VideoHelp Forum

Try DVDFab and copy Ultra HD Blu-rays and DVDs! Or rip iTunes movies and music! Download free trial !
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 5 of 5
Thread
  1. Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Search PM
    Hi there, first post and I'm mostly clueless to VCR and video, but I've been converting over some videos I had on VHS-C to DVD through a DVD recorder I've borrowed from my Father In Law. The earliest copies I made were fine, sound and video were near identical (for better or worse) to the tape copy. I'd put the project down for a year and started it back this morning (or tried to).

    Every VHS-C tape I use in the DVD Recorder setup has a really high pitched annoying tone or noise that's running constant through the entire tape. So I'm trying to trouble shoot this and find a solution.


    Some other info
    The same VHS-C tapes and adaptor when played through a different VCR does NOT have the same audio problem/beeping/noise.

    Regular commercial VHS tapes played through the DVD recorder do NOT have the same audio problem.

    I tried transferring anyway, but the noise did carry over to the DVD copy.

    I am running those tapes from the alternate VCR into the input of the DVD recorder which is working fine, though it has more steps, but mostly I don't want to give the recorder back to my FIL with the audio issues w/ VHS-C tapes.
    Quote Quote  
  2. Originally Posted by undyingfire View Post
    Every VHS-C tape I use in the DVD Recorder setup has a really high pitched annoying tone or noise that's running constant through the entire tape. So I'm trying to trouble shoot this and find a solution. ... The same VHS-C tapes and adaptor when played through a different VCR does NOT have the same audio problem/beeping/noise.
    I am quite familiar with this problem. I have a JVC VCR that does this.

    Here's what I've learned. See if this describes your situation.

    1. The problem only happens with tapes recorded using slow LP speed (i.e., the "6-hour" mode).
    2. The problem only happens with tapes that only have a linear audio track (i.e., NOT the "Hi-Fi" track only found in some post-1990 higher-end camcorders).

    This explains why the commercial tapes play fine: most of them are recorded in the SP ("2-hour") speed, and most post-1990 commercial tapes included a Hi-Fi audio track.

    What you are hearing, I think, is part of the control track bleeding through into the linear audio.

    Unfortunately, I know of no simple solution.

    Possible solutions (that I've used) include:

    1. Transferring using a different deck. This will be a pain for you because you'll then have to figure out how to capture that video and transfer to a DVD. These two steps are handled automatically for you when you use your DVD recorder.

    2. Transfer, but then fix the audio using Audacity, iZotope or some other sound program that has a notch filter that can remove the tone.

    This second one isn't a great option for you either because you won't be able to simply record to the DVD, which is what makes those DVD recorder units, like the one you are using, so great for getting through a big transfer project. Also, something else you may find, which may not be readily apparent to you now, is that in addition to the high frequency tone, you may find that the audio level is really, really low. I'm pretty sure the problem is caused by a slight misalignment that causes the control track, which is adjacent to the linear audio track, to bleed through. This same misalignment also causes the audio to become quieter and more muffled (i.e., less high-frequency content).

    The final alternative is the only one that will really do the job for you, and that is to get the unit realigned. Since it did work at one point in time, a good service person can probably fix it. However, I have no idea whether there is anyone left on this planet that still does this work. For someone who knows which thing to tweak, it is probably only about five minutes of work (do not try it yourself because it requires equipment and skills that you probably don't have).

    I'm sorry I can't come up with a better solution, but I'm pretty sure I've given you the correct information about what is causing your problem.
    Quote Quote  
  3. Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    San Francisco, California
    Search PM
    Control and linear audio tracks are at opposite edges of the VHS tape with helical video in between. It's very doubtful that the audio head is picking up a track 11 mm away.

    If the A/C head is too low, it could be picking up part of the video tracks, although I've never heard what this sounds like myself. Just checked the manual and in my JVC deck, the A/C head is mounted on a triangular plate with three spring-loaded screws. Theoretically, if you loosen each by the same tiny amount, the head will rise minutely and may track better. Definitely an "AT YOUR OWN RISK" proposition, because it takes a scope and calibration tape to get the head into perfect alignment.
    Last edited by JVRaines; 25th Sep 2016 at 16:06.
    Quote Quote  
  4. Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Search PM
    Thanks for the help. I'll explore some of these options.
    Quote Quote  
  5. I may have some video that I transferred for a client a year ago where I had to deal with this. If so, I'll post a few seconds so you can hear it.
    Quote Quote  



Similar Threads