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  1. As some of you already know, I am trying my hardest to author a BDMV in DVDA. I am super close and thanks for all the help so far. The last thing that I can't seem to figure out is why DVDA won't accept the video for the animated menu. As you can see from the screen shot below, it accepts the video for the Play All and Credits Roll, but not the Menu, even though I encoded them all with the exact same x264 command.

    Code:
    x264 --bitrate 27500 --preset veryslow --tune film --bluray-compat --vbv-maxrate 28000 --vbv-bufsize 27500 --level 4.1 --keyint 60 --open-gop --slices 4 --colorprim "bt709" --transfer "bt709" --colormatrix "bt709" --sar 1:1 --pass 1 -o out.264 in.avs
    x264 --bitrate 27500 --preset veryslow --tune film --bluray-compat --vbv-maxrate 28000 --vbv-bufsize 27500 --level 4.1 --keyint 60 --open-gop --slices 4 --colorprim "bt709" --transfer "bt709" --colormatrix "bt709" --sar 1:1 --pass 2 -o out.264 in.avs
    I understand it is only a menu, but it is a heavily composited menu with a lot of keyframed effects, and when I let DVDA encode it, DVDA does a really bad job. So I pulled the m2ts from the test BD-RE to compare DVDA's encode with my encode and below are the differences. But from what I can see, there really aren't any differences. Does anyone have any insight as to why DVDA won't accept my encode? Thanks as always.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	DVDA.png
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ID:	34764

    My raw .264 encode
    Code:
    General
    Complete name               : E:\MainMenu.264
    Format                      : AVC
    Format/Info                 : Advanced Video Codec
    File size                   : 154 MiB
    Overall bit rate mode       : Variable
    Writing library             : x264 core 146 r2538 121396c
    Encoding settings           : cabac=1 / ref=6 / deblock=1:-1:-1 / analyse=0x3:0x133 /
       me=umh / subme=10 / psy=1 / psy_rd=1.00:0.15 / mixed_ref=1 /
       me_range=24 / chroma_me=1 / trellis=2 / 8x8dct=1 / cqm=0 /
       deadzone=21,11 / fast_pskip=1 / chroma_qp_offset=-3 /
       threads=8 / lookahead_threads=1 / sliced_threads=0 / slices=4 /
       nr=0 / decimate=1 / interlaced=0 / bluray_compat=1 /
       constrained_intra=0 / bframes=3 / b_pyramid=1 / b_adapt=2 /
       b_bias=0 / direct=3 / weightb=1 / open_gop=1 / weightp=1 /
       keyint=60 / keyint_min=1 / scenecut=40 / intra_refresh=0 /
       rc_lookahead=60 / rc=2pass / mbtree=1 / bitrate=27500 /
       ratetol=1.0 / qcomp=0.60 / qpmin=0 / qpmax=69 / qpstep=4 /
       cplxblur=20.0 / qblur=0.5 / vbv_maxrate=28000 / vbv_bufsize=27500 /
       nal_hrd=vbr / filler=0 / ip_ratio=1.40 / aq=1:1.00
    
    Video
    Format                      : AVC
    Format/Info                 : Advanced Video Codec
    Format profile              : High@L4.1
    Format settings, CABAC      : Yes
    Format settings, ReFrames   : 5 frames
    Bit rate mode               : Variable
    Bit rate                    : 27.5 Mbps
    Maximum bit rate            : 28.0 Mbps
    Width                       : 1 280 pixels
    Height                      : 720 pixels
    Display aspect ratio        : 16:9
    Frame rate                  : 59.940 fps
    Color space                 : YUV
    Chroma subsampling          : 4:2:0
    Bit depth                   : 8 bits
    Scan type                   : Progressive
    Bits/(Pixel*Frame)          : 0.498
    Writing library             : x264 core 146 r2538 121396c
    Encoding settings           : cabac=1 / ref=6 / deblock=1:-1:-1 / analyse=0x3:0x133 /
       me=umh / subme=10 / psy=1 / psy_rd=1.00:0.15 / mixed_ref=1 /
       me_range=24 / chroma_me=1 / trellis=2 / 8x8dct=1 / cqm=0 /
       deadzone=21,11 / fast_pskip=1 / chroma_qp_offset=-3 /
       threads=8 / lookahead_threads=1 / sliced_threads=0 / slices=4 /
       nr=0 / decimate=1 / interlaced=0 / bluray_compat=1 /
       constrained_intra=0 / bframes=3 / b_pyramid=1 / b_adapt=2 /
       b_bias=0 / direct=3 / weightb=1 / open_gop=1 / weightp=1 /
       keyint=60 / keyint_min=1 / scenecut=40 / intra_refresh=0 /
       rc_lookahead=60 / rc=2pass / mbtree=1 / bitrate=27500 /
       ratetol=1.0 / qcomp=0.60 / qpmin=0 / qpmax=69 / qpstep=4 /
       cplxblur=20.0 / qblur=0.5 / vbv_maxrate=28000 /
       vbv_bufsize=27500 / nal_hrd=vbr / filler=0 / ip_ratio=1.40 / aq=1:1.00
    Color range                 : Limited
    Color primaries             : BT.709
    Transfer characteristics    : BT.709
    Matrix coefficients         : BT.709
    DVDA's encode
    Code:
    General
    ID                          : 0 (0x0)
    Complete name               : G:\BDMV\STREAM\00000.m2ts
    Format                      : BDAV
    Format/Info                 : Blu-ray Video
    File size                   : 183 MiB
    Duration                    : 47s 880ms
    Overall bit rate mode       : Variable
    Overall bit rate            : 32.0 Mbps
    Maximum Overall bit rate    : 48.0 Mbps
    
    Video
    ID                          : 4113 (0x1011)
    Menu ID                     : 1 (0x1)
    Format                      : AVC
    Format/Info                 : Advanced Video Codec
    Format profile              : Main@L4.1
    Format settings, CABAC      : Yes
    Format settings, ReFrames   : 2 frames
    Codec ID                    : 27
    Duration                    : 47s 881ms
    Bit rate mode               : Variable
    Bit rate                    : 29.2 Mbps
    Maximum bit rate            : 40.0 Mbps
    Width                       : 1 280 pixels
    Height                      : 720 pixels
    Display aspect ratio        : 16:9
    Frame rate                  : 59.940 fps
    Color space                 : YUV
    Chroma subsampling          : 4:2:0
    Bit depth                   : 8 bits
    Scan type                   : Progressive
    Bits/(Pixel*Frame)          : 0.528
    Stream size                 : 166 MiB (91%)
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  2. Member
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    I believe the BD/h264/AVC specs restrict the bitrate for 60-frame (2 second) GOPs. Your "raw" .264 (did you really mean "raw"?) encode exceeds the bitrate spec for a 2-second GOP at 1280x720/59.940 progressive. Apparently DVDA gave your desired bitrate priority and encoded at smaller GOP's. http://forum.doom9.org/showthread.php?t=154533
    - My sister Ann's brother
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  3. After closer inspection, I did notice that my encode is High@L4.1 while DVDA uses Main@L4.1. Therefore, I modified my x264 command by adding --profile main. However, that still triggers the transcode flag in DVDA. Then, I noticed that DVDA has only 2 reference frames while mine has 5. Therefore, I tried adding --ref 2 to my command, but it still came out with 3 ref frames, not 2. Anyway, that still didn't help.

    I am running out of ideas fast. And, yes, when DVDA says it needs to be re-encoded, it means business. Could this just be a quirk in DVDA?
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  4. Ahh, gonna try --keyint 30, Be right back. Thanks.
    Last edited by SameSelf; 9th Dec 2015 at 20:18.
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  5. Originally Posted by LMotlow View Post
    I believe the BD/h264/AVC specs restrict the bitrate for 60-frame (2 second) GOPs. Your "raw" .264 (did you really mean "raw"?) encode exceeds the bitrate spec for a 2-second GOP at 1280x720/59.940 progressive. Apparently DVDA gave your desired bitrate priority and encoded at smaller GOP's. http://forum.doom9.org/showthread.php?t=154533
    OK, I tried a couple of things. First, setting --keyint to 30 vs 60. That didn't help. Then I set the bitrate to 15000 and changed the buffer from to 15000 and the maxrate to 30000. Still kicking off the flag. Here is my current x264 command:

    Code:
    x264 --bitrate 15000 --preset veryslow --tune film --bluray-compat --vbv-maxrate 15000 --vbv-bufsize 30000 --profile main --level 4.1 --ref 2 --keyint 30 --open-gop --slices 4 --colorprim "bt709" --transfer "bt709" --colormatrix "bt709" --sar 1:1 --pass 1 -o out.264 in.avs
    x264 --bitrate 15000 --preset veryslow --tune film --bluray-compat --vbv-maxrate 15000 --vbv-bufsize 30000 --profile main --level 4.1 --ref 2 --keyint 30 --open-gop --slices 4 --colorprim "bt709" --transfer "bt709" --colormatrix "bt709" --sar 1:1 --pass 2 -o out.264 in.avs
    Perhaps I am screwing something up related to the GOP length? Any other suggestions? Thanks so much.
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  6. For 720p60 --keyint 60 is already equal to 1 second, thus should not need to be reduced. High profile should be fine for BluRay, as should x264's default ref setting (for 720p and 1080p). --vbv-bufsize must never be greater than --vbv-maxrate, though.

    Is the framerate of the script 100% correct? If in doubt add --fps 60000/1001.
    If it still fails it's probably a bug in DVDA. In that case try to contact their support or play a bit with the parameters (vbv/bitrate?) until something sticks.
    Last edited by sneaker; 9th Dec 2015 at 20:36.
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  7. out of desparation, try :
    Code:
    x264 --crf 14 --preset veryslow --tune film --bluray-compat --vbv-maxrate 15000 --vbv-bufsize 15000 --profile main --level 4.1 --ref 2 --keyint 30 --open-gop --slices 4 --colorprim "bt709" --transfer "bt709" --colormatrix "bt709" --sar 1:1 -o out.264 in.avs
    that should generate stream with steady bitrate, only fluctuating around around 15000kbps, kind of close or to simulate CBR (it is just a menu anyway) DVD Architect could have some problems in earlier versions if bitrate was up and down, unstable, and with menu that could be the case, and if it works , you can try to increase that bitrate and possibly lower that CRF
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  8. Originally Posted by sneaker View Post
    For 720p60 --keyint 60 is already equal to 1 second, thus should not need to be reduced. High profile should be fine for BluRay, as should x264's default ref setting (for 720p and 1080p). --vbv-bufsize must never be greater than --vbv-maxrate, though.

    Is the framerate of the script 100% correct? If in doubt add --fps 60000/1001.
    If it still fails it's probably a bug in DVDA. In that case try to contact their support or play a bit with the parameters (vbv/bitrate?) until something sticks.
    Doh! Somehow got --vbv-bufsize and --vbv-maxrate screwed up. Such a n00b mistake. Thanks fixed that.

    As for the framerate, according to x264's output window it reports: avs [info]: 1280x720p 1:1 @ 60000/1001 fps (cfr). So I don't think that is the problem. But I will probably give it a try anyhow. Thanks.
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  9. Member
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    Originally Posted by sneaker View Post
    For 720p60 --keyint 60 is already equal to 1 second, thus should not need to be reduced. High profile should be fine for BluRay, as should x264's default ref setting (for 720p and 1080p). --vbv-bufsize must never be greater than --vbv-maxrate, though.
    Yep, thanks for catching that (I still can't get 1080p out of my head tonight!).
    - My sister Ann's brother
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  10. Thanks for all the suggestions everyone. Sincerely. I have tried everyone of them and still no dice. I am beginning to think it must be a bug within DVDA. I may try their help desk, just not sure if they will answer given that I am in trial mode. I may fiddle around some more later, but I am finished for the night. Arrrgh!
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  11. Member
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    The post-VPro 10 webinar notes article is not on the SCS site any more, but it included the following note.

    Q. Why does DVD Architect recompress to finalize the menu in a Blu-ray disc? How can recompression be avoided when burning a BD-R with a menu?

    A. All of the objects that make up the menu have to be combined into a single file. This includes all of the background, button, text, and other graphical elements. This cannot be avoided.

    )link

    (If you click the + (Recompress) in the Optimize Disc dialog, does it give you "reasons for required recompression"?)
    Last edited by vkmast; 10th Dec 2015 at 04:38.
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  12. oh, that makes sense, good reminder!, we all forgot about that ,... , that is valid for DVD, unless there is subpicture imported and applied - like in DVD (SCenarist, DVD Lab Pro) , not sure if that is possible to do in DVD Architect, but again that goes for DVD menu, how about Blu-Ray? Is java used to overlay objects or does it work the same way like in DVD menu creation?
    Last edited by _Al_; 10th Dec 2015 at 08:28.
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  13. Originally Posted by vkmast View Post
    The post-VPro 10 webinar notes article is not on the SCS site any more, but it included the following note.

    Q. Why does DVD Architect recompress to finalize the menu in a Blu-ray disc? How can recompression be avoided when burning a BD-R with a menu?

    A. All of the objects that make up the menu have to be combined into a single file. This includes all of the background, button, text, and other graphical elements. This cannot be avoided.

    )link

    (If you click the + (Recompress) in the Optimize Disc dialog, does it give you "reasons for required recompression"?)
    Brilliant! Of course! Why didn't I realize that?? While I drop my video into the menu, I also have several "elements" that allow the viewer to pick and I keyframed those elements to fly in just before the loop point. I should have guessed that they would need to be encoded.

    Thank you so much for pointing that out. I can breathe easier now.

    Now I just need to drop the lossless version of the video into the menu to avoid generational losses. The only problem is the AVI is 1920x1080p29.97. So I guess I need to push it through the Avisynth script at a minimum and rewrite out the AVI. The Avisynth script merely doubles the frame rate to 59.94 and downrezes to 1280x720. Who knows what kind of resizer DVDA uses. I am guessing I can use ffmpeg to re-write out the Lagarith AVI? Something along the lines of:

    Code:
    ffmpeg -i in.avs -c copy out.avi
    Or maybe vdub would be better. Just asking, thanks.
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  14. It is not about resizer that much but de-interlacer, are you using QTGMC in Avisynth? Resizing of progressive footage - there is nothing much to break too much, but you have interlaced footage, so perhaps Avisynth and QTGMC would do better job. That DVD Architect perhaps would not look that bad as resizing interlace footage again to interlace but anyway, I'd use Avisynth and QTGMC (not yadif because it is short clip anyway).
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  15. All my masters are native progressive. The reason I am doubling the frame rate to 59.94 is not because my footage is 30i but because 30p is not BD compliant. So I have no choice but to double the frame rate.
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  16. ok, Architect perhaps uses bilinear or bicubic, where while downsizing it is actually not that bad, as oppose for upscaling...., in Avisynth you can choose whatever you want, there is more resize filters available.
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