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  1. Back in the mid-late 2000s, it was always pretty important to be mindful of ensuring you used the correct video format for your region. PAL videos weren't ideal for playback in the US, due to the differing frame rates, resolution etc. However, with the advent of digital and most everything being streamed directly from a computer or tablet, I'm wondering if that's still a concern I should be on the look out for.

    For instance.

    If I were to play a video file that was encoded from a retail Blu-ray disc released in UK or ASIA (assuming it's encoded at full 1080p resolution, a full 24FPS and at a decent bitrate), would that video still play back no different than if I had a version from a retail US release? I assume that since we're operating outside the bonds of the disc medium, region specific video standards are no longer going to factor in? Or is that an incorrect assumption on my part?

    Thanks!
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  2. Dinosaur Supervisor KarMa's Avatar
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    I have no trouble when it comes to playing NTSC/PAL/FILM video files. Only really matters anymore if you plan to have it broadcasted on TV, but with telecine or interlacing you can broadcast anything anyway.
    Last edited by KarMa; 14th Feb 2016 at 18:42. Reason: grammar
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  3. Member
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    Only in relation to hardware players.

    With pc there is no issue

    Streaming still has issues what with tvs with built in apps being outdated quickly ... even if you stream your server may still need to convert the signal to a supported format before the display accepts it.
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  4. Even though these video files will always be played from my HDD, I don't plan to watch them on my PC. They will always be streamed to my TV or some other device that will allow me to watch them in other rooms or other locations. This will obviously require some type of "casting" hardware like Google Chrome or a connection to a media server to accomplish this. Then the HDTV will also have to accept whatever video signal I'm feeding it.

    Does that mean I have to ensure I'm only feeding those device specific signals they'll accept? Even if they do accept PAL (which I'm sure they will), would I benefit quality wise to only send a signal that's native to the hardware's region (IE: NTSC)?

    Thanks
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  5. You're asking for a generic answer to a question dependent on specifics -- specific hardware, specific encoding, specific software. Many, if not most TVs and hardware players have a route to play different standard files these days. The best quality for your specific situation depends entirely on your specific situation.
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  6. Member Seeker47's Avatar
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    I get a lot of PAL stuff that is not available here. Occasionally it goes to disc via AVStoDVD, or (much less often) ConvertXtoDVD. In the course of doing that, I would have the option to convert it to NTSC, but seldom do. In most cases though these days I skip the disc step entirely, simply playing the files from a portable HDD attached to a WD TV Live (2nd. Gen.) streaming / player box directly into the tv. These PAL items play just fine. I have to assume that the WD device is finessing the formats and standards -- whatever needs to be done. In any case it works, and works well.

    There are various other streaming / player boxes still on the market -- the WD Live Gen. 2 is mostly not, other than used on eBay -- but I can't vouch for what they do or how well. I'm guessing you'd get very similar results using an HTPC with appropriate software.
    Last edited by Seeker47; 16th Feb 2016 at 01:11.
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