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  1. I had to leave my computer on for 9 days straight to finish an x265 encode. This can't go on. Sleeping on my windows 7 machine doesn't work during an x265 encode even when I suspend the process via process explorer. But it works immediately after.
    It's summer and hot as hell in my room as it is so it would be awesome if I could either pause and resume with x265 at will or get stand-by to work somehow.
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  2. Member
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    A good application will allow pause and resume encoding ... but you have not told us what application is in current use
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  3. 1. setting the whole machine into sleep/standby mode should normally work without any major problem (at least it did work without a problem when using x264 and it should basically be the same with x265; not sure if may be the 'numa' support might cause problems here)
    Do you use x265 directly in a console, otherwise just suspending x265 might not be enough.
    2. pausing the encoding process, without closing the process itself should also work without a problem. Note that the memory consumption will still be the same.
    Hybrid and other encoding frontends normally do this when they pause a process, which is probably the same process explorer does when suspending the process.
    3. Pausing an encoding process, freeing the reserved memory and closing the process to later resume it, normally isn't possible since it would require to dump the memory used during the encoding and on resume reassign it. (this is theoretically possible, but would a. require administrator rights and b. a lot of programming and possibly some extension of the source code of the encoder)
    users currently on my ignore list: deadrats, Stears555
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  4. on my computer, when I use x265 through ffmpeg, when I hit the pause key on the keyboard, I can then put the computer to sleep. If I am not comfortable using the command line, I can drag and drop the file into yax265 Gui and it works for me too.

    1. I drag and drop the file I want to encode into the GUI.
    2. I hit the start button on the right.
    3. When I want to put the computer to sleep, I hit the pause button on my keyboard.
    4. To resume the encode, I wake the computer up and hit the enter button on my keyboard.
    Last edited by ezcapper; 26th Jul 2015 at 08:12. Reason: hit enter to restart, not pause
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  5. Originally Posted by Selur View Post
    1. setting the whole machine into sleep/standby mode should normally work without any major problem (at least it did work without a problem when using x264 and it should basically be the same with x265; not sure if may be the 'numa' support might cause problems here)
    Numa?

    Originally Posted by Selur View Post
    Do you use x265 directly in a console, otherwise just suspending x265 might not be enough.
    Yes, with avs4x26x. I haven't tried suspending avs4x26x until now though.

    Can I get a quick sample command-line of how one would encode to x265 with it? I never used ffmpeg directly before. I wanna see if sleeping will work when ffmpeg is doing the encoding.
    yax265 I'm not gonna use because it won't let me fine-tune my settings.
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  6. Banned
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    Originally Posted by -Habanero- View Post
    I had to leave my computer on for 9 days straight to finish an x265 encode. This can't go on. Sleeping on my windows 7 machine doesn't work during an x265 encode even when I suspend the process via process explorer. But it works immediately after.
    It's summer and hot as hell in my room as it is so it would be awesome if I could either pause and resume with x265 at will or get stand-by to work somehow.
    Why would you need to put your computer to sleep?
    If it gets too hot for your liking just lower the clock speed.

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  7. You can't lower your clock speed while your OS is running, idiot.
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  8. Originally Posted by -Habanero- View Post
    Can I get a quick sample command-line of how one would encode to x265 with it? I never used ffmpeg directly before. I wanna see if sleeping will work when ffmpeg is doing the encoding.
    .

    I'm assuming you're doing this on 32bit OS ?

    You can encode directly from a 32bit avs input with 32bit ffmpeg that has avs support complied (e.g. zeranoe's builds) using libx265

    e.g no audio (-an means no audio) , elementary .265 stream (or you can use mkv or mp4 if you want it to mux it)

    Code:
    ffmpeg -i input.avs -c:v libx265 -crf 20 -an output.h265
    many, but not all of the x265 options are supported with ffmpeg's -x265-params setting
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  9. Originally Posted by -Habanero- View Post
    You can't lower your clock speed while your OS is running, idiot.
    You can on some motherboards; Some have a clocking utility and can be used to adjust various overclock/underclock settings through a GUI in the OS

    But the old skool (and more reliable) way is still through the bios
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  10. Apparently --ref is an unrecognized option to ffmpeg. Here's my script:
    Code:
    ffmpeg -i ng2.avs -c:v libx265 -x265-params --crf 26 -preset veryslow --ref 16 --bframes 16 --keyint 600 --no-psy-rd --no-psy-rdoq --rc-lookahead 250 --qcomp 0.7 --allow-non-conformance -an ng2.hevc
    I'm thinking I should just do this in a VM since I don't plan on using all the RAM anyway. x265 is way too slow for any large resolutions.

    You said in another thread that the 64-bit version is way faster. Does it make sense to use a 64-bit VM in a 32-bit host? I'm thinking the emulation overhead would make this 9-day encode take a year. Please tell me I'm wrong.
    Also what's the best OS to use in a VM for something like this? One with the lowest resource footprint will be best.
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    Originally Posted by -Habanero- View Post
    You can't lower your clock speed while your OS is running, idiot.
    You can, at least on modern computers you can.

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  12. That's not the syntax you use for x265-params (or x264-params)

    It's key=value:key=value....

    Each call requires an "equal" sign, and each entry is separated by a colon

    e.g
    -x265-params ref=4:keyint=30:whatever=...

    ffmpeg doesn't use double dashes like "--something" , there is only one dash like "-something"



    I don't know about virtualization, there might be additional overhead that negates some of the speed benefit . But the performance delta was surprisingly large between 32bit and 64bit for x265, much larger than for x264. I didn't expect it to be that large

    OS wise - Linux seems to be faster for everything x265 (same with x264) . Everything seems to perform slightly better on linux in terms of benchmark FPS
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  13. You can on some motherboards; Some have a clocking utility and can be used to adjust various overclock/underclock settings through a GUI in the OS
    My computer came with overclocking software with all kinds of neat-sounding features like AI automatic over/underclocking for smart power management and all that. I could not change the frequency by more than 50 MHz without freezing the OS and its automated AI feature would greatly slow every component of the PC (including network speed) to a crawl. I also got this neat widget that would tell me how many nanograms of carbon emissions I have prevented from going into the atmosphere thanks to running my system a few megahertz slower.
    How useful, I can run my system 50 mhz slower to delay global warming by a few nanoseconds and 50 mhz faster so my 2 hour encode finishes 2 seconds ahead of time.

    If newbball wanted to suggest cutting power usage or whatever, it's a lot easier to just lower the core affinity. It takes seconds to do with task manager and won't crash your OS.

    Thanks for the heads up with the ffmpeg syntax.

    Anyone have suggestions for which Linux distro to use? I'm gonna test those both on Windows 7 x64 VM and whatever Linux VM I'm recommended.
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  14. Originally Posted by -Habanero- View Post


    Anyone have suggestions for which Linux distro to use? I'm gonna test those both on Windows 7 x64 VM and whatever Linux VM I'm recommended.
    Sorry - not much experience with linux. It's definitely on my to-do list

    I keep on seeing these benchmarks and without a doubt, everything is faster on linux with x265 (and x264) on the same hardware configuration. Most of the developers use linux , maybe that's part of the reason why. I'm wondering like crap, why is Windows always slower ? (it's always ~2-4% slower) . But Windows still has full claim to avisynth. The linux variants aren't as capable, missing features or still have certain issues
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