VideoHelp Forum

Try DVDFab and download streaming video, copy, convert or make Blu-rays,DVDs! Download free trial !
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 17 of 17
Thread
  1. I have several videos authored for dvd that I want to upload to our company website for sale. My problem is that the ecommerce software we use only recognizes individual files for download not folders, so the videos don't have navigation incorporated into them. Any ideas on format or software to address this issue?
    Quote Quote  
  2. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Deep in the Heart of Texas
    Search PM
    What kind of "navigation" are you referring to? - Menus? Chapters? Links? Branching (while playing the video)?
    Some can do one or another, no format can currently do all (though MKV or MP4 are your best bets).

    Scott
    Quote Quote  
  3. Banned
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Northern California
    Search PM
    Originally Posted by steve baker View Post
    I have several videos authored for dvd that I want to upload to our company website for sale. My problem is that the ecommerce software we use only recognizes individual files for download not folders, so the videos don't have navigation incorporated into them. Any ideas on format or software to address this issue?
    Zip it!

    Problem solved.

    Quote Quote  
  4. I'm a MEGA Super Moderator Baldrick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Sweden
    Search Comp PM
    Make an iso from the dvd and play with vlc.
    Quote Quote  
  5. Yes, the navigation I am referring to is menus etc. I have uploaded an ISO file and tested that theory by downloading it. The result is my computer wanting to burn the file to dvd, not play it. I have also created a zip file with the vob, bup etc. files, but there must be a code missing that tells the host computer's media player to assemble and play the video.
    Quote Quote  
  6. Originally Posted by Baldrick View Post
    Make an iso from the dvd and play with vlc.
    If all our customers used the vlc software, it would be perfect, but in this case unrealistic for our customer base.
    Quote Quote  
  7. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Deep in the Heart of Texas
    Search PM
    If you went either one of those routes, you'd have to have an app installed (on client PC) & associated that understood the VIDEO_TS files/folders within either the ISO or the ZIP.

    ISO might work with Kodi.

    Scott

    Regardless of your choice, the sticking point is going to be client installations, IMO.
    Quote Quote  
  8. Banned
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Northern California
    Search PM
    Originally Posted by steve baker View Post
    There must be a code missing that tells the host computer's media player to assemble and play the video.
    There is no such thing.

    DVDs come in a particular format.

    But, the good news is that any decent media player should be able to handle it, just provide instructions to your customers to double click on the .ifo file.

    Quote Quote  
  9. Can you bundle the portable VLC version with the ISO download in a zip file ?
    Quote Quote  
  10. Banned
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Northern California
    Search PM
    Originally Posted by poisondeathray View Post
    Can you bundle the portable VLC version with the ISO download in a zip file ?
    The DVDs are sold commercially.
    Distributing VLC as part of a commercial product may be not be in compliance with the licensing terms.
    Quote Quote  
  11. Originally Posted by newpball View Post
    Originally Posted by poisondeathray View Post
    Can you bundle the portable VLC version with the ISO download in a zip file ?
    The DVDs are sold commercially.
    Distributing VLC as part of a commercial product may be not be in compliance with the licensing terms.
    Good point!
    Quote Quote  
  12. Originally Posted by newpball View Post
    Originally Posted by steve baker View Post
    There must be a code missing that tells the host computer's media player to assemble and play the video.
    There is no such thing.

    DVDs come in a particular format.

    But, the good news is that any decent media player should be able to handle it, just provide instructions to your customers to double click on the .ifo file.

    I think the easiest way to go, since these are instructional videos, is to upload each lesson as an individual file, or offer one continuous video with entire curriculum.

    Thank you all for your contributions and wisdom!
    Quote Quote  
  13. Just as a follow-up mkv files will handle all the information in one container. Turns out my encoder has a rendering option of mkv that I was not aware of. Too many formats and codecs, not enough time! ��
    Quote Quote  
  14. Originally Posted by steve baker View Post
    Just as a follow-up mkv files will handle all the information in one container. Turns out my encoder has a rendering option of mkv that I was not aware of. Too many formats and codecs, not enough time! ��
    MKV won't handle menus. Only chapters.
    Quote Quote  
  15. Banned
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Northern California
    Search PM
    Originally Posted by steve baker View Post
    Originally Posted by newpball View Post
    Originally Posted by steve baker View Post
    There must be a code missing that tells the host computer's media player to assemble and play the video.
    There is no such thing.

    DVDs come in a particular format.

    But, the good news is that any decent media player should be able to handle it, just provide instructions to your customers to double click on the .ifo file.

    I think the easiest way to go, since these are instructional videos, is to upload each lesson as an individual file, or offer one continuous video with entire curriculum.

    Thank you all for your contributions and wisdom!
    Nope I think the best way is to use a video on demand site and have the customer pay per view.
    Quote Quote  
  16. Another possible method of delivery is with HTML5 . You can have traditional DVD style menus and navigation pretty easily, and it's even possible to do fancy stuff beyond the realm of DVD. It can be played offline , on devices (eg. ipad), since just about everyone has a web browser. You can also avoid MPEG-LA fees (that small outfits usually don't pay in the first place) if you use webm .
    Quote Quote  
  17. Originally Posted by poisondeathray View Post
    Another possible method of delivery is with HTML5 . You can have traditional DVD style menus and navigation pretty easily, and it's even possible to do fancy stuff beyond the realm of DVD. It can be played offline , on devices (eg. ipad), since just about everyone has a web browser. You can also avoid MPEG-LA fees (that small outfits usually don't pay in the first place) if you use webm .
    Ahh...yet another format...I will play with webm on our beta site as well as the mkv container. The bottom line for me is that our customer database is older and not too "IT savvy". As a result, the easier and less complicated the better; the end customer must be able to use whatever media player is embedded with their operating system.
    Quote Quote