no idea if its output is flawlessly encoded DTS suitable for Blu-ray or not.
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    Originally Posted by gillman View Post
    I have explained my position and what I need several times and I am tried of typing. Good luck to both you and have a blessed life. Peace & Love!
    Explained what ?

    Right back in your OP you stated you had created a 64 bit file from 6 files unless I misread you. Your only mantra now is that audio must be live recorded. Guess what. Once you have live recorded it becomes 'pre-recorded' since audio is only 'live' at the point of playing/recording.

    Now if I read you wrong and you do not have 6 audio files but just one from the live recording then surely soundforge can extract the streams and give you the 6 files you need to create the DTS file and then use that software to create it. Again I thought I previously read that you have already done that.

    Maybe some expensive state of the art encoding software can create a DTS direct from this 'live' recording using your equipment which very few, if any, on here would own. Here we are simply concerned with getting a BD authoring program to accept a compliant DTS stream.
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    @DB83 - The Minnetonka Audio DTS encoder in the intitial post is labeled for DVD and CD. Minnetonka has a different product for Blu-Ray which is priced similarly, but it is a plug-in to use with Final Cut Pro and Compressor. There is no similar product produced for Windows.

    At least one consumer editor offers DTS encoding, Powerdirector Ultra 15 plus Power Director Ultimate, etc. ...but its Blu-ray authoring feature is limited (although it does burn ), so authoring might be best done with other software. I don't know if the timeline requires importing individual mono WAV tracks for mutichannel audio. However gillman is not open to using different programs for editing and authoring and is possibly unwilling to download trial software and experiment with it.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 4th Feb 2017 at 13:39. Reason: spelling, clarity
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