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  1. Member brassplyer's Avatar
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    I have a project which is mostly 16:9 DV standard def 720 x 480, currently HuffYuv. I have a 4:3 720x480 HuffYuv segment I want to add to it. How do I manipulate the 4:3 so it matches the 16:9? I.e. so Vegas sees it as 16:9 720x480 without choking on it? Retaining the correct AR of the image of the 4:3 image of course. Eventually will be making both 720x480 DVD and 1280x720 Blu-Ray versions.

    Thanks.
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  2. Member racer-x's Avatar
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    There should be a script in Vegas to remove letterbox. You'll have to select the clip and run the script. Then you'll need to zoom in to fill the screen.
    Got my retirement plans all set. Looks like I only have to work another 5 years after I die........
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  3. Member brassplyer's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by racer-x View Post
    There should be a script in Vegas to remove letterbox. You'll have to select the clip and run the script. Then you'll need to zoom in to fill the screen.
    What you're describing is the opposite of what I want to do. Basically what I'm asking is what do I need to resize the 720x480 4:3 image to, so that it ends up as a pillarboxed 16:9 720x480 image.
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  4. Member racer-x's Avatar
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    A 4:3 image should be pillarboxed by default when you import it into a 16:9 project.....

    Right-click on the Clip and select properties. Make sure the pixel aspect ratio is 0.9091 (NTSC DV)
    Got my retirement plans all set. Looks like I only have to work another 5 years after I die........
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  5. Resize 720x480 4:3 DAR to 540x480 then add pillarbox bars, 90 columns on the left, 90 columns on the right. Encode 16:9 DAR.
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  6. Member budwzr's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by brassplyer View Post
    I have a project which is mostly 16:9 DV standard def 720 x 480.....
    720X480 is not 16:9.
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  7. Keep project DV widescreen, NTSC , 720x480

    -adjust clips, for those Huffyuv 720x480, which is 16:9, by telling Vegas that it is 16:9, NTSC DV widescreen, or exact aspect ratio , in properties for the clip, not project properties, because aspect ratio info is not stored in that avi container
    -do not adjust project properties
    -so when you load Huffyuv 4:3, again, tell Vegas what aspect ratio (choosing NTSC DV) is in properties for clip, then pillarbox is created,
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  8. Member budwzr's Avatar
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    Vegas operates by the numbers too. You can use Track Motion to resize anything. Just enter the pixel dimensions directly in the Track Motion dialog.

    It's as simple as falling off a log. Why would Vegas "choke" on anything? It's a full blown editor. It doesn't choke.
    Last edited by budwzr; 1st Feb 2015 at 11:31.
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    Originally Posted by budwzr View Post
    720X480 is not 16:9.
    Being shot with a standard def DV camcorder it's a 20:11 (1.82:1) frame indeed, so slightly wider. But Vegas handles this properly, selecting NTSC DV in the 4:3 clips properties (actually it's not 4:3 either, it's 15:11 (1.36:1)) will pillarbox it to 3/4 the original width (720 -> 540) which is correct.
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  10. Member budwzr's Avatar
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    In my opinion, the best way to work in Vegas, or any other NLE, is to learn to use manual control on all your media. When you manually conform your media, you elevate yourself beyond checkboxes and settings, and in the process gain full creative control of your project.

    I always "hand craft" each piece of media to fit my needs, as opposed to dumping it into the timeline and then looking for automation to make it work.
    Last edited by budwzr; 1st Feb 2015 at 12:16.
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    Resize 4:3image inside a 720x480 frame for display in a 16:9 video:
    NTSC 16:9 PAR = 40:33.
    The height of the new image will be 480.
    New width will be (640 / 40:33) = (640 / 1.21212) = 528 -- or use the width for 1.36:1 video
    Add 96 pixels each side to get 720x480 and encode at 6:9 DAR.

    That's the way I've seen it done elsewhere.
    Or as jagabo suggested, 540x480. You won't get an exact 4:3 at 16:9, but it'll be close. Will be a couple of pixels off in width either way.

    4:3 image at 4:3
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    4:3 resized to 528x480 with 96 pixels each side:
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    16:9 display:
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    Last edited by LMotlow; 2nd Feb 2015 at 12:49.
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    Originally Posted by LMotlow View Post
    Resize 4:3image inside a 720x480 frame
    The mistake is, you are assuming the entire 720x480 source frame represents 4:3, whereas, since it's native SD camcorder footage, it's a 15:11 (1.36:1) frame, so slightly wider. You said yourself the NTSC 16:9 PAR is 40:33, so the 4:3 equivalent is 10:11.
    720 * (10/11) / 480 = 15/11

    Hence...
    Originally Posted by LMotlow View Post
    Or as jagabo suggested, 540x480.
    ...is exact (and still slightly wider than 4:3).
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  13. In Vegas you all of that is not necessary, all clips just has to be interpreted to get aspect ratio those clips really have if Vegas cannot read aspect ratio in the clip, in this case of course it cannot read it because it is not stored in that avi container. Vegas has choices there for NTSC DV or widescreen NTSC DV aspect ratio or one can input aspect ratio manually if not satisfied with Vegas for some reason. Also pan-crop could be used for these sort of things but I'd start to interpret clips first.

    That goes for all editing softwares I think. Having project properties as desired and just interpret clips if needed. To resize something upon loading is not necessary at all.
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  14. Originally Posted by _Al_ View Post
    In Vegas you all of that is not necessary, all clips just has to be interpreted to get aspect ratio those clips really have if Vegas cannot read aspect ratio in the clip, in this case of course it cannot read it because it is not stored in that avi container. Vegas has choices there for NTSC DV or widescreen NTSC DV aspect ratio or one can input aspect ratio manually if not satisfied with Vegas for some reason. Also pan-crop could be used for these sort of things but I'd start to interpret clips first.

    That goes for all editing softwares I think. Having project properties as desired and just interpret clips if needed. To resize something upon loading is not necessary at all.
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    Originally Posted by Skiller View Post
    Originally Posted by LMotlow View Post
    Resize 4:3image inside a 720x480 frame
    The mistake is, you are assuming the entire 720x480 source frame represents 4:3, whereas, since it's native SD camcorder footage, it's a 15:11 (1.36:1) frame, so slightly wider. You said yourself the NTSC 16:9 PAR is 40:33, so the 4:3 equivalent is 10:11.
    720 * (10/11) / 480 = 15/11

    Hence...
    Originally Posted by LMotlow View Post
    Or as jagabo suggested, 540x480.
    ...is exact (and still slightly wider than 4:3).
    You'll noticve that I was using a 1.33:1 image in the example -- mainly because the pics are oldies and I didn't want to remake them. Replace the 640 width with a 1.36:1 width and the formula for PAR 40:33 gives you a width of 538.65, which you would round to 540. For a 1.33:1 image, it comes to 528. I use that same formula to restore a lot of classic films that are at 1.37:1.

    540 isn't mod-8 anyway. But 536 is.
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