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  1. So I been doing a lot of recording lately gathering footage for a project I am working on. Now I have the likes of about 200gb of footage and I want to start weeding out bits of each clip to compress and move to another folder.

    Is there any programs that will do this all the while keeping a very easy workflow and when it compresses keeps the highest possible quality of the original footage?

    ---

    Or is there a better way? What are your workflows from moving large raw files into interesting clips that can be used for a final video?
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  2. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    What is/are your camera model(s)?

    What is your definition of RAW? Is it...
    A) Non-debayered full sensor linear/log pixel storage (the usual profession term for RAW)
    B) "Straight-from-the-Camera" original format, whether compressed as DV/HDV, MPEG2, AVC-MP4, AVCHD, etc (the usual consumer term for raw)
    C) something else

    If B, like I assume, does all your footage have the SAME format (aka from the same camera using the same setting)? What might that/those be?
    Please use MediaInfo detailed text readouts as examples.

    Until we know details like that, we couldn't get very far beyond vague generalities.

    Scott
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  3. Hi Scott,

    Thanks for the reply, and yes you nailed it, it would be, B. I am not a professional but I love working with video, its a passion and a hobby. I use Sony Vegas to edit though I feel like I need something else sometimes, I just use it because its very easy to work with. I have a couple of GoPro's and a Sony SLT (DLSR), soon I will be getting the DJI Phantom Vision Plus quadcopter.

    GoPRO MediaInfo
    General
    Complete name : D:\My Media - Stock Video\2014 Vegas Trip\GOPR0186.MP4
    Format : MPEG-4
    Format profile : JVT
    Codec ID : avc1
    File size : 241 MiB
    Duration : 44s 461ms
    Overall bit rate mode : Variable
    Overall bit rate : 45.5 Mbps
    Encoded date : UTC 2014-04-28 05:03:00
    Tagged date : UTC 2014-04-28 05:03:00
    AMBA : 

    Video
    ID : 1
    Format : AVC
    Format/Info : Advanced Video Codec
    Format profile : High@L4.2
    Format settings, CABAC : Yes
    Format settings, ReFrames : 1 frame
    Format settings, GOP : M=1, N=8
    Codec ID : avc1
    Codec ID/Info : Advanced Video Coding
    Duration : 44s 461ms
    Bit rate mode : Variable
    Bit rate : 45.0 Mbps
    Width : 1 920 pixels
    Height : 1 080 pixels
    Display aspect ratio : 16:9
    Frame rate mode : Constant
    Frame rate : 59.940 fps
    Color space : YUV
    Chroma subsampling : 4:2:0
    Bit depth : 8 bits
    Scan type : Progressive
    Bits/(Pixel*Frame) : 0.362
    Stream size : 239 MiB (99%)
    Title : GoPro AVC
    Language : English
    Encoded date : UTC 2014-04-28 05:03:00
    Tagged date : UTC 2014-04-28 05:03:00
    Color primaries : BT.709
    Transfer characteristics : BT.709
    Matrix coefficients : BT.709
    Color range : Full

    Audio
    ID : 2
    Format : AAC
    Format/Info : Advanced Audio Codec
    Format profile : LC
    Codec ID : 40
    Duration : 44s 459ms
    Bit rate mode : Constant
    Bit rate : 128 Kbps
    Channel(s) : 2 channels
    Channel positions : Front: L R
    Sampling rate : 48.0 KHz
    Compression mode : Lossy
    Stream size : 695 KiB (0%)
    Title : GoPro AAC
    Language : English
    Encoded date : UTC 2014-04-28 05:03:00
    Tagged date : UTC 2014-04-28 05:03:00


    SONY SLT MediaInfo
    General
    ID : 0 (0x0)
    Complete name : D:\Projects - Vegas\2014 - Leanna MMA\Leanna Vids\Naga HD Cam\00051.MTS
    Format : BDAV
    Format/Info : Blu-ray Video
    File size : 151 MiB
    Duration : 47s 956ms
    Overall bit rate mode : Variable
    Overall bit rate : 26.5 Mbps
    Maximum Overall bit rate : 28.0 Mbps

    Video
    ID : 4113 (0x1011)
    Menu ID : 1 (0x1)
    Format : AVC
    Format/Info : Advanced Video Codec
    Format profile : High@L4.2
    Format settings, CABAC : Yes
    Format settings, ReFrames : 2 frames
    Format settings, GOP : M=1, N=15
    Codec ID : 27
    Duration : 48s 48ms
    Bit rate mode : Variable
    Bit rate : 25.2 Mbps
    Maximum bit rate : 26.0 Mbps
    Width : 1 920 pixels
    Height : 1 080 pixels
    Display aspect ratio : 16:9
    Frame rate : 59.940 fps
    Color space : YUV
    Chroma subsampling : 4:2:0
    Bit depth : 8 bits
    Scan type : Progressive
    Bits/(Pixel*Frame) : 0.202
    Stream size : 144 MiB (95%)

    Audio
    ID : 4352 (0x1100)
    Menu ID : 1 (0x1)
    Format : AC-3
    Format/Info : Audio Coding 3
    Mode extension : CM (complete main)
    Format settings, Endianness : Big
    Codec ID : 129
    Duration : 48s 64ms
    Bit rate mode : Constant
    Bit rate : 256 Kbps
    Channel(s) : 2 channels
    Channel positions : Front: L R
    Sampling rate : 48.0 KHz
    Bit depth : 16 bits
    Compression mode : Lossy
    Stream size : 1.47 MiB (1%)
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  4. Nothing at all wrong with Vegas. Being easy to use is often considered a good thing.

    Which version are you using, and what do you feel it's lacking?


    In your case, I would load all of your footage into Vegas and subclip it into manageable selects, then use those for further editing. Stick the material you're not using into a closed bin so it's out of your way.
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  5. I feel that its lacking the ability to do higher quality generated media, text and effects. I see some really cool things done in Adobe After effects but I cannot get close to mimic'ing it in Vegas. I have loaded up After Effects a few times but I am just lost.
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  6. Agreed, After Effects is a completely different kind of tool than Vegas. Adobe's Vegas equivalent would be Premiere. Premiere and Vegas are for editing footage (which was your initial question,) and basic effects. AE is capable of very sophisticated 2D compositing and animation.

    Given what you seem to have and seem to know already, I wouldn't think AE would be too big a hurdle for you -- start with baby steps, and understand that literally no single person knows or uses all of its capabilities.

    AE by the way is a terrible, cumbersome editor.
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  7. Would you say Premiere is better than Vegas? IF so/not in what regards?
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  8. They are both excellent. With the Pro versions it comes down to personal preference. Free trials exist for both.
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  9. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    For your needs, they would be nearly the same, with Vegas maybe slightly edging out Premiere in the ease-of-use category.

    Scott
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  10. Thanks Scott,

    Circling back to my original question with the data I posted, what would you recommend to convert the video into a compressed format with minimal loss for saving? Or should I? I keep hearing about Handbrake? Is that something I should use?

    Is the trimmer in Vegas the best method for creating subclips? Or would there be a better program to recommend?
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  11. Originally Posted by fabes253 View Post
    Is the trimmer in Vegas the best method for creating subclips? Or would there be a better program to recommend?
    Subclips (with specific exceptions) are just links to portions of your original files. There's no conversion involved. Use your NLE's own tools to do that.
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  12. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    OK, so you have got somewhere between 10-20 hours of footage there (based on the 2 cams' bitrates). That's a good chunk.

    Here's my questions: how much are you going to work on at a time? And, what data capacity do you have overall?

    Here's what I'm thinking: the best way to retain quality in those clips is to not do anything to modify their integrity. So, GOP-based (I-frame-only) editing is best, then smart-rendering-capable frame-accurate editing is next (some minor recompression with GOP boundaries), then standard full recompression style dumb-rendering editing is least desirable. The next thing to think about is if your editing projects are going to be doing more than just simple edits. If not and it IS just simple edits, you would simply live with cuts on the I-frame, or look to find a smart-rendering editor that worked with your material (mainly variations on AVC). OTOH, if you are going to be doing transitions, titles, FX, layering/compositing, etc., and/or if you intend to COMBINE material from differing sources (and when I say that, I mean not IDENTICAL in format & settings), then smart-rendering won't do you good anyway because much of your material might need to be rendered regardless of positioning.
    This, and for edit performance smoothness reasons, is why it makes sense to:
    A) Convert to a single common format, and
    B) Upconvert to a lossless or near-lossless I-frame-based digital intermediate codec

    Doing these would very likely greatly increase your capacity needs (which is why I asked), but it trades off via increased bitrate & decreased codec complexity the different priorities of space usage vs. CPU/GPU resource burden.
    There is ALWAYS loss with lossy recompression, but using a lossless codec avoids that, and using a near-lossless codec makes the loss in- or barely-visible.

    BTW, similarly with audio, unless you are expecting to remain keeping everything in it's original form, I strongly suggest you upconvert ALL your audio assets to LPCM (aka uncompressed WAV) for editing & mastering.

    Then, when you are ready to provide some materials for final viewing & distribution, that is when you do one more recompression to your target format(s).

    ***************

    I disagree with your assessment of title/FX in Vegas - it has more depth than is first apparent. However, if you have difficulty with AE, you will likely not be ready to create such higher-quality generated FX/media anyway (and Vegas allows & would require plugins and/or complicated layering and keyframing, just like AE once you desire to get to that level).

    Scott
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  13. Wow great information and some of it is out of my realm of knowledge. GOP (I looked it up group of pictures?), I-frame, and "smart-rendering-capable frame-accurate" are terms I am not familiar with so I could only consume a portion of what was said, though your opinions are not any less appreciated.

    I will likely be working with 3-4 hours of footage at any one sitting, but an entire project might include footage spanning over 20 hours. Data capacity is 4x 4TB drives so I hope Im good there.

    As for up converting to a recommended codec, what program, what codec would be good considering the original files are avc format?
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