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  1. I have very successfully transferred 35 home video tapes to my pc using this method. BTW Black Magic Tech was 100% Useless.

    1. I set the card in the control panel to NTSC (NOT Progressive or you'll get dropped frames)

    2. I set the capture in Media Express to NTSC and only use AVI 8-bit YUV

    3. Capture only to a very fast hdd that can keep up as it's uncompressed video!! 1 1/2 hours is 109 GB......

    4. Then I import the video into Adobe Encoder 64-bit and set it to export as a 640x480 You Tube SD Video and the video is great!! Automatically De-Interlaced and looks great on a tv.

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  2. Hi

    I guess you have captured VHS tapes. Which deck model have you used?

    Did you use some TBC in between or any other pass-through device? I wanted to do that but I discarded Intensity Pro as the seller told me that it needed a good signal level.

    I guess you captured to 1080p. Did you? If so, I wonder how you did manage to decomb/deinterlace it...NTSC VHS is 480 lines of vertical resolution, wouldn't it mess up the fields to capture 480 interlaced/combed lines to 1080p ?
    Last edited by darkbluesky; 25th Dec 2016 at 08:26.
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  3. Member
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    Originally Posted by darkbluesky View Post
    I guess you captured to 1080p. Did you? If so, I wonder how you did manage to decomb/deinterlace it...NTSC VHS is 480 lines of vertical resolution, wouldn't it mess up the fields to capture 480 interlaced/combed lines to 1080p ?
    There is nothing in kris-chevyz24's post about capturing 1080p. He wrote that he captured NTSC (720x480 interlaced) 8-bit YUV as uncompressed video. kris-chevyz24 reported that 1 1/2 hours used 109 GB, but that is because uncompressed NTSC video uses about 70 GB/h. Even losslessly compressed NTSC video requires 25-30 GB per hour, depending on the encoder. Lossy encoders are needed for smaller file sizes.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 25th Dec 2016 at 13:11.
    Ignore list: hello_hello, tried, TechLord
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