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  1. Right now it looks like my original files will be in the Lagarith/UT video codec within an AVI container and .m2ts format.

    I've looked into Video Redo but it doesn't appear to support the formats. If I used the lossless codec within AVI I would probably need the option to output to .m2ts to avoid unnecessary conversions as I am wanting to burn to bluray. If I use the .m2ts it will be after i have converted it to that from the original lossless file.

    Is there anything out there that meets the criteria? How is AVS Video Editor? I tried Free Video Editor (with the premium upgrade) to output in the same format it was imported into but it seemed to be very tedious and rather time consuming even for a video of about 45 minutes to an hour.

    I would really appreciate good suggestions for this newbie. Thanks!
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  2. Use VirtualDub in Video -> Direct Stream Copy mode to edit your Lagarith/UT AVI files. The output will be AVI and there will be no loss of quality. Convert to h.264 in m2ts later.

    Even if you re-encode with lossless codecs there will be no loss of quality -- that's why they're called lossless. But re-encoding will be a waste of time.
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  3. How are you eventually re-encoding the lossless file?
    Another way to do it would be to create and Avisynth script for re-encoding and adding the edits to the script, so in the end you're only re-encoding just the bits you want to keep.

    MeGUI has an AVS Cutter under the Tools menu. You'd open a video (File/Open menu), index it, then use the Script Creator to create the script (applying cropping or resizing etc as required). When you're done you'd save the script, then open it with the AVS Cutter. It allows you to set multiple "cuts" using a preview. When you've finished, save the cuts to the script and encode it.

    The AVS Cutter will also save a "cuts file". It can be loaded into the audio section to ensure the audio is re-encoded to match the video, or there's an audio cutter under the Tools menu that'll use the same cuts file to cut existing audio without re-encoding.

    MeGUI won't output m2ts files but you can encode the video and audio individually then use the m2ts muxer under the Tools menu to mux them into a m2ts file.

    Of course there's nothing wrong with doing it the way jagabo suggested. VirtualDub and MeGUI's AVS cutter are very similar to use for simple editing. I've used both methods on many occasions.
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  4. [QUOTE=hello_hello;2421820]How are you eventually re-encoding the lossless file?

    If I edit from the lossless AVI Lagarith/UT file I want to convert it to .m2ts for burning onto a bluray disc (I'm trying to limit the file to just 1 conversion in hopes to retain the best quality). I think I also mentioned burning from the .m2ts file as well in case there was a tool for those type of files that allows output in the same format (thus being ready to burn). All I know is I don't think Free Video Editor is going to work for me as it took me like 45 minutes or so to try to edit a 1 hour recording. That's why I am wanting something quicker and easier to use and asked about the AVS Video Editor because it looked like it has a "detect scenes" option that I wondered if it made the job quick and easy. But, I know nothing about the program.

    I appreciate all the suggestions thus far here (and await anything others can think of that will meet what I am looking for) and look forward to taking a look at them when I am home later (unfortunately at work the web filter blocks any links to any programs that can be donwloaded).

    I am also trying to figure out if Video Redo would actually accept an .m2ts file (because the automatic "commercial removal/ad detective" would be nice if it actually worked right). I could be wrong, but it looks like the program should accept .m2ts files. But, when I downloaded the trial last night and tried to open an .m2ts file the file didn't show up as an option to choose in the directory I have it. Not sure if that is due to the trial being limited to 15 minutes or not though...
    Last edited by mulliganman; 2nd Dec 2015 at 12:20.
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  5. Member PuzZLeR's Avatar
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    Forget ad detection-ware. Lame and unreliable, or very slow and slightly less unreliable (and still lame). It's faster manually with the right tools after some practice (and likely more accurate).

    As was suggested, and agreed to, VirtualDub and Direct stream mode is the way to go on this one. You can add some filters if you want to apply some crossfades, etc. Then, when done here, that's when you encode to the desired deliverable format, such as M2TS/blu-ray in your case.
    I hate VHS. I always did.
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    There is No quick and easy way to remove commercials
    Video redo..is one of the best, I only use the commercial finder to mark likely spots
    Then manually go through the video recording changing and resetting the markers
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  7. Originally Posted by PuzZLeR View Post
    Forget ad detection-ware. Lame and unreliable, or very slow and slightly less unreliable (and still lame). It's faster manually with the right tools after some practice (and likely more accurate).

    As was suggested, and agreed to, VirtualDub and Direct stream mode is the way to go on this one. You can add some filters if you want to apply some crossfades, etc. Then, when done here, that's when you encode to the desired deliverable format, such as M2TS/blu-ray in your case.
    Thank you so much for this recommendation on Virtual Dub! I feel it SO much better than Free Video Editor. I like how you choose the parts you want to keep instead of the parts to take out! It's also hard for me to imagine VideoRedo or anything else being better. But, I have a couple of questions about it for you.

    I looked back this morning at my "joining" of the edits and it appears I included two copies of the video into the final edited version. Do you have any idea what I may have done wrong? I figure it is some sort of newbie mistake with the software so I am hoping a more experienced user like yourself could help with this.

    My other question is about the video itself. Playing it back and looking at the video in Video Dub does not show black bars on the sides. But, playback in VLC does. So, how can I know if my video actually has the bars and what do I need to do to get rid of them (I obviously don't want them if burning to bluray). Thanks again for all your help so far!
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  8. Originally Posted by mulliganman View Post
    My other question is about the video itself. Playing it back and looking at the video in Video Dub does not show black bars on the sides. But, playback in VLC does. So, how can I know if my video actually has the bars and what do I need to do to get rid of them (I obviously don't want them if burning to bluray). Thanks again for all your help so far!
    By default VirtualDub shows you pixel-for-pixel what's in the video file. If the video has black borders you will see them in VirtualDub's input pane. It does not correct for aspect ratio. VLC will play the video at the correct aspect ratio (assuming it's flagged correctly). If playing full screen you will get letterbox or pillarbox bars if the video's display aspect ratio doesn't match the screen's aspect ratio. Lagarith/UT in AVI do not flag aspect ratios. Most program that open such files will assume square pixel. It's up to you to manually specify the correct aspect ratio.
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  9. Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Originally Posted by mulliganman View Post
    My other question is about the video itself. Playing it back and looking at the video in Video Dub does not show black bars on the sides. But, playback in VLC does. So, how can I know if my video actually has the bars and what do I need to do to get rid of them (I obviously don't want them if burning to bluray). Thanks again for all your help so far!
    By default VirtualDub shows you pixel-for-pixel what's in the video file. If the video has black borders you will see them in VirtualDub's input pane. It does not correct for aspect ratio. VLC will play the video at the correct aspect ratio (assuming it's flagged correctly). If playing full screen you will get letterbox or pillarbox bars if the video's display aspect ratio doesn't match the screen's aspect ratio. Lagarith/UT in AVI do not flag aspect ratios. Most program that open such files will assume square pixel. It's up to you to manually specify the correct aspect ratio.
    O.K. So I did not see black bars in Video Dub. But, I did in VLC but I did not have VLC screen open as large as it could be for playback. I guess I need help determining if I need to specify to the correct aspect ratio. How do I do this and is this something I would do prior to converting to .m2ts for bluray burning or a setting I need to choose when converting to .m2ts?

    Do you know why I might have ending up with what looks to be 2 copies of the video using Video Dub?
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  10. Dinosaur Supervisor KarMa's Avatar
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    Videoredo would be my pick for a job like this, if you were dealing with MPEG2 or H.264 broadcasts. But since you are dealing with lossless/AVI then I would stick with VDub.
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  11. Originally Posted by mulliganman View Post
    I guess I need help determining if I need to specify to the correct aspect ratio. How do I do this and is this something I would do prior to converting to .m2ts for bluray burning or a setting I need to choose when converting to .m2ts?
    First, identify your source's display aspect ratio. For example, DVDs only come in two aspect ratios: 4:3 and 16:9 (both use the same frame size). or standard definition analog video capture is usually 4:3. Then resize to a frame size that matches that aspect ratio (640x480, for example), or keep the frame size and tell your encoder what the source's aspect ratio is so it flags it correctly.

    Originally Posted by mulliganman View Post
    Do you know why I might have ending up with what looks to be 2 copies of the video using Video Dub?
    That's usually because someone use File -> Open Video File, then File -> Append AVI Segment. Or you copied and pasted within VirtualDub.
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  12. Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Originally Posted by mulliganman View Post
    I guess I need help determining if I need to specify to the correct aspect ratio. How do I do this and is this something I would do prior to converting to .m2ts for bluray burning or a setting I need to choose when converting to .m2ts?
    First, identify your source's display aspect ratio. For example, DVDs only come in two aspect ratios: 4:3 and 16:9 (both use the same frame size). or standard definition analog video capture is usually 4:3. Then resize to a frame size that matches that aspect ratio (640x480, for example), or keep the frame size and tell your encoder what the source's aspect ratio is so it flags it correctly.

    Originally Posted by mulliganman View Post
    Do you know why I might have ending up with what looks to be 2 copies of the video using Video Dub?
    That's usually because someone use File -> Open Video File, then File -> Append AVI Segment. Or you copied and pasted within VirtualDub.
    So you are saying when I convert to .m2ts format (so that I can burn to bluray) that I should make sure whatever program I am using chooses 16:9 or 4:3 on the aspect ratio prior to converting? Is one better than the other for viewing playback on a bluray disc?

    The File > Open Video File > File > Append AVI Segment is EXACTLY WHAT I DID! But I thought the guide on joining said to open the first cut up that way and then add the following cuts with File > Append AVI Segment Was it suppose to be just adding all cuts with File> Append AVI Segment then?
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  13. If your source is a single file all you need to do is File -> Open Video File. If your source is multiple AVI files that you want to join together you use File -> Open Video File to open the first, the File -> Append AVI Segment to add each of the additional files. If your AVI file names are number sequentially you only have to append the first one, the rest are automatically appended. So if you have:

    FILE0001.AVI
    FILE0002.AVI
    FILE0003.AVI
    FILE0004.AVI

    Open FILE0001.AVI, then Append FILE0002.AVI. FILE0003.AVI and FILE0004.AVI will be be appended automatically along with FILE00002.AVI.

    If the video isn't square pixel you need to tell your encoder what the correct aspect ratio of the source is. Either the display aspect ratio (the final shape of the picture) or the sampling aspect ratio (AKA pixel aspect ratio) the relative spacing between pixels. This not the same as the aspect ratio of the Blu-ray disc you're making. If your source isn't 16:9 it's not supposed to fill a 16:9 screen. It should have letterbox or pillarbox bars when displayed.
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  14. Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    If your source is a single file all you need to do is File -> Open Video File. If your source is multiple AVI files that you want to join together you use File -> Open Video File to open the first, the File -> Append AVI Segment to add each of the additional files. If your AVI file names are number sequentially you only have to append the first one, the rest are automatically appended. So if you have:

    FILE0001.AVI
    FILE0002.AVI
    FILE0003.AVI
    FILE0004.AVI

    Open FILE0001.AVI, then Append FILE0002.AVI. FILE0003.AVI and FILE0004.AVI will be be appended automatically along with FILE00002.AVI.

    If the video isn't square pixel you need to tell your encoder what the correct aspect ratio of the source is. Either the display aspect ratio (the final shape of the picture) or the sampling aspect ratio (AKA pixel aspect ratio) the relative spacing between pixels. This not the same as the aspect ratio of the Blu-ray disc you're making. If your source isn't 16:9 it's not supposed to fill a 16:9 screen. It should have letterbox or pillarbox bars when displayed.
    Well the original file was then split for editing so I ended up with about 5 files yes. I chose File > Open Video File to put the first one in. Then I did File > Append AVI Segment to add the second file. Then I did File > Append AVI Segment to add the third file. Then I did File > Append AVI Segment to add the fourth file and so on to all parts I wanted to keep from the original were back together. Instead of the variation on the names you had I called them FILE.AVI, FILE p1.avi, FILE p.2.avi, FILE p.3.avi, FILE p.4.avi, and FILE p.5.avi

    Given that information what was the proper sequence to add back together?
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  15. I'm not sure if AviSynth will automatically recognize those file names as sequential. Just try it and find out.
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  16. Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    I'm not sure if AviSynth will automatically recognize those file names as sequential. Just try it and find out.
    I'll just rename them all as FILE0001.avi, FILE0002.avi, FILE0003.avi, FILE0004.avi, FILE005.avi, and FILE006.avi as you suggested and then do

    File > Open FILE0001.AVI, then Append FILE0002.AVI. FILE0003.AVI and FILE0004.AVI, FILE005.avi, FILE0006.avi and see if that works and report back.
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  17. Member PuzZLeR's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by mulliganman
    I looked back this morning at my "joining" of the edits and it appears I included two copies of the video into the final edited version. Do you have any idea what I may have done wrong? I figure it is some sort of newbie mistake with the software so I am hoping a more experienced user like yourself could help with this.
    Some explanations followed before I was able to get back to this thread.

    But perhaps, this can also help. Look at the arrow.

    Click image for larger version

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    I hate VHS. I always did.
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  18. Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Originally Posted by mulliganman View Post
    I guess I need help determining if I need to specify to the correct aspect ratio. How do I do this and is this something I would do prior to converting to .m2ts for bluray burning or a setting I need to choose when converting to .m2ts?
    First, identify your source's display aspect ratio. For example, DVDs only come in two aspect ratios: 4:3 and 16:9 (both use the same frame size). or standard definition analog video capture is usually 4:3. Then resize to a frame size that matches that aspect ratio (640x480, for example), or keep the frame size and tell your encoder what the source's aspect ratio is so it flags it correctly.

    Originally Posted by mulliganman View Post
    Do you know why I might have ending up with what looks to be 2 copies of the video using Video Dub?
    That's usually because someone use File -> Open Video File, then File -> Append AVI Segment. Or you copied and pasted within VirtualDub.
    Updating here. My original video/file i edited again with Virtual Dub and renamed the parts File 0001, File 0002, File 0003, etc. Did File > open File 0001. Then File > Append and chose File 0002 making sure autodetect was checked. But for whatever reason it only picked up File 0001 and File 0002 for the rejoining. I got it to work though by File > Open File 0001. Then File > Append AVI for each additional file with autodetect unchecked and that finally worked. Thanks to all who contributed.

    Just one more thing I still need help with from here. Now that I know how to edit back the video using VirtualDub I need to make sure what I get on bluray does not have black bars. So my next planned steps include converting edited AVI files to .m2ts using either Video to Video Converter or something else if there is a better option. After they are in .m2ts I am going to try to use multiAVCHD to create a menu for the videos that can fit together on a disc. The saved project with the file will be burned with IMG Burn. Where do I need to ensure the videos are in the proper frame size or whatever to make sure I don't have black bars on the finished product? Can anyone please share with specific steps/links to the appropriate guide much like puzzler did with the "autodetect" image?
    Last edited by mulliganman; 4th Dec 2015 at 14:46. Reason: removed Freemake since it doesn't support .m2ts conversion
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  19. O.K. It looks likes the frame height/width was 1600 x 900. Does this help at all?
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  20. All you have to do is enlarge the frame to 1920x1080, the standard Blu-ray frame size. The editor should be able to do that for you.
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  21. Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    All you have to do is enlarge the frame to 1920x1080, the standard Blu-ray frame size. The editor should be able to do that for you.
    I am hoping you meant converter (like Video to Video Converter) since I have already edited and put some other videos back together with Virtual Dub..
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  22. Editor, converter, whatever you want to call it. If it knows how to make Blu-ray compatible video it should be able to resize your source.
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  23. Is there something similar to Virtual Dub that works with WMV files for possibly direct stream method or outputting to bluray/.m2ts format?
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