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  1. Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    United States
    Search Comp PM
    In the video I provided I have tried to point out the details I need to know in getting the Ethernet port in my bedroom upstairs working.

    In editing the video I had one more thought; do I need to connect the patch panel to my router or the modem instead of the concept I have in the video? Thanks

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KMZbLkYrkmY

    I need to connect the Xbox One upstairs to the internet not using WiFi. On WiFi, I only get 3 Mbps. My Xbox 360 is usually 13, my PC is 33. My tablet/cellphone run fine for watching videos online.

    We have one master bedroom downstairs which has no Ethernet port in the walls. Upstairs there is one master bedroom with the other of the full baths-this is the room I need internet in.

    There is one Ethernet port downstairs in the living room which is not needed, it has no connection. The home was wired for Ethernet but none of the ports work when plugged in. I tested it by plugging in laptops to ports in the room, turning off WiFi then trying to connect to the internet.

    In the video, I try to point out everything how is is now. I would like to know if I could cut off the end of the patch cables, then using the crimper tool, put the RJ45 connector on the end to plug in directly to the router.
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  2. That should work. There are two different configurations for terminating the cable though so you need to make sure if the existing port is using an A or B configuration and make sure you terminate the RJ45 jack the same way. The problem I'm seeing is this seems to be connected for neither of those configurations. They seem to have paired all the colors up in the block, which matches neither an A or B configuration. This may be why it isn't working correctly for you if you are connecting to the existing system. This also assumes a proper switch is in place to route all those connections. Theoretically it should still work so long as they've terminated the wall jacks the same as they have at the distribution point. I don't see any sort of switch in that panel. I have a feeling this isn't truly meant for internet connectivity. Are you sure this isn't for phones? A lot of newer houses have been using Cat5 for phone networks instead of standard phone line. Even so your plan could still work, but you want to check both ends and terminate them properly for internet use.
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  3. Mod Neophyte Super Moderator redwudz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    USA
    Search Comp PM
    My home was wired with RJ45 sockets, plugboards in the AV junction box and CAT6 cable also, but not for Ethernet, for multiple phone lines.
    I couldn't get any of it to work.

    I pulled all the wires out of the plugboards and changed the ends to regular RJ45 plugs, then added a 8 connector Ethernet switch.

    I ended replacing all the RJ45 sockets in the house with the correct ones as the socket color codes didn't make sense. I wouldn't assume your sockets were for Ethernet.

    I used a device that checks for the correct orientation:
    http://www.homedepot.com/p/DataShark-RJ45-Network-Cable-Tester-with-Case-and-Patch-Cor...0025/205972192

    It was a bit pricy, but saved a lot of frustration and I still use it for making up LAN cables and testing them.

    If I ever sell the house, the next owner will have fun with the phone system connections.
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  4. Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    United States
    Search Comp PM
    Thanks to you both for the fast reply. Based on the info here, I'm going to pass on the project, instead I'm going to go the powerline kit.
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  5. Powerline will cost more and not be nearly as good of a connection as the ethernet. This can be a very simple fix with the existing setup. It's literally just connecting an RJ45 plug on one of those cables and putting an RJ-45 jack on the other end, both wired to the same pattern. That's it.
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  6. Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    United States
    Search Comp PM
    I'm trying to follow you here, this is very new to me. I'd just need to pop off the outlet to know which method it's configured then do that downstairs? Until I've got the everything for that could this link help?

    https://support.xbox.com/en-US/xbox-one/networking/connect-live-using-pc
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  7. You could do that. You'll need a computer with two LAN ports though to do it. Can you get a photo of the jack upstairs?

    This is how to punch cable into a keystone jack.
    https://youtu.be/sHy8mtW9eak

    And this is how to terminate cable on the other end.
    https://youtu.be/482VtesZwZ8
    Last edited by Poppa_Meth; 1st Mar 2016 at 12:45.
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  8. Standard order is Orange-White, Orange. Green-white, Blue, Blue-White, Green, Brown-white, Brown. Note that pairs 1+2, and 3+6, are of the same color. The exact colors used do not matter, as long as 1+2, and 3+6, are from the same color and in the same order on each end. These are the only wires used and the other four can be omitted, however, particularly for the cable termination, using all eight makes it stronger. Note the plastic ram in the termination end, make sure the outer insulation for the entire cable is under this ram, with just the single wires plus their colored insulation, this is not thick enough to give a secure clamp and the cable will be unreliable over time.

    Sounds like your cable was done by phone guys, they do not adhere to proper standards. Probably the wires are untwisted several inches behind the jack, this is not to spec and may cause problems. Proper spec is the wires remain twisted right up to the jack itself and should not be visible outside the jack.

    On the jacks they do not go in order but there is a printed key on the jack, on the cable termination ends they go in numerical order. Just make certain both ends are done the same way.
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  9. That's not quite correct Nelson37. Gigabit connections require all 8 wires to be used. 10/100 only requires 4.
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