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  1. Member
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    Jan 2009
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    I have a Samsung DVD player hooked up to my Vizio Smart TV. I've been watching Warner Archive DVDs of old Hanna Barbara cartoons. I'm watching them through the red/white/yellow cables because I think SD stuff looks better that way, but I've been noticing some frame blending. It's probably because these are cheaply - made manufacturer-on-demand titles with low bitrates that were pressed onto cheap DVD-Rs, but I was just wondering if changing the TV Aspect setting on the Samsung DVD player would make a difference - right now it's set to "wide", but the TV itself is set to put black bars on the side of the screen and squash it into 4:3 (which is the way that I prefer to watch old TV shows) - would changing the TV aspect setting on the DVD player to 4:3 Letterbox or 4:3 pan&scan make the frame blending less noticeable, or should I just leave it the way it is because it's something I can live with it I have too?
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  2. Member
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    Aug 2010
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    Is there some reason you cannot try it and find out?
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  3. Member
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    I did try, but it seems to be one of those situations where your mind can't really decide whether or not it notices any difference so I decided it would be better to ask people who probably know more about this kind of thing than I do
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  4. Originally Posted by DaneClark View Post
    ...would changing the TV aspect setting on the DVD player to 4:3 Letterbox or 4:3 pan&scan make the frame blending less noticeable...
    No, the DVD player setting is for your television set. If you have a widescreen TV you set it for 16:9 and don't change it.
    It's probably because these are cheaply - made manufacturer-on-demand titles with low bitrates that were pressed onto cheap DVD-Rs
    None of that has anything to do with it. It has to do with how the sources were converted to NTSC DVD.
    ...or should I just leave it the way it is because it's something I can live with it I have too?
    Me, I'd reencode them to get rid of the blending, although we'd have to see a sample to be sure it can be done and how it should be done.
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  5. Member
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    [QUOTE=manono;2473157]
    Originally Posted by DaneClark View Post
    ...would changing the TV aspect setting on the DVD player to 4:3 Letterbox or 4:3 pan&scan make the frame blending less noticeable...
    No, the DVD player setting is for your television set. If you have a widescreen TV you set it for 16:9 and don't change it.
    [QUOTE]
    Even when my 16:9 is set to a setting that puts black bars on the sides of the screen and squished the picture to simulate 4:3?
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  6. Originally Posted by DaneClark View Post
    Even when my 16:9 is set to a setting that puts black bars on the sides of the screen and squished the picture to simulate 4:3?
    My original answer was for how to set up the DVD player. You can then have the television make all kinds of aspect ratio changes using the remote control. It varies by the television, but for mine I set the TV for 'original'. 4:3 material gets played with black bars on the sides. 16:9 DVDs fill the screen from side to side (except for 1.66:1 ratio films) and may or may not have blacks bars above and below, depending on the original aspect ratio. I never have to mess with the aspect ratio settings (unless watching standard def television channels) although I realize other brands might do it differently.
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