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  1. Member
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    Hi, I'm looking for a linux (fedora or ubuntu) software able to produce a before/after effects in order to compare a video and its encoding equivalent. Are you aware of some valuable solution ?
    Thanks
    george
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  2. Originally Posted by georgeNgolo View Post
    Hi, I'm looking for a linux (fedora or ubuntu) software able to produce a before/after effects in order to compare a video and its encoding equivalent. Are you aware of some valuable solution ?
    Thanks
    george

    Have a look at popular linux video editors eg. kdenlive, openshot, lightworks, even blender

    Be careful about "producing" a video if your goal is comparison, because using lossy compression will impair the comparison, introducing another generation of artifacts
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  3. Member racer-x's Avatar
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    If you feel adventurous, you can install Wine and use some "Windows" tools also. I'm running Aviutl, Virtualdub and Avisynth (among others) just fine in Linux under Wine.
    Got my retirement plans all set. Looks like I only have to work another 5 years after I die........
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  4. I'm a Super Moderator johns0's Avatar
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    Thread moved to the linux forum where you can get more help.
    I think,therefore i am a hamster.
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    Thank you so much for your answers. Those software are awesome.
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    Originally Posted by poisondeathray View Post

    Be careful about "producing" a video if your goal is comparison, because using lossy compression will impair the comparison, introducing another generation of artifacts
    What do you mean by "another generation of artifacts" ? and how to detect it ?
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  7. Originally Posted by georgeNgolo View Post
    Originally Posted by poisondeathray View Post

    Be careful about "producing" a video if your goal is comparison, because using lossy compression will impair the comparison, introducing another generation of artifacts
    What do you mean by "another generation of artifacts" ? and how to detect it ?


    Lossy compression means bits of data are thrown out. Each time you do it - it gets worse

    An analogy - If you're familiar with audio, MP3 is a lossy format. If you re-encode a MP3 over and over, after a few times it sounds like garbage. You can minimize the quality loss by using higher bitrates, but you still lose quality each time

    Lossless video compression means decoded image is mathematically equivalent . Each time you decompress, recompress, no quality is lost. An analogy in audio would be lossless "flac" compression
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    Ok i see, thank you very much !
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  9. Have a look at popular linux video editors eg. kdenlive, openshot, lightworks, even blender
    Last edited by acheter; 28th Nov 2016 at 10:14.
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    I dunno, but the 1st post says "compare a video and its encoding equivalent". This sounds like a video quality analyser to me. There are some for Linux AFAIK but I don't actually think any of them actually work very well. Certainly not as well as your eyes. See this:

    http://askubuntu.com/questions/232677/are-there-tools-to-measure-video-quality
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    It was more for detecting a color shift than for real quality check. But you are right, quality metrics, and specially SSIM are quite relevant. Even if I didn't test it already, I have heard that Netflix created a new one recently : VMAF which seems quite awesome.
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  12. Originally Posted by georgeNgolo View Post
    It was more for detecting a color shift than for real quality check.
    For a color shift, the traditional tool to use is a vectorscope . You just switch back and forth and it's easy to detect a shift and in what direction

    eg. in kdenlive
    https://kdenlive.org/users/granjow/introducing-color-scopes-vectorscope
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    Thanks !
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