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  1. I have saved files from a fellow's Katch.me account (that saved videos from Pariscope broadcasts of his). They all need to be rotated and converted to a more friendly format that I can work with. Problem is, they are unable to open in Sony Vegas, or any of the other converters and editors that I have. I tried demuxing with TsMuxer and Avidemux without any success. Does anyone have a better solution to work with these difficult files? I have one of the files uploaded as an example for any of you to work with if interested. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

    https://forum.videohelp.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=36784&stc=1&d=1461688384
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  2. You can batch rewrap them into MP4 with ffmpeg, that will allow you to import into vegas

    Here is an example of the code for one:
    Code:
    ffmpeg -i "RENETTO20160417_01 Just catching up.ts" -map 0:1 -map 0:2 -c:v copy -bsf:a aac_adtstoasc -c:a copy -loglevel quiet "RENETTO20160417_01 Just catching up.mp4"
    Benefit of re-wrapping is no quality loss, very fast because the streams are just "copied" into another container

    A potential problem is the framerate is a bit "off" , although it's in sync, it may cause vegas problems with a lot of clips. So another option is to re-encode to a lossless or near lossless format and convert to a more standardized framerate
    Image Attached Files
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  3. I was going to suggest you can batch rotate with ffmpeg as well, but it looks like in this clip there are different rotations in different sections (ground plane is on the left at the start, but on the right at the end), so it would probably be better to manually do that in vegas or a NLE if this guy is rotating all over

    A batch file for re-wrapping all the .ts file in a folder to .mp4 would look something like this. If you had another drive for storage I would specify the output files in a different directory (faster), currently the output is in the same directory as the input files

    Code:
    for %%a in ("*.ts") do ffmpeg -i "%%a" -map 0:1 -map 0:2 -c:v copy -bsf:a aac_adtstoasc -c:a copy -loglevel quiet "%%~na.mp4"
    pause
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  4. Originally Posted by poisondeathray View Post
    I was going to suggest you can batch rotate with ffmpeg as well, but it looks like in this clip there are different rotations in different sections (ground plane is on the left at the start, but on the right at the end), so it would probably be better to manually do that in vegas or a NLE if this guy is rotating all over

    A batch file for re-wrapping all the .ts file in a folder to .mp4 would look something like this. If you had another drive for storage I would specify the output files in a different directory (faster), currently the output is in the same directory as the input files

    Code:
    for %%a in ("*.ts") do ffmpeg -i "%%a" -map 0:1 -map 0:2 -c:v copy -bsf:a aac_adtstoasc -c:a copy -loglevel quiet "%%~na.mp4"
    pause
    Thank you for the suggestions. I'm very unfamiliar with ffmpeg. The fact that I have to use command lines and a command prompt type of thing freaks me out to be honest. I'm not used to command line type interfaces. I was hoping for something a bit more intuitive to guys like me who are used to graphical interfaces.

    As far as the rotations are concerned, I also noticed that the videos rotate in several different ways throughout. That is why I need to import them into Vegas where I can split the clips where the rotations change and adjust accordingly. I hate having to recompress and encode, but I suppose there is no other way around it. I do want to get these encoded in a more cleaner format anyway for less glitchy playback in any main media players.

    I'll see if I can learn this ffmpeg thing. If there are any easier alternatives, please let me know.
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  5. You don't really have to "learn" it for this - You can just copy and paste for now and "learn" it at your leisure sometime in the future.

    It's actually very easy. Try these steps out on a folder of a few files as a small test

    1) download ffmpeg.exe and place it or a copy of it in the folder of files to be converted
    2) open a notepad text document in the same folder, copy and paste the code above, save it, rename extension from .txt to .bat (e.g. it might be batch.txt renamed to batch.bat)
    3) double click the .bat file


    Originally Posted by ShaneJensen View Post
    I do want to get these encoded in a more cleaner format anyway for less glitchy playback in any main media players.

    Part of the reason for the "gitchy" playback is the low framerate - you won't be able to get around that unless you try some optical flow / motion interpolation techniques by interpolating new "inbetween" frames. But that has potential problems as well, including introducing motion artifacts

    Severe compression artifacts as well, so if you re-encode you might consider denoising or processing. The filesize will balloon up because of those artifacts if you recompress
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  6. Originally Posted by poisondeathray View Post
    You don't really have to "learn" it for this - You can just copy and paste for now and "learn" it at your leisure sometime in the future.

    It's actually very easy. Try these steps out on a folder of a few files as a small test

    1) download ffmpeg.exe and place it or a copy of it in the folder of files to be converted
    2) open a notepad text document in the same folder, copy and paste the code above, save it, rename extension from .txt to .bat (e.g. it might be batch.txt renamed to batch.bat)
    3) double click the .bat file


    Originally Posted by ShaneJensen View Post
    I do want to get these encoded in a more cleaner format anyway for less glitchy playback in any main media players.

    Part of the reason for the "gitchy" playback is the low framerate - you won't be able to get around that unless you try some optical flow / motion interpolation techniques by interpolating new "inbetween" frames. But that has potential problems as well, including introducing motion artifacts

    Severe compression artifacts as well, so if you re-encode you might consider denoising or processing. The filesize will balloon up because of those artifacts if you recompress
    Ah yes. I got it. Thank you so much. What I'm doing is importing the fixed files into Vegas because there are all these rotations I have to do. Each time Paul (the guy in the video) switches between front and rear camera on his iPhone, the rotation is 180 degrees difference. So I have to split the clip each time he switches camera view and apply the correct rotation. Then render. I suppose I should render a little bit of a higher bitrate than the originals so that it's close to lossless? Any other rendering tips in Vegas I should consider?

    Thank you so much for your help. It is greatly appreciated.
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  7. These are pretty low bitrate (~100kbps), low quality. You're going to need a lot more to make it similiar in quality, because of the compression artifacts (it's decompressed in vegas, then you have to recompress it) . I would do some mini tests in vegas to see what types of bitrates you're going to need, but I'd guess roughly 5-10x . If filesize is a major concern for you, then I would consider using another encoder such as x264. Also you might consider trying to denoise or filter it to improve compression efficiency

    The audio isn't the greatest either, so you're going to need to bump that bitrate up too. If you're not editing (beside rotating), not joining segments, I would consider just stream copying the audio instead of re-encoding it. The video requires re-encoding because of the rotation manipulation, but the audio doesn't necessarily unless you're actually editing
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  8. Originally Posted by poisondeathray View Post
    These are pretty low bitrate (~100kbps), low quality. You're going to need a lot more to make it similiar in quality, because of the compression artifacts (it's decompressed in vegas, then you have to recompress it) . I would do some mini tests in vegas to see what types of bitrates you're going to need, but I'd guess roughly 5-10x . If filesize is a major concern for you, then I would consider using another encoder such as x264. Also you might consider trying to denoise or filter it to improve compression efficiency

    The audio isn't the greatest either, so you're going to need to bump that bitrate up too. If you're not editing (beside rotating), not joining segments, I would consider just stream copying the audio instead of re-encoding it. The video requires re-encoding because of the rotation manipulation, but the audio doesn't necessarily unless you're actually editing
    Yeah, I noticed the bitrate is very low. I'm rendering it using 4,000kbps for video and 320kbps for audio. That should be enough. I'll pass on the denoising and stream copying the audio. I doubt any of that will make any noticeable difference to the human eye and ear and doubt it's worth it anyway considering the low quality of the original. I'm going to keep the original .ts and the fixed .mp4 files archived in a projects folder in case I decide to use another rendering technique or software in the future. Space is not an issue for me one bit because I have many terabytes available to me and many external hard drives.
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    The video stream timestamps are buggy in these downloads from katch.me. That's why Vegas refuses to load them. Remuxing alone won't help. The way to fix it is to supply a frame rate parameter to ffmpeg. Before the "-i" option, insert "-r 7.5 " which means "ignore the timestamps and force a rate of 7.5 fps."
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