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  1. Member
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    hey

    I'm going to rip my whole Dvd and bluray collection, so i can see it on Plex through my Apple TV.

    I use Pavtube Bdmagic to rip my dvds and blurays and the files ending up being really big and i don't know how to store all the files. A ripped Dvd is 20gb big and with over 500 dvds, i'm not even close to have enough space on my PC.

    the picture and sound quality of the dvds/blurays is really important for me, and want the best as possible copy of the movies, that is why i chose Pavtube.

    Is there anyone who knows an another/smarter way to store the ripped dvd/bluray files? or do i really need to use a lot of money on external harddrives?

    Really hope someone can help me
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  2. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    If you are "ripping", AND you want to maintain the quality, those are the filesizes you should expect (usually ~8 GB for DVD and ~45GB for BD, per disc/side).

    Get more drive space, or rip+convert.
    The conversion will include re-encoding, which is where you will lose quality, but by using a more efficient codec (h265, h264, vp9, depending on your needs), you can minimize the loss to acceptable (to you) levels AND lower the bitrate (and thus filesize) to acceptable levels.
    But with 500+ titles, it sounds like you would end up needing more drive space, regardless.

    Oh and PAVTube may or may not be your best option when it comes to re-encoding quality (depending on what's really under the hood and its settings).

    Scott
    Last edited by Cornucopia; 27th Apr 2016 at 06:14.
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  3. Member
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    thanks for the reply

    what will be the best option to re-encoding quality?

    i was wondering, what if i store all of it in my dropbox?
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  4. Member
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    I don't know why your ripped DVD is 20GB in size because a DVD is usually anywhere between 4GB to 7GB, Now a Bluray disk will be much larger, Usually going anywhere from 20GB to 45GB, I don't use Pavtube so maybe that program is doing something wrong, You might want to give DVDFab or AnyDVD a try for ripping to hard drive.
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    There is a free decryption program available for DVD's and Blu-ray. It is called MakeMKV. It will only rip to MKV files when starting with a DVD, but you can rip to an MKV or a complete copy using Backup mode when working with Blu-ray. You will need to put in a new beta key every 60 days or so to keep using it for free, or install new versions as they are released. The keys are found here: http://www.makemkv.com/forum2/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=1053

    MakeMKV will not compress anything, so if you want smaller files for storage, you should look at Handbrake or Vidcoder for this process after you have the decrypted movie on the hard drive. Both programs are free. Final size of the output is really up to you and the settings you choose.

    Select the High Profile preset and adjust it from there with the Settings button. Personally, I'd use the programs in Constant Quality mode for the video, and Constant Framerate (you will have to select this manually since both programs are idiotically set up for Variable Framerate by default). Set the Constant Quality at 18 for DVD's and 20 for Blu-ray just to see if this is enough compression for you. If not, move to 20 and 22 respectively.
    Last edited by Kerry56; 27th Apr 2016 at 10:24. Reason: clarity/removed typo
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  6. I'm a Super Moderator johns0's Avatar
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    The op is using a mac and there is no version of vidcoder for that.
    I think,therefore i am a hamster.
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  7. You've laid out your options pretty well, I've been down most of those roads over the past 15+ years.

    As far as recoding, for Bluray's I've stuck with MeGUI to create MKV's, processing the subtitles with Suprip and such, and utilizing BD25's (cost has stabilized to somewhat less than $.70cents per inkjet hub printable for several years), so that size is my 'target' for recoding), storing on large-scale NAS machines (7 drive bays Thecus models have been the 'sweet spot' cost wise, drives of course continue their downward spiral to where the 6TB is the current good price per MB, using RAID6 so 5 X 6TB = 30TB per machine). I've lusted after one of the large 16 drive boxes for quite a while (cost: ~$9K+ with 6TB drives so thats 84TB) and they have good expansion beyond that with 'daisey chaining'.

    Storing all these both in physical BD25's and on the NAS so even if/when the NAS goes south, the backups are right in front of me. I utilize large binders (Avery Heavy Duty Extra Wide model 03120) bought in bulk from whatever office supply place has them 'on sale' for generally around <$9ea,, filled with holders (8 per) so around 8 holder per binder so 64 discs held total per. I have a whole wall crammed with these (some 100+ binders) so you can figure how much I have 'processed' over the years.

    But in the last year, 50GB (dual-layer) Bluray blanks have fallen down to the <1.80 level, buying in bulk is as low as $1.60/ea., so no recoding nessesary at all. Two things to keep in mind:

    1. You may need a new burner that reliably will do dual-layer; I bought a new Pioneer BDXL type that works great, although my older Pioneer (at least 6+ years old) works okay I guess, didn't want to waste my time/effort though if something did go off the tracks.

    2. The one thing that kinda did is, I've used IMGBurn forever, all the way back to doing DVD5/9's, but it has problems with BD/DL discs which, so far, the programmer has decided not to (so far) address; luckily, the s/w will error out BEFORE starting to do the burn, so you don't make a coaster, but I found good free s/w that worked perfectly (so far!).

    The hang up in all of this still remains, how does one 'play' all these things one produces? Consumer dvd/bluray players generally really don't do MKV's all that well, I have a collection of (cheap) Samsung and Sony drives that play MKV's out of the box, but don't do basic things like 'see' the chapters or subtitles (PGS or otherwise). I found that Popcorn Hour made a box year ago that did both network streaming AND played BD discs perfectly, so I bought a few of them (model C200 with easy BD Drive install) and they've worked great.

    Zoom forward 10+ years, and most everybody (including Popcorn Hour, Dune, etc) have left doing any physical disc playing far behind, concentrating on 'streaming' whether locally or over the internet (trying to do compete with the likes of Roku). Not a good idea, none of them comes close to any of the dedicated boxes for that.

    About the only thing left that does physical discs, and does it right playing h.264 MKV with PGS subtitles (you'll spend more time redoing subs if you decide not to simply use the PGS subs directly, but finding a machine that plays them is a task in itself) is really down to Oppo, and the cheapest box they currently make is $499 (but does do local network streaming as well as actual discs, and like I said in the above paragraph, they're trying to do internet streaming but well short of what a cheap <$100 Roku does) so you can take a look at it, but it does do upscaling to 4K so it you have a new 4K tv it's 'nice'.

    All this 'stuff' is available on Amazon these days, whether or not you'll find better prices hunting around is a maybe. But it's all doable, think in advance just what you'll want to have at the end of x years 'processing'. You may end up with an entire room in your house full of machines and binders (I have!).

    Now that the BD50's pricing has eliminated all the recoding (I have a large multicore machine I had built just for that purpose) I'm trying to make the transition to get off MKV's and process totally with tsmuxr but once again, the PGS subtitles bite the big one, as I can't seem to find any way to (consistantly) make the subtitles turn 'on' by default (I've used BDinfo for years to do stuff) like is so easy to do with mkvmerge and that way all the consumer level players would 'play' any of my discs going forward. Oh well, maybe I'll be planted before my PCH boxes give up or Oppo decides to go out of business.
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  8. Member
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    Originally Posted by johns0 View Post
    The op is using a mac and there is no version of vidcoder for that.
    Sometimes I wish the Mac users would just put a giant sign on their posts so we could weed them out without investigating their current tools.

    Stick with the Mac versions of MakeMKV and Handbrake then.
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  9. Member
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    My $0.02

    RIP / convert the main movie (and extras if desired) with MakeMKV. Youíll lose the menu structure, but thatís okay.*
    Keep the converted DVDs as their original size. Theyíre already small enough, ~4-9 gigs as mentioned above and donít really recompress well.

    Keep your favorite Blu-Rays (especially though with high movement / action as this doesnít compress will without artifacts) as their original size. This will give you the best possible quality.
    Re-encode the remaining Blu-Rays with the encoder of your choice to a smaller size. I see ~9Gb as an often suggested as a good quality / size compromise.**

    Keep in mind that just RIPPING your collection will take weeks / months to complete and additional multiples of weeks / months to re-encode. ***

    Display quality is moving at an extremely quick pace, 4K, HDR and beyond. Whatís acceptable on your display today wonít be in the next year or two on your next display device.

    *AFAIK Plex doesnít support DVD/Blu-Ray menus or .ISOs, so nothing is lost by keeping only the main movie and/or extras.

    **Iím really not familiar with re-encoding Blu-Rays (or DVDs) because I keep everything at their original size since theyíre already high compressed from the original source and HD space is cheap.

    ***Figuring an average of 20 minutes to RIP a disc (best case for me is ~10 min for a DVD, ~30 min for Blu-Ray, usually much longer), 500 discs would take 10,000 min / 60 min (per hour) = ~167 hours. Thatís a monthís work at 40 hours a week just RIPPING, no re-encoding.
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  10. Member
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    An additional $0.02...

    Uploading to Dropbox or any other type of online storage is extremely impractical for several reasons:

    No affordable online storage allows streaming. You would have to download (and temporarily store) your video to watch it.

    Unless you have a symmetrical internet connection (very expensive), your upload speed is a fraction of your download (e.g. 50 Mbps down / 10Mbps up) and the faster you upload, the slower your download speed is. Example: At 10Mbps (megabits per second), a DVD5 (4.37GB) would take at least 28 minutes to upload and your download would either slow to a crawl or completely stop as you approach max upload speed. Any glitch during the upload and you would have to start again.

    Even if you found an online site that would allow storage and live streaming of your videos, you wouldn't get anywhere near the video quality of local streaming. Even Netflix has difficulty streaming files that are highly optimized for that purpose.


    A few years back, the owner of a company I worked for thought it would be a good idea to switch from our local hard drive backup system to the cloud. I almost LOL when the Sale Rep explained that it would take 2-3 months to transfer our 600GB+ existing backup to the cloud since we could only the upload during off-hours and since we created large design files daily, they may not always be completely backed before the start of the new work day.
    Last edited by lingyi; 28th Apr 2016 at 00:53.
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  11. Ĺ way to Rigel 7 cornemuse's Avatar
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    You're keeping the original disks, yes?

    Try ripping/recoding & viewing to see if this "compressed" version is acceptable, , ,

    I have a dozen or so 1 t hdds with 95% of the movies = the movie only, none 'compressed', all dvd's, no bluerays. (<- I cant tell the difference)

    -c-
    Cranky Old Man
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  12. As folks have somewhat pointed out, it's the 'backend' of your idea wher it gets into probs. Local storage (hd or optical) is the only real solution, systems like plex only add 'frosting' to the system.

    Years ago well before all this streaming was much of anything, I went with pch (popcorn hour) boxes to stream from large nas boxes, using smb with blu/optical as an option. The BD25's were a good backup, and I use encrypted usenet as an ultimate backup, run 24/7 at 10mbs feeding that.

    Extremely few folks even have access to full-duplex (same speed up/down), although docsis3.1 may change that is the next couple of years, only price will tell. I'm lucky in that I'm retired but still do some work from home so my comcast business bill is paid for by my employer. What a deal (!).

    It's all what you want to accomplish. With a side of the changing landscape/tech. My solution worked 10 years agi and still works today, at good costings. I'd go with a plex type system if I need to stream to a smartphone or something on the internet, I've looked at a small NUC box to process the stream and such, but I'm pretty much house-bound at this point and my smb/pch system wirks just fine, just not 'flashy'.
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