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  1. Hello! New to the forum!

    I've found similar questions answered on Google already, but not this one. If I take a Blu Ray iso and somehow burn it sector-for-sector to a DVD disc (assuming the content has been re-authored to be less than four gigabytes), will sticking it in a Blu Ray player have it work correctly as a Blu Ray? Or will it just totally confuse the player? (Or is the model of player important?)

    Thank you!
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  2. Mod Neophyte Super Moderator redwudz's Avatar
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    Maybe. I've never tried it. Look here and see if this covers it:
    http://club.myce.com/f61/bd2dvd-blu-ray-dvd-guide-232165/

    It looks like they are splitting a regular BD to several DVD discs.
    But since DVD blanks are cheap enough you could try it.

    It could be useful if you have a short HD file that will fit on a DVD disc.

    Others here may have a better method.

    And welcome to our forums.
    Last edited by redwudz; 24th Nov 2016 at 22:54.
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  3. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Should work. But much depends on the parsing logic for those players: when it recognizes the media type, does that predispose it to expecting only one kind of application format? Or does it just blindly look for any recognizable starter flags?

    Scott
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  5. Explorer Case's Avatar
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    Blu-ray players don't have to support it for certification, but many do support it anyway, very similar to AVCHD support. Keep the bitrate modest though, as the bandwidth will be throttled by the media.
    Roxio software (Toast for Mac) has a separate option for it, confusingly named “High Definition DVD” (as it is different from HDDVD), which defaults to AVC 8 Mbps average, 16 Mbps max. They suggest it should hold about 30 mins. of HD video per DVD layer.
    The reverse (VIDEO_TS on BD) might confuse many more players. Better author the proper way.
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  6. I decided to just wing it, seeing as to how it's pretty clear that the player in question matters.

    Bit-rates/data-transfer-rates shouldn't be a huge issue in my case. I'm backing up my media collection for preservation (not distribution), and I wanted to keep the menus and all that, so I downscaled the non-menu m2ts files to 720x404. Shrank the file sizes from ~5.5gb to 200-400mb! Used all sorts of command line options to ensure that it meets the Blu-Ray standard and that the tracks are very similar to the originals (Menu IDs, track IDs, etc). Now I just gotta fix up the Blu-Ray structures manually. Thanks a ton!

    EDIT: It works! I needed to go through a LOT of trial and error to get it down to a science, though.

    Things to note, for any interested:

    -The time-stamps, time-codes, and video lengths (not file-sizes) have to be exactly the same as the original m2ts files. FFMPEG allows for this - TsMuxer does not!

    -Due to the above, it seems trimming isn't a good way to do things if you want to preserve the Blu-Ray structures - it seems recompression (or downscaling) is a better way to go for this.

    -The file sizes will mismatch after a re-encode/remux, so the Blu-Ray structure's "clip information" must be updated. Fortunately, BDedit will do this for you. You have to scroll though the clip list and keep clicking "yes", once for each altered clip.

    -The menu m2ts files can be altered, but it seems to cause menu lag on VLC and XBMC (untested on real player hardware) - just process the main feature and leave the menus untouched.

    -Two things to note are that the maximum number of Blu-Ray H264 ref-frames is 5 (I made the initial mistake of making it 6), and the Blu-Ray standard is picky about video resolutions/dimensions - pad your video files if unsure!
    Last edited by DumdogsWorld; 25th Nov 2016 at 17:47. Reason: To show that the burning and playback attempt worked.
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