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  1. hi i am currently converting my vhs tapes to dvd using
    dvd recorder and vcr .
    The vcr is Sharp with 6 heads
    LG dvd recorder hooked up by a scart.

    i'm getting this issue i don't know how to explain whether its a jitter or a shake but it does this every so often the picture becomes distorted .I have attached a video its really shot
    Its frustrating please if anyone knows please reply

    thanks
    Image Attached Files
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  2. That's an Ep tape right? jvc vcr's have a feature to fix that (vertical stabilizer or something like that)
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  3. It is good that you provided a clip because I don't think the words "jitter" or "shake" correctly describe the problem. Perhaps "wavy" is a better word.

    Here is a frame from your clip, for those who don't want to download your clip:



    My NLE (Vegas) even has an effect called "Wave" that looks quite a bit like your video:



    Your clip is so short that is difficult to tell whether this problem comes and goes, or is there all the time.

    If you have manipulated that video prior to posting the clip, and it only looked like this after you did things to it, you may have re-sized interlaced video without deinterlacing. Post #4 in this Videohelp forum thread shows an example of what this looks like:

    Resize Interlaced Video Without Deinterlacing

    This is the image from that post:



    If the waviness is there most of the time, could be some sort of AC hum and might indicated a ground loop. The usual solution to this is to make sure the VCR and capture source are connected to the same plug, and that you have not installed any three-prong to two-prong converters on any equipment in your capture chain.

    It might be a TBC issue, but I'll leave it to others to comment on that. Usually, such errors don't produce a regular wavy pattern like you are seeing. The significant horizontal deviation and the regularity, top to bottom, is what makes me think that AC might be involved.
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  4. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    That's not a timing issue. That's an interference pattern.
    TBC won't help.
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  5. Yeah it's Lp

    Originally Posted by themaster1 View Post
    That's an Ep tape right? jvc vcr's have a feature to fix that (vertical stabilizer or something like that)
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  6. The DVD recorder is also connected to the capture device called advc 55 canopus
    I thought that is the issue but even when I had the DVD recorder connected to the vcr alone it still did this wavy thing. It doesn't do it with all vhs tapes. It's more on lp than sp
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  7. If you just view the tape on your TV, without the capture device connected in any way, does the waviness show up on the TV set? I'm asking in order to see if we can rule out everything in the capture chain and instead focus on the tape itself, the VCR, or the power quality.

    If the problem happens on the TV, then the usual thing to try is to play the tape on another VCR, if you have one.
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  8. Dinosaur Supervisor KarMa's Avatar
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    Looks like there is a tracking issue as the image jumps up slightly, perhaps one line, and then the deinterlacer flips out creating that wavy effect. The tracking improves, and so the image drops and the deinterlacer works again. I see this wavy effect a lot with interlaced videos that are resized without deinterlacing first.
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  9. Originally Posted by KarMa View Post
    I see this wavy effect a lot with interlaced videos that are resized without deinterlacing first.
    I mentioned this in my post above, and provided an example. However, the curvy nature of the pattern isn't what I've usually seen. If you take a look at the image in this thread:

    repair bad deinterlacing

    you'll see another example of resizing without deinterlacing. You tend to get a discontinuity between one group of scan lines and the next group, rather than a continuous shift like the OP's video.

    I'm not saying that this couldn't be caused by that, but I'm starting to think it unlikely. If the OP tells us that the video looks like this before it is digitized/captured, then it must be something else.
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  10. Dinosaur Supervisor KarMa's Avatar
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    Also have to wonder why this video is 720p.
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  11. This video is a still shot so the only way it could develop this type of waviness from resizing is if a horizontal time base error causes one field to be periodically shifted horizontally.
    Last edited by jagabo; 13th May 2016 at 07:32.
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  12. i captured it from the dvd player recording so i could show it here what the wavy effect is. i accidentally rendered to 720p.

    Originally Posted by KarMa View Post
    Also have to wonder why this video is 720p.
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  13. i tried it, and it doesn't show when the tv and vcr connected.




    Originally Posted by johnmeyer View Post
    If you just view the tape on your TV, without the capture device connected in any way, does the waviness show up on the TV set? I'm asking in order to see if we can rule out everything in the capture chain and instead focus on the tape itself, the VCR, or the power quality.

    If the problem happens on the TV, then the usual thing to try is to play the tape on another VCR, if you have one.
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  14. Originally Posted by kt2016 View Post
    i tried it, and it doesn't show when the tv and vcr connected.
    OK, so it looks just fine when you simply play the tape and watch it on your TV. That rules out any problem with the original tape, or with the VCR.

    I just read a little about the SCART connection. I'm in the USA and have never seen this connection or used it, but from the Wiki entry, I can see how it might be capable of screwing up the video. It looks like it was originally a French standard. They use Secam. Are your tapes Secam or PAL?

    I think someone with direct experience with SCART is going to have to help you the rest of the way, but my final contribution is to suggest that you look at all the SCART settings and play around with those. Alternatively, if you can do the capture with a different connection, try that.
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  15. Dinosaur Supervisor KarMa's Avatar
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    My understanding of SCART output from a VCR/DVD is that it simply carries the composite video signal on one of the wires, just like a yellow RCA cable.
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  16. SCART can carry composite, s-video, or RGB. But they're all at standard definition PAL scan rates (576i).

    To the OP: try fast forwarding your tapes to the end, then rewind them back to the beginning. That may loosen the windings and reduce drag that might cause this type of problem. Then try another cap. It would also be useful to know if the problem happens at the same place in the video every time, or if it happens at different places each time.

    And obviously, try a different VHS deck.
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  17. Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    To the OP: try fast forwarding your tapes to the end, then rewind them back to the beginning. That may loosen the windings and reduce drag that might cause this type of problem. Then try another cap. It would also be useful to know if the problem happens at the same place in the video every time, or if it happens at different places each time.

    And obviously, try a different VHS deck.
    I thought he said that the picture looked fine when viewed on his TV set. Therefore, would the rewind trick do anything? I guess that a different deck might still make a difference if there is something wrong with the output being fed to the capture hardware, if that is a different connection than what is feeding the TV set.

    [edit] Here is a link to a page showing one of several ways that AC hum can appear in the picture:

    Ground Loop Hum

    Scroll down the page to see the image.
    Last edited by johnmeyer; 13th May 2016 at 21:46. Reason: Added link to ground loop image
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  18. Originally Posted by johnmeyer View Post
    I thought he said that the picture looked fine when viewed on his TV set. Therefore, would the rewind trick do anything?
    TVs are more forgiving of time base errors than most capture devices. And... Apparently he tried the TV after the caps, so maybe the windings loosened up already. Still, it's worth a try.
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  19. Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    TVs are more forgiving of time base errors than most capture devices. And... Apparently he tried the TV after the caps, so maybe the windings loosened up already. Still, it's worth a try.
    Good points.
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