VideoHelp Forum

Try DVDFab and copy Ultra HD Blu-rays and DVDs! Or rip iTunes movies and music! Download free trial !
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9
Thread
  1. https://vimeo.com/182292394

    I wanted to put some footage together for a DVD of the dogs working the sheep, so I shot in 25fps. But if you have a look at this clip it is quite blurry and dizzying almost when the animals move quickly or the camera pans. What am I doing wrong?

    Panasonic GH3
    - 25fps, Shutter speed: 1/50
    Quote Quote  
  2. Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    United States
    Search Comp PM
    Vimeo encodes all footage submitted to them, so it's not much good to judge your issue. Perhaps you should
    upload a short clip to this forum directly

    Did you send Vimeo your original camera footage or did you do some kind of conversion first?
    Quote Quote  
  3. Actually, Vimeo allowed me to download the source video, a 1080p MOV file. It's not very sharp to begin with. To put it on DVD you will be downscaling from 1920x1080 to 720x576 will reduce the sharpness a bit more. If you want to reduce the motion blur you'll need to shoot with a faster shutter speed. But then your video will flicker more during high motion, high contrast, shots. High motion video like this will benefit (less flickering, more fluid motion) from shooting 1080p50 or 1080i25.
    Quote Quote  
  4. Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Actually, Vimeo allowed me to download the source video, a 1080p MOV file. It's not very sharp to begin with. To put it on DVD you will be downscaling from 1920x1080 to 720x576 will reduce the sharpness a bit more. If you want to reduce the motion blur you'll need to shoot with a faster shutter speed. But then your video will flicker more during high motion, high contrast, shots. High motion video like this will benefit (less flickering, more fluid motion) from shooting 1080p50 or 1080i25.
    Thanks for your response! I turned the sharpness down in my camera - as a beginner, I saw a lot about shooting 'flat' and turning all your settings down. So should I increase the sharpness in-camera or does it just need sharpening in post?

    I have shot in 1080p50 before but the results were very similar - the nature of the work meant that I was required to pan quite quickly which caused the shots to seem blurry and hard to watch. I'm wondering if something that might help is to try and shoot at a shorter focal length.
    Quote Quote  
  5. Turning up the sharpness in the camera should work better than doing so in software. But it's hard to say for sure since a sharper picture requires more bitrate -- so the camera may create more artifacts with a sharper picture. Use as much bitrate as the camera allows. All that detail in the grass is going to eat up bitrate. You'll have to experiment.

    To reduce motion blur you need to use a fast shutter speed like 1/250 or 1/1000 sec. But again, a clearer picture requires more bitrate so you may get more compression artifacts. At least you're shooting outdoors so you have a good amount of light.

    DSLR's generally aren't good for high motion video like this.
    Quote Quote  
  6. Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Turning up the sharpness in the camera should work better than doing so in software. But it's hard to say for sure since a sharper picture requires more bitrate -- so the camera may create more artifacts with a sharper picture. Use as much bitrate as the camera allows. All that detail in the grass is going to eat up bitrate. You'll have to experiment.

    To reduce motion blur you need to use a fast shutter speed like 1/250 or 1/1000 sec. But again, a clearer picture requires more bitrate so you may get more compression artifacts. At least you're shooting outdoors so you have a good amount of light.

    DSLR's generally aren't good for high motion video like this.
    Thanks! I'll try using a faster shutter speed. I usually shoot on a Canon XA20 but have experienced similar issues with motion.
    Quote Quote  
  7. Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    San Francisco, California
    Search PM
    If you zoom in and pan with your subject, the blurred background will be less noticeable. This is a frequently used effect (sharp subject, blurry background) that emphasizes motion and speed.
    Quote Quote  
  8. Yes, but the OP will have to mix zoom and wide shots so you can tell what's going on. And then you'll need two cameras and cameramen so you can cut between the zoom and wide shots -- unless you want to fake the action by mixing unrelated zoom and wide shots.
    Quote Quote  
  9. Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    San Francisco, California
    Search PM
    Fake the action? Heaven forfend!
    Quote Quote  



Similar Threads