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  1. DVDFab just sent us a press release announcing the company will not support decryption of AACS 2.0. In the release the company stresses that it will never decrypt or circumvent AACS 2.0. Read the entire press release below:

    DVDFab Announces No AACS 2.0 Decryption to Crack the Next-Gen 4K UHD Blu-rays

    BEIJING — On February 25, 2016, Fengtao Software, the industry leader specializing in DVD, Blu-ray and video backup solutions,announced that the company will not crack or circumvent the next version Advanced Access Content System (publicly known as AACS), which will be used to protect the new Ultra HD (4K UHD) Blu-ray releases. Move on for the detailed story.

    The New Standard The BDA, short for the Blu-ray Disc Association, revealed in 2015 the next-generation Blu-ray standard, the Ultra HD Blu-ray Disc. The new 4K Blu-ray format features a resolution of 3840 x 2160, and supports high dynamic range (HDR), higher frame rates (up to 60 frames per second), as well as object-based immersive sound, such as Dolby Atmos and DTS:X. As to the encoding, the video will be encoded under the High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard, aka H.265, and use 10-bit color depth and the Rec. 2020 color space. Next, Samsung Corporation, the South Korean consumer electronics giant, introduced world’s first Ultra HD Blu-ray player during the IFA 2015. It is believed that other companies will follow suit 1Q 2016. And according to Amazon and some large Brick and Mortar stores, there are already several UHD Blu-ray titles on sale now in some locations, including The Martian, Kingsman: The Secret Service, and Exodus: Gods and Kings with more anticipated in March.

    The Next Version of AACS Copy Protection Accompanying those newly released Ultra HD Blu-ray titles is the version 2.0 of Advanced Access Content System. According to a document called AACS 2.0 Draft, the new copy protection requires the Ultra HD Blu-ray players to support two AACS 2.0 functionalities, one named “basic” and the other referred as “enhanced”. Furthermore, the Enhanced AACS 2.0 requires an internet connection upon the first playback of a specific Ultra HD Blu-ray disc. As to the reason, it is said that the live internet connection is a must to retrieve a key which is stored on the device. The document also indicates that HDCP 2.2 is required in order to fully support 4K content, and Ultra HD Blu-ray players will also come up with a new feature called Trusted Execution Environment where authenticated code can be executed, which is said to be an enhanced version of BD+.

    DVDFab Will Not Support Decryption of AACS 2.0 Although the debate as to whether or not it is legal to make backups of purchased commercial movie discs for personal home use has raged on for decades, the fact is that the decrypting of the copy protection never stops ever since the DVD age, and it’s not likely to stop in the foreseeable future. Now here comes the question: will there be a solution to crack AACS 2.0? Likely, there will be, publicly or secretly. However, Fengtao Software Inc. makes it clear that the company will not decrypt or circumvent AACS 2.0 in the days to come. This is in accordance with AACS-LA, (which has not made public the specifications for AACS 2.0), the BDA and the movie studios. Regarding Ultra HD support, DVDFab will concentrate development efforts on providing support for editing 4K/UHD content.

    Theads from http://www.myce.com/news/dvdfab-we-will-not-decrypt-or-circumvent-aacs-2-0-in-the-days...to-come-78698/
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    that really sucks. I wont buy any UHD BD if i cant make a backup.
    Lets hope Makemkv will crack it.
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    So, how much money did Fengtao receive for their "accordance"? Surely some hacker can find out.
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    I don't think they got paid off. More likely, they got threatened with renewed lawsuits and/or pressure on their means of payment for their current programs. Since Slysoft is out of the picture, they no longer have to compete with AnyDVD HD, and breaking the new Ultra HD Blu-ray encryption is no longer a priority.

    4k UHD Blu-ray is probably going to be a niche product, and they have to balance costs vs benefits. If someone else comes out with a UHD decryption program, they may change their minds and build their own, but I doubt we see that anytime in the next two years, unless some new company comes to the fore, or MakeMKV finds a way.
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  5. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    With new codecs (h.265, Atmos...), new colorspace (rec2020), new dynamics (HDR), new structure (extensions to M2TS), new encryption (AACS 2.x), new secure transmission (HDCP 2.2), new distribution (HDMI 2.0) and TXE (trusted exec. env), it'll more likely be 5-10 years before fully cracking. Plus being a niche/highest-end item, there won't be as much demand.
    This will go down just like SACD, which took almost a decade before a semi-loophole was possible).

    Don't hold your breath. (Just like I predicted - be careful what you wish for - streaming...)

    Scott
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    I would not be surprised if streaming continues to be the only way to view commercial UHD releases with a PC. It is hard to say if Cyberlink and Corel will want to spend the money needed to add the ability to play UHD Blu-Ray disks to their software, and even if they wanted to do it, the Blu-ray Disk Association might not be interested in licensing the technology for software players. Software players were the weak link that facilitated the development of Blu-Ray ripping software.
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  7. Renegade gll99's Avatar
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    Personally I could care less and have no interest in decrypting 4k discs for backup purposes. However I doubt the company could do it even if they wanted to so their announcement is moot. Don't forget that they didn't invent the process they are using now for DVD and BD.

    What is of interest to me in this topic is the comment about the need for an internet connection to play a device and content I would buy. How the heck do I use my legally bought 4KBD device and media at the cottage, on the road or if I don't have internet access at home? Do I have to carry it to MacDonald's, plug it in there and use their free wifi just to activate and match a disc to my device? What if I swap players does it become invalid on the other device or maybe both devices would be locked on some suspicion of something wrong? What if I have one player at home and one at the cottage. What if we have a movie night at a friends house? What if I sell the disc privately? Does that mean my disc is not transferable if somehow it is linked to my hardware. Content ownership argument aside, I'll be darned if I have to fight the movie industry over something I bought and legally own! Maybe I'm being extreme here but the possibilities and the privacy tracking is a big turnoff for me. I guess 4K movies on disc are out until the matter is clear.
    There's not much to do but then I can't do much anyway.
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  8. Formerly 'vaporeon800' Brad's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    It is hard to say if Cyberlink and Corel will want to spend the money needed to add the ability to play UHD Blu-Ray disks to their software
    CyberLink did announce their intention to support UHD-BD last year: http://www.cyberlink.com/prog/company/press-news-content.do?pid=3926

    We'll see...
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    Originally Posted by vaporeon800 View Post
    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    It is hard to say if Cyberlink and Corel will want to spend the money needed to add the ability to play UHD Blu-Ray disks to their software
    CyberLink did announce their intention to support UHD-BD last year: http://www.cyberlink.com/prog/company/press-news-content.do?pid=3926

    We'll see...
    There is another problem with UHD Blu-ray on the PC side. Video graphics adapters with HDMI 2.0 and HDCP 2.2 are uncommon at present and not inexpensive, so for many playback will be downgraded to what is allowed for HDMI 1.4 and HDCP.
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    There's more to it than just that. Most people will not have the disposable income to upgrade their home equipment to 4K from 1080p, especially if the 1080p system works fine. I put a lot of money into what I have now, so 4K is a way distant upgrade.
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    Whether intended to be or not, this is a smart strategic announcement.

    - Keeps people from hounding the company for a product that may or not eventually happen. Gives them lots of time to see how that new UHD standard plays out and whether it's worthwhile to pursue.
    - Keeps the UHD alliance from continually updating / fortifying the copy protection. "If it ain't broke, don't fix it"
    - Allows "someone else" to do the work. The company can avoid any association with the "someone else", even if they happen to share some info.

    Brilliant!
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    is UHD 4k, what the movie industry uses in Digital movies houses ?
    is this whole UHD consumer thing a 'trickle down" being pushed by both the movie industry (for content control) and the electronic entertainment industry trying to produce a new high end luxury device market ?
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  13. Originally Posted by gll99 View Post
    What is of interest to me in this topic is the comment about the need for an internet connection to play a device and content I would buy.
    It's like the Bluray consortium are determined to kill it off and ensure everyone turns to buying music online from places like itunes.

    I've never connected my Bluray player to the internet. It's pre-Cinavia and I want to keep it that way. The chances of me ever buying a UHD Bluray player seem to have plummeted to almost zero now. The idea of 4K doesn't excite me much anyway, although high dynamic range, Rec. 2020 and 10 bit sound promising. I suspect in the future a lot of claims regarding how much better 4k looks compared to 1080p will have little to do with resolution. Still, I can live without it. I don't care enough to connect a player to the internet in order to get permission to play a disc.
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  14. I am starting to head in the opposite direction. I watch most stuff on a 480p 20 inch LCD TV. I have abandoned upgrading to a Blu-ray burner because even though I like all that extra capacity to archive stuff, the cost and quality of the media has me concerned. To save room and to stay with blank DVD media I am finding that stuff I bring down to 480i or 360i don't look bad on a small screen. The files are smaller and I can stick with backing up with DVD.

    If one can continue to buy small TVs why not learn to be satisfied with less quality. I haven't the money to keep up with the Jones.
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  15. UHD 4K holds no interest for me, I have a big investment in my home theatre setup and I don't see the benefit of spending a considerable sum upgrading to UHD. 1080P looks good enough for my eyes and to get the same size 4K TV, 4K receiver, 4K Bluray I'd be looking at a huge investment.

    IMO, I think UHD 4K BR's will not become mainstream, they will be only for the well to do aficionados.
    It's not important the problem be solved, only that the blame for the mistake is assigned correctly
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  16. I won't be buying a UHD player.

    I haven't used my hardware BD players for years now (except for 3D BDs), and prefer playing main movie (in MKV container) from HTPC or Plex. A hardware player would be a retrograde step, IMO. And if I couldn't rip a UHD disc anyway, well, I won't buy into UHD discs either. It's my understanding that there are Blu Ray internal PC drives already that are capable of reading multi-layer BD discs, and therefore UHD discs. And supposedly Cyberlink will offer a software player (I think I read that at AVS). But no, ain't gonna do it. PowerDVD, ugh.

    UHD TVs are another story. If I had to replace a TV, no doubt it would be UHD, probably OLED as well. For HDR, rec2020 and 10 bit, not for the increased resolution. Premium 1080p sets are disappearing anyway, and UHD will progressively replace cheaper models as well.

    I can see watching UHD movies on Netflix, maybe. When I own a UHD TV. Eventually.

    [EDIT] Oh, I see vaporeon800 posted a link about Cyberlink as well.
    Last edited by fritzi93; 28th Feb 2016 at 10:59.
    Pull! Bang! Darn!
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    I have it from a broadcast insider, there are no TV transmitters capable of UHD
    YES SOME USE UHD cameras for sports events but that is only to get the sharpest picture possible
    After the signal is downlink to the studio for transmission it is processed and sent out like any other ASTC signal
    Its going to be many years before UHD is main stream, If ever
    Broadcast standards, have not even been developed..yet
    Much less the design for the equipment
    Broadcasters have huge sums invested in the recent change over to me astc
    Nobody is going be transmitting UHD for many years perhaps 20 or more
    BR UHD is going to remain a niche market, even if it becomes a reality
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    Originally Posted by theewizard View Post
    is UHD 4k, what the movie industry uses in Digital movies houses ?
    What is known as 4K in consumer electronics is actually UHD or 2160p, which is is not exactly the same thing as 4K in a digital theater.

    A UHD TV is 3840 x 2160 resolution. 4K in a digital theater is 4096 x 2160 resolution, but it may be cropped to accommodate other aspect ratios.
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    Originally Posted by theewizard View Post
    I have it from a broadcast insider, there are no TV transmitters capable of UHD
    YES SOME USE UHD cameras for sports events but that is only to get the sharpest picture possible
    After the signal is downlink to the studio for transmission it is processed and sent out like any other ASTC signal
    Its going to be many years before UHD is main stream, If ever
    Broadcast standards, have not even been developed..yet
    Much less the design for the equipment
    Broadcasters have huge sums invested in the recent change over to me astc
    Nobody is going be transmitting UHD for many years perhaps 20 or more
    BR UHD is going to remain a niche market, even if it becomes a reality
    UHD is part of the ATSC 3.0 spec, which will be finalized next year. No date has been established for the transition from ATSC 1.0 to ATSC 3.0, but I'm guessing it is no more than 10 years away, and it won't take 20 years for UHD transmissions to become available. An ATSC 3.0 UHD transmission was demonstrated at CES 2016.

    Converter boxes again...
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  20. Originally Posted by gll99 View Post
    What is of interest to me in this topic is the comment about the need for an internet connection to play a device and content I would buy. How the heck do I use my legally bought 4KBD device and media at the cottage, on the road or if I don't have internet access at home? Do I have to carry it to MacDonald's, plug it in there and use their free wifi just to activate and match a disc to my device? What if I swap players does it become invalid on the other device or maybe both devices would be locked on some suspicion of something wrong? What if I have one player at home and one at the cottage. What if we have a movie night at a friends house? What if I sell the disc privately? Does that mean my disc is not transferable if somehow it is linked to my hardware. Content ownership argument aside, I'll be darned if I have to fight the movie industry over something I bought and legally own!
    The goal is that you pay for the same product multiple times and your family members again. In any sort of payment, visiting cinema, buying disc, streaming package, cable ......
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  21. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by theewizard View Post
    is UHD 4k, what the movie industry uses in Digital movies houses ?
    is this whole UHD consumer thing a 'trickle down" being pushed by both the movie industry (for content control) and the electronic entertainment industry trying to produce a new high end luxury device market ?
    4k & 2k are what are used in Digital movie houses/cinemas. This means:
    Projected 3996 × 2160 for "Flat" 1.85:1 standard widescreen
    Projected 4096 × 1716 for "Scope" 2.39:1 Cinemascope extra-widescreen
    both contained in the standardized 4096 x 2160 DCI container (cropping/matting during projection)

    UHD1 "4k" TV and UHD2 "8k" TV use:
    3840 x 2160 16:9 widescreen
    and
    7680 x 4320 16:9 widescreen
    respectively.
    There may be 21:9 (aka 64:27) extra-widescreen variations, but they are not official/standardized (would likely use anamorphic pixels, NOT more pixels).

    As you can see, there is NOT a true 1:1 correspondence between DCI 4k and UHD 4k, though for all practical purposes there is (simple crop from 1.85:1 to 16:9, or minor resize with letterboxing).

    Scott
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  22. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    I own a 4k TV and love it. The benefits were worth the added cost when I got it, so I'm not complaining. Now that 4k is decently coming down in price there is little to avoid about it.

    Yes, it will be some time before BROADCASTING is wholly 4k (given that broadcasting still isn't wholly HD). Nor does it need to be. Not everything needs to be THE BEST ALL THE TIME. But @thewizard is mistaken, 4k cams are used a LOT in production. 4k equipment is in use in production & the head end - already. And 4k masters are being made for some projects (just being stored, and downrezzed for current consumption).

    UHD will always be an upscale market (in my lifetime), but that doesn't mean it won't be commonly available. Same for UHD BD. Broadcast UHD will probably take off in ~7 years (not 20 years, that's a bit too conservative an estimate). Internet UHD is already out there, but it will take much better end-to-end bandwidth to actually take advantage of it. The pittance bitrate currently being alloted for UHD probably makes the quality look like crap. But if Perseus and similar codecs actually do have an SBR-like ability to work within lower bitrates to ~enhance perceived quality, that may be the boost UHD needs until infrastructure is fully up to the task.

    AFA UHD BD and HDR/2020/10bit...
    A colleague of mine recently came back from a tech convention in Amsterdam, and he was like a kid in a candy shop, delighted about the new display offerings (both direct & projected displays). He said, "they were gloriously B*E*A*U*T*I*F*U*L, put you in an Alpha state" (and I respect his visual judgement as an engineer). What was sourcing those displays was direct, barely compressed proprietary UHD footage and UHD BD footage. Clearly, the benefit of these new batches of displays has to do with the expanded dynamics & colorspace, even more that resolution. And they're just around the corner...

    Scott
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    Broadcast transmission, is about the COST to deliver that broadcast
    Considering how long it took to get astc implemented and a government mandate to do it
    I think 7 years is a very optimistic view
    The whole infrastructure go carry the signal from the studio to the transmission tower , has to be standardised designed built an installed
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    Originally Posted by theewizard View Post
    Broadcast transmission, is about the COST to deliver that broadcast
    Considering how long it took to get astc implemented and a government mandate to do it
    I think 7 years is a very optimistic view
    The whole infrastructure go carry the signal from the studio to the transmission tower , has to be standardised designed built an installed
    I assume that MPEG2 compressed video is microwaved out to the tower, and the tower just broadcasts that. Which would mean that the microwave is already dealing with ~20Mbit data rate (~18MBit of actual video data). So for 4K, they could just microwave out a HEVC/VP9 ~18Mbit video with good results. Considering we would be skipping H.264 completely for OTA. And the FCC could keep their channel spectrum allotment intact, continuing to use NTSC channel bandwidth.

    The biggest cost I foresee would be on the consumer who would have to buy a TV with a ATSC 3.0 tuner, as their 1080p TV certainly doesn't have it. I don't even know how many of these 4K TVs have a ATSC 3.0 tuner, bringing up the awkward possibility of having to buy yet another 4K TV.
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  25. Hello, dear all.


    If DVDFAB will not make any attempt to crack the next-gen 4K Blu-ray UHD discs and Slysoft is gone for good, who will do it?


    Maybe Anydvd's redfox team will try it? Or they don't, to avoid any pressure by big companies to close down their doors as they did like Slysoft before?


    And wonder which type of protections such discs / content must have.


    Does anybody find out something? Does anybody get some disc and try to see how things works in such material?


    I wonder too if such protections will be much more stronger that normal Bluray discs have.


    One more question: does it possible AACS 2.0 decryption be strong like Denuvo Anti-Tamper ( for games discs / content )? Or be "adapted" from games content to "fit" into movies and videos material as movies, for example?


    ---> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denuvo


    I said that because Denuvo Anti-Tamper is a very strong protection on the market. Until now nobody could crack it properly. And I fear that if big companies could put it into 4K Blu-ray UHD discs in such a way that not even DVDFAB, now the defunct Slysoft or redfox team could not be able to solve it or defeat it.


    Thanks.

    Best regards.
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    @devilcoelhodog

    It isn't worth worrying about. UHD Blu-ray is years away from being mainstream. A great deal could change between now and then, and I am guessing that you don't have a UHD TV or a UHD Blu-ray player yet.

    The entertainment industry won't apply UHD Blu-Ray copy protection methods to regular Blu-ray. Doing so would prevent all existing Blu-ray players from playing newly released movies, and the entertainment industry would not want to deal with the repercussions from that situation.
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  27. Hi, dear all.


    See below too:


    ---> http://www.myce.com/news/anydvd-lead-developer-doesnt-rule-out-he-will-crack-aacs-2-0-78721/


    ---> https://forum.redfox.bz/threads/aacs-2-0.63572/


    ---> https://forum.redfox.bz/threads/anydvd-redfox-and-uhd-aacs-2-0-there-is-hope.68358/



    @ Pelvis Popcan said:

    Statistics show that discs are becoming more and more a smaller market, with the biggest money to be made from streaming. Requiring an Internet connection to play a disc might just be trying to kill off the disc market even faster.

    So, streaming will be the near / next future? All of us will need to have an internet connection / validation to view our movies and videos that we legally buy somewhere?


    @ usually_quiet

    It isn't worth worrying about. UHD Blu-ray is years away from being mainstream. A great deal could change between now and then, and I am guessing that you don't have a UHD TV or a UHD Blu-ray player yet.

    The entertainment industry won't apply UHD Blu-Ray copy protection methods to regular Blu-ray. Doing so would prevent all existing Blu-ray players from playing newly released movies, and the entertainment industry would not want to deal with the repercussions from that situation.

    Thanks for the tips!


    But, sometimes I feel scared about new protections from movies / videos contents and all the fuss they can do on all of us, the final customers.


    Best regards.


    devil (johner)
    Last edited by devilcoelhodog; 31st Mar 2016 at 12:08.
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