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  1. So I have a few Blu-rays that I wish to back up however the original audio tracks on disc are useless unless I play them on a Blu-ray player so I prefer to re-encode the audio to AAC and AC3 so that I can play the back ups on multiple devices.

    Now I'm looking for a GUI encoder that is able to convert DTS-HD MA and LPCM audio to AAC and AC3 so if anyone can list me a few encoders that would be much appreciated.

    Another thing I've stumbled across is that AAC is capable of a 7.1 channel track so I would also like to know what encoders or how to encode a 7.1 DTS-HD MA or LPCM to AAC 7.1 audio track.

    Thanks.
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  2. I would imagine SUPER would work well for you
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  3. You can extract and convert using eac3to. There's a few GUI's for it. I use the HD Streams Extractor built into MeGUI although there's a standalone version (I'm not sure if it's been updated for the latest eac3to yet).
    You can extract the audio or convert while extracting (it'll also open MKVs if you've already ripped the discs). When converting to AAC I'm pretty sure it encodes with NeroAAC and the default variable bitrate quality setting (q.50). You can add various options to the command line manually.
    https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Eac3to/How_to_Use#Command_Line_Syntax
    You''ll need something like AnyDVD HD running in the background to open copy protected discs.

    By default I'm pretty sure the number of channels won't change, at least for AAC encoding. The number of channels for the source should be the same for the output.

    I do most of my audio encoding with foobar2000 and generally I rip to flac first with the HD Streams Extractor and then re-encode the flac file. Partly because ripping from disc is slow so by ripping to a lossless file first I can experiment with different encoder settings etc without re-ripping each time. Plus I'm not sure if there's foobar2000 plugins for more recent audio types (DST-HD or Dolby TrueHD etc), but once the file is ripped to flac you should be able to convert it with almost any audio program. MeGUI's audio encoder section will re-encode lots of audio types.
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  4. Originally Posted by hello_hello View Post
    You can extract and convert using eac3to. There's a few GUI's for it. I use the HD Streams Extractor built into MeGUI although there's a standalone version (I'm not sure if it's been updated for the latest eac3to yet).
    You can extract the audio or convert while extracting (it'll also open MKVs if you've already ripped the discs). When converting to AAC I'm pretty sure it encodes with NeroAAC and the default variable bitrate quality setting (q.50). You can add various options to the command line manually.
    https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Eac3to/How_to_Use#Command_Line_Syntax
    You''ll need something like AnyDVD HD running in the background to open copy protected discs.

    By default I'm pretty sure the number of channels won't change, at least for AAC encoding. The number of channels for the source should be the same for the output.

    I do most of my audio encoding with foobar2000 and generally I rip to flac first with the HD Streams Extractor and then re-encode the flac file. Partly because ripping from disc is slow so by ripping to a lossless file first I can experiment with different encoder settings etc without re-ripping each time. Plus I'm not sure if there's foobar2000 plugins for more recent audio types (DST-HD or Dolby TrueHD etc), but once the file is ripped to flac you should be able to convert it with almost any audio program. MeGUI's audio encoder section will re-encode lots of audio types.
    Thanks for the detailed reply, I shall give this a try.
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  5. I thought someone else would have offered suggestions by now.

    I meant to post back to say eac3to decoding of DTS-HD and TrueHD might have limitations. I suspect it's not but this might be worth a read if you bump into problems. https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Eac3to/How_to_Use#Audio_Decoders
    I haven't re-encoded much TrueHD myself and I'm not sure I've re-encoded any with mixed sample rates.
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  6. Originally Posted by hello_hello View Post
    I thought someone else would have offered suggestions by now.

    I meant to post back to say eac3to decoding of DTS-HD and TrueHD might have limitations. I suspect it's not but this might be worth a read if you bump into problems. https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Eac3to/How_to_Use#Audio_Decoders
    I haven't re-encoded much TrueHD myself and I'm not sure I've re-encoded any with mixed sample rates.
    Well after you recommended MeGUI, I figured a way round the decoding of DTS-HD.

    As a test I managed to get MeGUI to encode AAC 7.1 by using MakeMKV to back up the main movie and covert the DTS-HD 7.1 to Flac 7.1 then added NeroAAC encoder to MeGUI which works well when selecting keep original channels however I am going to test out the decoding of DTS-HD and TrueHD.
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  7. Member
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    Originally Posted by ManiKz View Post
    Originally Posted by hello_hello View Post
    I thought someone else would have offered suggestions by now.

    I meant to post back to say eac3to decoding of DTS-HD and TrueHD might have limitations. I suspect it's not but this might be worth a read if you bump into problems. https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Eac3to/How_to_Use#Audio_Decoders
    I haven't re-encoded much TrueHD myself and I'm not sure I've re-encoded any with mixed sample rates.
    Well after you recommended MeGUI, I figured a way round the decoding of DTS-HD.

    As a test I managed to get MeGUI to encode AAC 7.1 by using MakeMKV to back up the main movie and covert the DTS-HD 7.1 to Flac 7.1 then added NeroAAC encoder to MeGUI which works well when selecting keep original channels however I am going to test out the decoding of DTS-HD and TrueHD.
    Please accept my apologies for resurrecting an old thread, but can someone please point out where you can configure the conversion to 7.1 channel FLAC in MakeMKV? I cant see anywhere to configure the output (audio) format.

    EDIT: sorry, reading again it looks like i misread and that you need to use MeGUI to conver tto FLAC, is that right?
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  8. I don't use MakeMKV but it does have the ability. There's some info here. It looks like you have to download ffmpeg, tell MakeMKV where it is, and then the profiles for converting audio to flac or wave become available to use..... or something like that.
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  9. Originally Posted by hello_hello View Post
    There's some info here. It looks like you have to download ffmpeg, tell MakeMKV where it is, and then the profiles for converting audio to flac or wave become available to use..... or something like that.
    The link actually says you don't need an additional ffmpeg version anymore. (I assume the info on DTS-HD is outdated as well since the appearance of dcadec)
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  10. What I do for 7.1 DTS and True HD is convert them to 8 channel flac in MakeMKV. It's an "advance" setting so you cant see it by default. In MakeMKV, you'll need to go to View > Preferences > General then tick the expert mode box.

    With a disc open in MakeMKV, click on the 7.1 audio track and to the right of the window will be the profile drop down box, change is from default to flac. Create a remux with that enabled.

    Next you'll need NeroAAC downloaded and put into the "tools" folder in the MeGUI directory. Once done, open MeGUI and enable NeroAAC from the settings.

    Open the remux that you created with flac in MeGUI and eventually you get prompt to extract and encode the audio. Choose NeroAAC for codec and make sure "Keep original tracks" is selected in the audio encode settings. Choose your bitrate settings etc and it should encode a 7.1 AAC audio track that you can then mux with the remux or encode of the original video track etc.

    As far as I'm aware the highest quality with NeroAAC is between 1000kbps and 1500kbps bitrate. You can however choose constant bitrate at a maximum of 640kbps.
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  11. Originally Posted by sneaker View Post
    The link actually says you don't need an additional ffmpeg version anymore. (I assume the info on DTS-HD is outdated as well since the appearance of dcadec)
    So it does. I should have read it a little more carefully.
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  12. Hello,

    Not sure if it is the right thread. But I'm attaching two audio files.

    Sample1 is trash and Sample2 is a 'gem'.

    There are 2 questions:

    1- how was superb audio Sample2 created?

    2- Is there any hope to improve quality of Sample2?


    Thanks.
    Image Attached Files
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