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  1. Member
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    I did a quick search here, but most threads seem to be about converting with an older Sony DV camcorder with pass through.

    I've got a couple of shoeboxes full of tapes, some were taken with one of the first sony 8mm camcorders, some with a hi-8 later on. I already converted a few by simply running rca cables from the old camcorder to rca inputs on my DVD recorder, and simultaneously pressing record and play on the units. The result was OK, but I want to know if there is a better way.

    I have also since misplaced the old hi-8 camcorder, I have a newer one someone gave me, but it has no AC power supply back for it. It is not a DV camcorder.

    Right now I'm considering my options:
    • purchase an AC adapter for the existing camcorder & just continue to record direct to DVD
    • look for a used Sony DV camcorder with pass through & either record to DVD with it or to my PC
    • look for a used Sony 8mm deck & record to DVD directly.
    Did Sony make an 8mm deck with digital pass through? A quick ebay search turned up many different decks, however few details were provided.

    Am I going to get better end results with DPT? Or should I just go the cheapest route and get an AC adapter for the analog camcorder and record direct to DVD?

    thanks in advance
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  2. One of the better ways is to use a digital 8 camcorder or deck to play the tapes directly out to DV. Provisos: D8 player must be the same system (PAL or NTSC) as tapes, and sometimes slower speed recordings will not play.

    Avoid realtime encoding to DVD. Convert the captured DV files to DVD compatible MPEG instead. AVStoDVD is an excellent authoring software.
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    Thanks - it's NTSC, afaik all done at the same speed (I thought there was only one)

    I have an external capture device for the PC - it's older than my current PC (5 years old) but I'm assuming it will do the trick since we're not talking HD content here.

    If memory serves I think it is an older Hauppauge WinTV - I also have an internal card on an older PC, but I don't think I have a free slot for it.

    Any particular reason for avoiding real time encoding to DVD? Even if I can't find a used DV camcorder or deck and I better off sending the analog tape to be captured on the PC?
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    Originally Posted by smrpix View Post
    One of the better ways is to use a digital 8 camcorder or deck to play the tapes directly out to DV. Provisos: D8 player must be the same system (PAL or NTSC) as tapes, and sometimes slower speed recordings will not play.

    Avoid realtime encoding to DVD. Convert the captured DV files to DVD compatible MPEG instead. AVStoDVD is an excellent authoring software.
    Nonsense. Send analog tape through two lossy encodes? That's mighty damn silly.

    Play analog 8mm/hi8 with the proper analog camera, directly to a DVD recorder. There's no way you're going to put you time and effort into three or more extra steps on a PC to get garbage output. You can get slightly cleaner garbage going directly to high-bitrate DVD.
    - My sister Ann's brother
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  5. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Not silly. Has been successfully done that way for a decade.

    Yes, there are 2 generations of loss, but you are giving up very little (dv compression @25 mbps is good enough for many types of material and it works well as a realtime codec) for simplicity, efficiency and control in sd editing and for highly optimized 2pass vbr encoding for dvd output.

    Yes, there is an extra colorspace/subsampling conversion, but there are methods that can make that inconsequential.

    Other than that and the filesize/bitrate/capacity requirements (pretty pedestrian these days), there is NO downside.

    Scott
    Last edited by Cornucopia; 23rd Nov 2015 at 20:25.
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  6. Since the D8 camera also acts as a TBC and the initial processing is simply playback through the camera it's not silly at all. If you prefer, feed the DV out from the camera directly into the DVD recorder if it accepts it.
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    Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    Not silly. Has been successfully done that way for a decade.

    Yes, there are 2 generations of loss, but you are giving up very little (dv compression @25 mbps is good enough for many types of material and it works well as a realtime codec) for simplicity, efficiency and control in sd editing and for highly optimized 2pass vbr encoding for dvd output.

    Yes, there is an extra colorspace/subsampling conversion, but there are methods that can make that inconsequential.

    Other than that and the filesize/bitrate/capacity requirements (pretty pedestrian these days), there is NO downside.

    Scott
    Well, then, if the O.P.'s standards and regard for his tapes are as low as yours, he'll be in artifact lover's hog heaven.

    Say, haven't we seen this discussion and several just like it only recently? Maybe, like, three or four of them? Isn't one of them still in the "new post" lists? WTH, another repeat won't hurt I guess. You guys enjoy yourselves.
    - My sister Ann's brother
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  8. .
    I never got a better result — besides playing tapes in the proper device of course (as advised above), i.e. an Hi-8 camcorder in this case —, than:

    — by sending the analog signal via "S-Video", or even "Composite" (yellow) * through a capture card:

    — to "VirtualDub capture option" or any other software that saves to: .avi and compresses using a lossless codec, such as "HuffYUV" [ or even "PicVideo MJPEG" set to its "19" quality, and that's NOT lossless, but close / btw, note that all MJPEG codecs canNOT be trusted... ].

    Every time I tried to encode directly to MPEG-2 DVD format, even at ~9500 kbs, the result was visibly MUCH worse! than recoding LATER (and using at least two passes) to MPEG-2, from the .avi files.

    * "S-Video" vs. "Composite": despite all that I've read — i.e. "Use S-Video if possible of course! " —, I could never SEE any improvement, due to "S-Video", and although sending separate Y & C signals SHOULD make a difference...

    About the capture card the PC should be equipped with, you'll find advice here (other topics cover that). What I observed (several times) is simply: even a gadget USB capture device (if you don't want to add a PCI board) plus the ".avi method", do better — visually —, than trying to encode to MPEG-2 directly, and that, even using fairly good equipment. Note than I'm only mentioning amateur equipment, NOT professional.


    Now, "two shoeboxes full "... probably mean quite a few tapes... So, if you are used to convert directly to DVD (to a standalone DVD recorder), you will probably find "my" method (way) too long and tedious!..

    It all depends on what you aim at: medium if not "medium lousy", OR as good as you can get, quality wise.

    With friends, we compared many results, tests, etc. (dark videos, or bright with a lot of movement + interlaced of course, sometimes deinterlaced in real time ), obtained on the fly via pretty good capture devices, with "my" SLOW method. The step by step method WAS indeniably better — but I insist again on the fact that those friends who encoded to DVD on the fly, got their discs... in real time; while it took me MUCH longer...

    That said, may be one, or you, will prove me wrong, by recommending a piece of equipment — affordable, please — that works both in real time AND very well (on visual quality) : I'd be happy to learn... [ I didn't cite any brand / model, as I'd rather not raise some endless technical argument or debate. ]
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    I have yet to see a DVD-recorder whose MPEG2 encoding rivals the quality of (most) software MPEG2 encoders. With difficult to encode material I can still see plenty not-so-minor artefacts even at XP speed (1 hour per DVD5) with my Panasonic DMR-EH 575, and isn't the Panasonic encoding engine supposed to be better than most competitors?

    I would only use it if I absolutely have to do it in real time (that being said, with a decent CPU you can easily encode MPEG2 faster than real time).
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    thanks for the replies - a couple of things I am still wondering:
    • For any of the above scenarios, am I going to get better results with a DV camcorder with digital pass through?
    • If I decide, because of time constraints, to go the direct to DVD encoding, is the DV pass through still relevant, or am I just as well off with analog camcorder?
    • Are there any of the Sony 8mm decks that offer digital pass through?
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  11. Originally Posted by glen_s View Post
    • For any of the above scenarios, am I going to get better results with a DV camcorder with digital pass through?
    • If I decide, because of time constraints, to go the direct to DVD encoding, is the DV pass through still relevant, or am I just as well off with analog camcorder?
    Completely depends on the quality of the analog playback device.
    Originally Posted by glen_s View Post
    • Are there any of the Sony 8mm decks that offer digital pass through?
    Digital 8 cameras/decks. In which case you don't need passthrough because you can play the tapes directly from the D8 deck or camera.
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  12. Hello glen_s,
    I was in the same situation a while ago, a box of video8 tapes to convert to a digital format.
    (TLDR : use a Digital8 camcorder, edit the DV files, convert to whatever format you need)

    After some research I decided that the better method was to buy a Digital8 camcorder. This will give you synced DV files very easily : pop tape in get digital file out. You will need a firewire 400 card on your PC though.
    Once you have those DV files you can easily edit them and cut any unwanted footage.

    The main advantage of that method over direct to DVD is that those DV files will become your archive. You will be able to preserve them, DVDs will rot within a few years depending on storage environment. Also you will be able to convert those files to any delivery format you might need with no loss of quality, now and 10 years down the line.

    Since those DV files will be interlaced video you might want to look into QTGMC, if you decide to convert to MP4 this will give you a stellar jump in quality.

    Here are my threads, complete noob to decent result
    https://forum.videohelp.com/threads/369719-How-to-edit-DV-avi-files-without-transcoding
    https://forum.videohelp.com/threads/370064-Preserving-anamorphic-aspect-ratio-while-cropping
    https://forum.videohelp.com/threads/371577-Encoding-Video8-with-Megui-and-QTGMC
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    (very) late update - here we are 8 years on and I finally am getting around to converting the rest of my 8mm tapes to digital..(I procrastinate a lot)

    I did copy about 20 of my 8mm analog tapes direct to DVD with my DVD recorder, and finding some more free time lately decided to tackle the rest. Some of the DVD's turned out not too bad, and I just ripped them all with handbrake to disk. There is some noticeable interlacing in some it seems, but I'm not sure if some of that is not just my old eyes.

    I had about 20 or so more tapes to convert, and the Sony TR700 camcorder I have is quirky as all get out (probably the age of the tapes isn't helping) but feeding the signal into a StarTech SVID2USB232 unit and using a video program called OBS Studio seems to be giving a "good enough" result. Some tapes converted surprisingly good, and I plan to try upscaling them a bit with Davinci Resolve when I get time.

    However, I don't know if the camera is going to last after doing about 5 tapes, I have to fiddle with it to get it to rewind tapes that need it, sometimes it only plays for a few seconds until I eject the tape a few times, spin them manually, clean the head & spindles with alcohol etc. - so I am again considering picking up a good condition DCR-TRV350 or similar camera for about $300 if the TR700 bites the dust before I finish them.

    I was going to go with the more expensive Elgato unit over the StarTech, but a couple of reviews I watched actually found the cheaper Startech unit just as good or better for output.

    If the TR700 camera holds out I'll settle for the output I'm getting, if it bites the dust before I'm done thenI'll splurge and pick up a digital 8 camcorder from Ebay, it looks like I could sell it afterwards and get some money back in any case.
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    Originally Posted by glen_s View Post
    (very) late update - here we are 8 years on and I finally am getting around to converting the rest of my 8mm tapes to digital..(I procrastinate a lot)

    I did copy about 20 of my 8mm analog tapes direct to DVD with my DVD recorder, and finding some more free time lately decided to tackle the rest. Some of the DVD's turned out not too bad, and I just ripped them all with handbrake to disk. There is some noticeable interlacing in some it seems, but I'm not sure if some of that is not just my old eyes.

    I had about 20 or so more tapes to convert, and the Sony TR700 camcorder I have is quirky as all get out (probably the age of the tapes isn't helping) but feeding the signal into a StarTech SVID2USB232 unit and using a video program called OBS Studio seems to be giving a "good enough" result. Some tapes converted surprisingly good, and I plan to try upscaling them a bit with Davinci Resolve when I get time.

    However, I don't know if the camera is going to last after doing about 5 tapes, I have to fiddle with it to get it to rewind tapes that need it, sometimes it only plays for a few seconds until I eject the tape a few times, spin them manually, clean the head & spindles with alcohol etc. - so I am again considering picking up a good condition DCR-TRV350 or similar camera for about $300 if the TR700 bites the dust before I finish them.

    I was going to go with the more expensive Elgato unit over the StarTech, but a couple of reviews I watched actually found the cheaper Startech unit just as good or better for output.

    If the TR700 camera holds out I'll settle for the output I'm getting, if it bites the dust before I'm done thenI'll splurge and pick up a digital 8 camcorder from Ebay, it looks like I could sell it afterwards and get some money back in any case.
    Your journey mirrors mine with regard to Video 8 and digital 8 tapes.

    I originally archived my "Shoebox" of tapes onto DVD but as the years went by the media began freezing and getting artefacts with use (world travels and videos of children meant lots of use) I had kept the original tapes as back up and have now digitized once again, this time to digital files with superior results - let me tell you how.

    The following will only be worthwhile if you re-digitize the whole lot due to the fact with you only having 5 left the investment for the following would not be worthwhile.

    How I did it:-
    Sony Handycam DCR-TRV 320
    DV out via (the 320 plays V8 & D8) Firewire to
    Panasonic DMR-EH57 with Firewire in and HDMI out to
    Cloner Alliance Pro (Google it) to
    Memory stick on Cloner Alliance Pro as a digital Mp4 file - no need for a PC (apart from using your monitor (HDMI) as an end point to see what's going on)

    The above does not downgrade your signal because of the process digital DV then HDMI out from the Panasonic to the Cloner AP.
    With regard to that, some devices I own identify files created this way as HD because of the above process.

    The Cloner AP comes with a remote and software which is excellent for any further editing merging or trimming.
    Even though this is a "real time" process you press play on the camera, record on the Cloner AP and come back when the tape is finished.....

    The worst sin a person can do when archiving is firstly to use RCA cables - and secondly to use inferior capture devices - which the Cloner AP is not.

    Keep it digital from Camera right through.
    Last edited by Graay; 22nd Dec 2023 at 15:58.
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    Got my bag of popcorn open. This'll be good!
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  16. Captures & Restoration lollo's Avatar
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    Me too, rare to see such a butchering of a video
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    If Dave "12voltvids" to be believed, the last iteration of Cloner AP preserves aspect ratio, black levels, image rate (25i -> 50p, 30i -> 60p), and correctly generates 59.94p instead of 60.00p. If all of this is true, I don't see why not. I saw samples on his YT channel (which he, unlike his bashers, have provided), and they look quite nice.
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    That may well be true, but practically speaking, one would be editing the capture: getting rid of static/blue screen, cropping, removing glitches, gamma and colour-adjusting, titling, possibly adding a sound track, trimming down, as well as splitting up into meaningful files (I don't sit at my TV scrolling through hour-long home video files looking for something interesting). This will mean re-encoding of an already lowish-quality SD MP4. Not ideal, IMO.
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    Meh. Editing AVC is no big deal, and the source is not a 70-mm original to begin with. Also, YOU may want to edit, but most do not. They won't watch it anyway. They want to digitize it just in case.
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    Originally Posted by Bwaak
    Editing AVC is no big deal, and the source is not a 70-mm original to begin with.
    That's my point. The bigger/better the original, the lesser the perceived quality loss on re-encode. And obviously, VV.
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    Originally Posted by Bwaak View Post
    Meh. Editing AVC is no big deal, and the source is not a 70-mm original to begin with. Also, YOU may want to edit, but most do not. They won't watch it anyway. They want to digitize it just in case.
    The supplied Cloner AP software is excellent and trims & combines with no noticeable loss, making it too easy to split into multiple files.

    My oldest Video 8 tapes are now 35 years old, the Cloner AP (using the process I used) has restored colour to the digital files that when played back, make memories more immersive, like the slightly auburn coloured hair of my then 9 month old daughter; previous conversions did not have that sort of definition.

    I can control the aspect ratio and the record resolution and the hardware is versatile, a great tool.

    To those reading this post - Don't knock it until you try it!
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    @Graay, could you post a short 4:3 clip converted by Cloner AP? Thanks!
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    https://files.videohelp.com/u/308200/Birdy.mp4

    Taken on an analogue Sony Handycam on LP speed 35 years ago converted with Cloner AP using 4:3
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    Originally Posted by Graay View Post
    https://files.videohelp.com/u/308200/Birdy.mp4

    Taken on an analogue Sony Handycam on LP speed 35 years ago converted with Cloner AP using 4:3
    Either @12voltvids was wrong, or he has a better version than yours.
    • You are in NZ, was your source 30 fps? If yes, why 60.00 fps instead of 59.94 fps? If no, why 60.00 fps instead of 50 fps?
    • The 4:3 frame is not stretched to HD frame - good, but @12voltvids said that his unit generates true 4:3 frame - yours does not, it letterboxes 4:3 content inside HD frame.
    • Cropped to 960x720 it shows black areas on the left and on the right, meaning that the box treats the whole 720-wide frame as 4:3, which is generally wrong, only the 704-wide portion has 4:3 proportions, so your picture is teeny-tiny squished horizontally.
    • The good thing: correct video levels, should look ok when uploaded to YouTube. But will suck to watch on a smartphone with vertical orientation, will have black sides.
    Code:
    General
    Complete name                    : Graay - Birdy - Cloner AP.mp4
    Format                           : MPEG-4
    Format profile                   : Base Media
    Codec ID                         : isom
    File size                        : 18.6 MiB
    Duration                         : 14s 883ms
    Overall bit rate                 : 10.5 Mbps
    Writing application              : Lavf58.10.100
    
    Video
    ID                               : 1
    Format                           : AVC
    Format/Info                      : Advanced Video Codec
    Format profile                   : High@L5.1
    Format settings, CABAC           : Yes
    Format settings, ReFrames        : 1 frame
    Codec ID                         : avc1
    Codec ID/Info                    : Advanced Video Coding
    Duration                         : 14s 883ms
    Bit rate mode                    : Variable
    Bit rate                         : 10.2 Mbps
    Width                            : 1 280 pixels
    Height                           : 720 pixels
    Display aspect ratio             : 16:9
    Frame rate mode                  : Variable
    Frame rate                       : 60.001 fps
    Original frame rate              : 60.000 fps
    Minimum frame rate               : 59.001 fps
    Maximum frame rate               : 60.002 fps
    Color space                      : YUV
    Chroma subsampling               : 4:2:0
    Bit depth                        : 8 bits
    Scan type                        : Progressive
    Bits/(Pixel*Frame)               : 0.184
    Stream size                      : 18.0 MiB (97%)
    
    Audio
    ID                               : 2
    Format                           : AAC
    Format/Info                      : Advanced Audio Codec
    Format version                   : Version 4
    Format profile                   : LC
    Format settings, SBR             : No
    Codec ID                         : 40
    Duration                         : 14s 869ms
    Bit rate mode                    : Constant
    Bit rate                         : 288 Kbps
    Channel(s)                       : 2 channels
    Channel positions                : Front: L R
    Sampling rate                    : 48.0 KHz
    Stream size                      : 523 KiB (3%)
    Image Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version

Name:	Birdie histogram.png
Views:	8
Size:	82.3 KB
ID:	75706  

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    Originally Posted by Bwaak
    704-wide portion has 4:3 proportions
    Does that apply to 8mm? I thought that issue (dubious IMO) was only related to captured VHS broadcast video designed for CRTs.

    Overall, birdy looks pretty good to me. I'd crop that gunk off the bottom though.

    Also, as Bwaak points out, the burnt-in black sides bars are unnecessary. They could mess with the TV display but definitely are annoying on a PC and would show up on YT. On a phone in portrait, they will reduce the size of the actual image.
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    Originally Posted by Bwaak View Post
    Originally Posted by Graay View Post
    https://files.videohelp.com/u/308200/Birdy.mp4

    Taken on an analogue Sony Handycam on LP speed 35 years ago converted with Cloner AP using 4:3
    Either @12voltvids was wrong, or he has a better version than yours.
    • You are in NZ, was your source 30 fps? If yes, why 60.00 fps instead of 59.94 fps? If no, why 60.00 fps instead of 50 fps?
    • The 4:3 frame is not stretched to HD frame - good, but @12voltvids said that his unit generates true 4:3 frame - yours does not, it letterboxes 4:3 content inside HD frame.
    • Cropped to 960x720 it shows black areas on the left and on the right, meaning that the box treats the whole 720-wide frame as 4:3, which is generally wrong, only the 704-wide portion has 4:3 proportions, so your picture is teeny-tiny squished horizontally.
    • The good thing: correct video levels, should look ok when uploaded to YouTube. But will suck to watch on a smartphone with vertical orientation, will have black sides.
    Code:
    General
    Complete name                    : Graay - Birdy - Cloner AP.mp4
    Format                           : MPEG-4
    Format profile                   : Base Media
    Codec ID                         : isom
    File size                        : 18.6 MiB
    Duration                         : 14s 883ms
    Overall bit rate                 : 10.5 Mbps
    Writing application              : Lavf58.10.100
    
    Video
    ID                               : 1
    Format                           : AVC
    Format/Info                      : Advanced Video Codec
    Format profile                   : High@L5.1
    Format settings, CABAC           : Yes
    Format settings, ReFrames        : 1 frame
    Codec ID                         : avc1
    Codec ID/Info                    : Advanced Video Coding
    Duration                         : 14s 883ms
    Bit rate mode                    : Variable
    Bit rate                         : 10.2 Mbps
    Width                            : 1 280 pixels
    Height                           : 720 pixels
    Display aspect ratio             : 16:9
    Frame rate mode                  : Variable
    Frame rate                       : 60.001 fps
    Original frame rate              : 60.000 fps
    Minimum frame rate               : 59.001 fps
    Maximum frame rate               : 60.002 fps
    Color space                      : YUV
    Chroma subsampling               : 4:2:0
    Bit depth                        : 8 bits
    Scan type                        : Progressive
    Bits/(Pixel*Frame)               : 0.184
    Stream size                      : 18.0 MiB (97%)
    
    Audio
    ID                               : 2
    Format                           : AAC
    Format/Info                      : Advanced Audio Codec
    Format version                   : Version 4
    Format profile                   : LC
    Format settings, SBR             : No
    Codec ID                         : 40
    Duration                         : 14s 869ms
    Bit rate mode                    : Constant
    Bit rate                         : 288 Kbps
    Channel(s)                       : 2 channels
    Channel positions                : Front: L R
    Sampling rate                    : 48.0 KHz
    Stream size                      : 523 KiB (3%)
    What an expert!

    I am not an expert - just posted here as I thought it might help the OP.

    I obliged to your request for a clip knowing this expert analysis was forthcoming but here I am, still delighted with the captured memories from so long ago, a lot of which were at LP speed & terrible quality, often out of focus on my then, new camera.

    There are plenty of settings on the Cloner AP I just simply select HDMI, 4:3 & 720P (720P is the lowest default). I think it automatically does the 60 frames by default.

    Finally, a rhetorical question, what are you comparing the Cloner AP to (being that all things are relative) we are not talking about a Professional set up here costing thousands?
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    Originally Posted by Graay View Post
    There are plenty of settings on the Cloner AP I just simply select HDMI, 4:3 & 720P (720P is the lowest default). I think it automatically does the 60 frames by default.
    Were you digitizing a PAL tape? The result should be 50p, not 60p. Can you explicitly choose 50 fps rate? Can you choose for the box to match the input rate?

    Originally Posted by Graay View Post
    Finally, a rhetorical question, what are you comparing the Cloner AP to (being that all things are relative) we are not talking about a Professional set up here costing thousands?
    Since it is a rhetorical question, I don't need to answer... but I will. I am not comparing it to anything. I am noting some peculiarities, which Cloner Alliance could have addressed long ago to make it a better device, and maybe it did, you just have an older device.

    For $180 in the U.S. I don't feel like experimenting myself, hence I am asking others for their experience. I already have a similar box, which I bought a while ago for about $60 (on sale for $30 now, frankly I think it's a bargain despite the limitations), feel free to watch a review on YouTube. I would not mind getting a better one if it has the issues addressed. But looking at your file, yours does not seem to do better unless you made a mistake configuring it. Actually, it does: black level is correct.

    If there are indeed a plenty of settings, can you specify output frame rate, like 50 fps? Can you force it to generate true 4:3 frame, like 960x720 or 1440x1080 (with square pixels), or is it always 16:9? Broadcast HD must be 16:9, so if your content has different proportions, it must be contained within a 16:9 frame with some black bars. But this is broadcast, if you make files for watching on a computer or uploading to youtube, you can have any aspect ratio you want.

    So, can you check the frame size and frame rate options, please? Much obliged! And thanks for the sample!
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    Originally Posted by Bwaak View Post
    Originally Posted by Graay View Post
    There are plenty of settings on the Cloner AP I just simply select HDMI, 4:3 & 720P (720P is the lowest default). I think it automatically does the 60 frames by default.
    Were you digitizing a PAL tape? The result should be 50p, not 60p. Can you explicitly choose 50 fps rate? Can you choose for the box to match the input rate?

    Originally Posted by Graay View Post
    Finally, a rhetorical question, what are you comparing the Cloner AP to (being that all things are relative) we are not talking about a Professional set up here costing thousands?
    Since it is a rhetorical question, I don't need to answer... but I will. I am not comparing it to anything. I am noting some peculiarities, which Cloner Alliance could have addressed long ago to make it a better device, and maybe it did, you just have an older device.

    For $180 in the U.S. I don't feel like experimenting myself, hence I am asking others for their experience. I already have a similar box, which I bought a while ago for about $60 (on sale for $30 now, frankly I think it's a bargain despite the limitations), feel free to watch a review on YouTube. I would not mind getting a better one if it has the issues addressed. But looking at your file, yours does not seem to do better unless you made a mistake configuring it. Actually, it does: black level is correct.

    If there are indeed a plenty of settings, can you specify output frame rate, like 50 fps? Can you force it to generate true 4:3 frame, like 960x720 or 1440x1080 (with square pixels), or is it always 16:9? Broadcast HD must be 16:9, so if your content has different proportions, it must be contained within a 16:9 frame with some black bars. But this is broadcast, if you make files for watching on a computer or uploading to you tube, you can have any aspect ratio you want.

    So, can you check the frame size and frame rate options, please? Much obliged! And thanks for the sample!
    From the manual:- "MP4(H.264encoding) for video and AAC for audio, in either1080p@60fps or 720p@60fps. If capturing videos to PC, there are more resolution and audio code captions available".

    I use the quick and easy direct to the Cloner AP unit for capture without using the computer, directly to memory stick, but it appears there are more settings for FPS when using their extra Cloner "Helper" software.

    Christmas Eve here now so signing off for now - Merry Christmas to all - where ever you are!
    Image Attached Thumbnails ca-998p_user_manual.pdf  

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  29. Captures & Restoration lollo's Avatar
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    If I am not wrong you are talking about nothing, because in the workflow the A/D conversion is not done by the Cloner AP device, but by the camera:

    Sony Handycam DCR-TRV 320
    DV out via (the 320 plays V8 & D8) Firewire to
    Panasonic DMR-EH57 with Firewire in and HDMI out to
    Cloner Alliance Pro (Google it) to
    Memory stick on Cloner Alliance Pro as a digital Mp4 file - no need for a PC (apart from using your monitor (HDMI) as an end point to see what's going on)
    P.S. the role of the EH57 is completely unknow (and maybe useless) to me, and it seems to be there just to convert DV to HDMI. Better to capture the "original" DV stream
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  30. Banned
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    Indeed. But if we did not start talking about the Cloner AP, we would not have that wonderful sample
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