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  1. Hello, I bought 2 HDMI cables (no name brands) from amazon. I have 2 Sony TVs, one is newer and one is much older, both are LCD TVs. My laptop can be outputted using one of the HDMI cables to both TVs. However, with the other HDMI cable, my laptop can only be outputted to the older Sony LCD. The newer Sony LCD won't read it. Is this normal? Even when I try to change the Function F8 on my laptop, it doesnt seem to read it. The other one just auto connects. Are all HDMI cables not the same?
    Last edited by jyeh74; 20th Apr 2015 at 14:33.
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  2. Mountains of gear vaporeon800's Avatar
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    Just sounds like a borderline cable. It would probably work if you forced a lower resolution.

    Return it for exchange as defective, assuming you don't have to pay for the shipping back.
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  3. Originally Posted by vaporeon800 View Post
    Just sounds like a borderline cable. It would probably work if you forced a lower resolution.

    Return it for exchange as defective, assuming you don't have to pay for the shipping back.
    Tried changing the resolution but it doesnt work.
    So how come it works on the older model TV? Newer TVs have different settings or something?
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  4. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Yes, ALL HDMI cables are not the same. And, newer TVs have different settings (1080p or better native vs. 720p vs. 768p, etc.).
    You get what you pay for.

    Scott
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    Originally Posted by jyeh74 View Post
    Originally Posted by vaporeon800 View Post
    Just sounds like a borderline cable. It would probably work if you forced a lower resolution.

    Return it for exchange as defective, assuming you don't have to pay for the shipping back.
    Tried changing the resolution but it doesnt work.
    So how come it works on the older model TV? Newer TVs have different settings or something?
    No, it is a probably not different settings. There could be a tiny physical difference in the connections on the two TVs and the connectors on the cable. Sometimes just turning the cable around and using the opposite end can provide better connection.

    [Edit] Within reason, you get what you pay for. I wouldn't buy an HDMI cable from a dollar store. However a 6-foot $5 HDMI cable can work just as well as a 6-foot $100 HDMI cable, as long as they are both certified. Build quality and the size of the wires matters more with longer length cables.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 4th Dec 2014 at 23:55.
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  6. The old TV is a Sony XBR3 that works with the amazon $5 hdmi cable.
    The newer TV is a Sony KDL 70 that does not work with the cable.
    Both are 1080p TVs.
    Last edited by jyeh74; 23rd Apr 2015 at 12:33.
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    always buy your HDMI cables from monoprice... I too have the Sony KDL 70 and never had a cable problem when using their
    quality cables
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    All I can tell you is that I've got four of the Amazon branded HDMI cables going right now and I've never had a problem with any of them to my Vizio TV.

    Others in the past have recommended monoprice but I've never bought from them. That means I have no personal experience with their stuff, not that I am against them.
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  9. The thing about monoprice is that you can be sure you're getting good cables at a very good price. Their standard high-speed rated HDMI cables are 24 gauge with quality connectors (and ferrite cores too if that matters). You can get good cables at Amazon or elsewhere, sure, but they sell some stuff that looks iffy as well.

    I suspect usually_quiet is right and the problem is the connectors.
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  10. ˝ way to Rigel 7 cornemuse's Avatar
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    My big brother (he's in his 70's) bought a $60.00 hdmi cable 'cause the (commissioned) salesman told him the ends were 'gold plated'. He wondered why all his friends laughed at him.

    I just bought one at Frys on sale for $1.58, works fine.

    -c-
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  11. Originally Posted by fritzi93 View Post
    The thing about monoprice is that you can be sure you're getting good cables at a very good price. Their standard high-speed rated HDMI cables are 24 gauge with quality connectors (and ferrite cores too if that matters). You can get good cables at Amazon or elsewhere, sure, but they sell some stuff that looks iffy as well.

    I suspect usually_quiet is right and the problem is the connectors.
    Thanks! I am looking for a 15 feet or 20 feet HDMI cable. Some are thinner than others. Can you recommend any from Monoprice that work well?
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    Originally Posted by cornemuse View Post
    My big brother (he's in his 70's) bought a $60.00 hdmi cable 'cause the (commissioned) salesman told him the ends were 'gold plated'. He wondered why all his friends laughed at him.

    I just bought one at Frys on sale for $1.58, works fine.

    -c-
    Exactly.

    People who play 'monstercable" prices for digital connections are fools with parted money.

    Digital connections either work or they don't work, there is nothing in between.
    Last edited by newpball; 20th Apr 2015 at 17:17.
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  13. Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by jyeh74 View Post
    Originally Posted by vaporeon800 View Post
    Just sounds like a borderline cable. It would probably work if you forced a lower resolution.

    Return it for exchange as defective, assuming you don't have to pay for the shipping back.
    Tried changing the resolution but it doesnt work.
    So how come it works on the older model TV? Newer TVs have different settings or something?
    No, it is a probably not different settings. There could be a tiny physical difference in the connections on the two TVs and the connectors on the cable. Sometimes just turning the cable around and using the opposite end can provide better connection.

    [Edit] Within reason, you get what you pay for. I wouldn't buy an HDMI cable from a dollar store. However a 6-foot $5 HDMI cable can work just as well as a 6-foot $100 HDMI cable, as long as they are both certified. Build quality and the size of the wires matters more with longer length cables.
    nope I tried switching the cables and wiggling it around, nothing works. Isn't HDMI all the same size?
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  14. Originally Posted by jyeh74 View Post
    Isn't HDMI all the same size?
    There are at least five different sizes. But that's not the point. He was talking about manufacturing variations. Since your new TV doesn't like the cable throw it out and get another. Or use the bad cable on your old TV and the good one on the new TV.
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    Originally Posted by newpball View Post
    ...Digital connections either work or they don't work, there is nothing in between.
    Not quite true.

    At a fundamental level, all digital connections are really analog connections and so will degrade just as standard analog connections do. However, it is the error-correction in the code that should detect & correct the errors to give you a pristine digital signal at output.

    Since there is degradation, there is a point at which error-correction does not work, and at that point you will get bad output. However, there are times with digital cabling & equipment where the "cutoff" is not a single steep cliff, but a jagged bluff. This is due to many factors, but the result is: the digital signal works-doesn't-works-doesn't-works, etc., sometimes within the same KB or Byte being sent. And since there is a window of opportunity for the source to resend, it's possible for that window to get missed for some of the live signals, so there are "MIDDLE" areas where it partly but not fully works.

    Some of the main factors that influence this susceptibility in cable are: length of cable, braiding quality (resistance to EMI/RFI and avoidance of kinks/breaks), and connection solidity (strong solder points, conductive electrical material).
    So there is still a strong correlation between manufacturing quality/cost & reliability/quality, even in digital stuff. It's just no longer an obvious choice.

    The good thing is: for digital, most COMMON cabling (at appropriate lengths) is quite good enough in most situations.

    Scott
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    Originally Posted by jyeh74 View Post
    Originally Posted by fritzi93 View Post
    The thing about monoprice is that you can be sure you're getting good cables at a very good price. Their standard high-speed rated HDMI cables are 24 gauge with quality connectors (and ferrite cores too if that matters). You can get good cables at Amazon or elsewhere, sure, but they sell some stuff that looks iffy as well.

    I suspect usually_quiet is right and the problem is the connectors.
    Thanks! I am looking for a 15 feet or 20 feet HDMI cable. Some are thinner than others. Can you recommend any from Monoprice that work well?
    Their "Commercial Series" HDMI cable product lines include the lengths you want and use either 24AWG or 22AWG wires. Redmere cables are thinner but they are directional (one end is designated for the source and one end is designated for the destination) and include electronics that draw power from the cable to provided amplification. The electronics can fail, so it's better to use heavier cables with no electronics instead, if possible.
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    With respect to Monoprice, it is just a label folks not a quality standard!

    Everybody can do it, you make up a name, register it, get a nice logo and do some marketing and make cool wrapping. Then buy generic cables from China and stick on your label, do the markup and voila you got a brand!

    Generic cables, Monoprice or not, seems to work just fine, it is no (longer) rocket science.

    The only time I would recommend no compromise cables is for live capture and cabling behind the walls.

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    Originally Posted by newpball View Post
    With respect to Monoprice, it is just a label folks not a quality standard!

    Everybody can do it, you make up a name, register it, get a nice logo and do some marketing and make cool wrapping. Then buy generic cables from China and stick on your label, do the markup and voila you got a brand!

    Generic cables, Monoprice or not, seems to work just fine, it is no (longer) rocket science.

    The only time I would recommend no compromise cables is for live capture and cabling behind the walls.

    You neglected to mention HDMI cables also need to pass certification testing to guarantee the cable is compliant. Not all cheap HDMI cables are certified, although almost any HDMI cable works up to about 10 feet, certified or not. As far as I can tell, Monoprice's HDMI cables are all certified.

    HDMI cables that use 28AW, are good up to about 15 feet. Past 15 feet, heavier gauge wires, 24AWG or 22AWG, are used to reduce signal attenuation. After about 45-60 feet, even cables using heavier gauge wire will probably not pass certification.

    Redmere cables and some others have built-in amplification so that thin wires can be used for longer cables and still pass certification.
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    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    You neglected to mention HDMI cables also need to pass certification testing to guarantee the cable is compliant.
    I know an inspector sits down and inspects every single cable by hand before it goes out the factory!

    HDMI is licensed, that means that for each copy a cut goes to "the syndicate". I am sure "the syndicate" sends out a man once a year to take a look if things are OK, right between a big lunch and a dinner obviously accompanied with the best Wǔliángyč.



    Last edited by newpball; 21st Apr 2015 at 11:23.
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    Originally Posted by newpball View Post
    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    You neglected to mention HDMI cables also need to pass certification testing to guarantee the cable is compliant.
    I know an inspector sits down and inspects every single cable by hand before it goes out the factory!

    HDMI is licensed, that means that for each copy that goes out of the factory a cut goes to "the syndicate". I am sure "the syndicate" sends out a man once a year to take a look if things are OK, right between a big lunch and a dinner obviously accompanied with the best Wǔliángyč.


    You are trolling again I see.

    Of course the design is certified rather than each individual cable, and the manufacturer merely submits samples for testing. The quality of each cable is determined by the level of quality control at the factory. Monoprice wouldn't stay in business very long if many of their cables were defective, so I presume they have a way of dealing with a supplier that sends them many defective cables.
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    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    [
    Of course the design is certified rather than each individual cable, and the manufacturer merely submits samples for testing. The quality of each cable is determined by the level of quality control at the factory. Monoprice wouldn't stay in business very long if many of their cables were defective, so I presume they have a way of dealing with a supplier that sends them many defective cables.
    I suppose so.

    Long time ago I got a sweet options deal from their parent company pre-IPO, would have been good for about $6M in five years, but I declined the offer.

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    I've got three of these "Super Slim" cables in 10 ft and 6 ft varieties. They look similar to the nGear "34AWG OD4.2MM" so I assume they use the same gauge. One of them is borderline when I connect my WDTV directly to my Samsung HDTV; random cuts to black, sparklies, etc. But the same cable connected with my AVR in the middle works with no issue.
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  23. Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by newpball View Post
    With respect to Monoprice, it is just a label folks not a quality standard!

    Everybody can do it, you make up a name, register it, get a nice logo and do some marketing and make cool wrapping. Then buy generic cables from China and stick on your label, do the markup and voila you got a brand!

    Generic cables, Monoprice or not, seems to work just fine, it is no (longer) rocket science.

    The only time I would recommend no compromise cables is for live capture and cabling behind the walls.

    You neglected to mention HDMI cables also need to pass certification testing to guarantee the cable is compliant. Not all cheap HDMI cables are certified, although almost any HDMI cable works up to about 10 feet, certified or not. As far as I can tell, Monoprice's HDMI cables are all certified.

    HDMI cables that use 28AW, are good up to about 15 feet. Past 15 feet, heavier gauge wires, 24AWG or 22AWG, are used to reduce signal attenuation. After about 45-60 feet, even cables using heavier gauge wire will probably not pass certification.

    Redmere cables and some others have built-in amplification so that thin wires can be used for longer cables and still pass certification.
    I searched online and found these Redmere cables you are referring to. Monoprice suggested them too.

    Ultra Slim 18Gpbs Active High Speed - $24.40
    http://www.monoprice.com/Product?p_id=10767&rep=joe

    How are they different than these? I am only using 15 ft for connecting laptop to tv, for music and movies and youtube and browsing net.

    Select Series -$5.79
    http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10240&cs_id=1024009&p_id=2529&seq=1&format=2

    Select Metallic - $7.99
    http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10250&cs_id=1025502&p_id=9305&seq=1&format=2

    Select Active Series High Performance - $13.99
    http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10255&cs_id=1025507&p_id=9169&seq=1&format=2

    Ultra Slim Series High Performance - $21.42 (probably because they are thinner but how are they different from the first one)
    http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10255&cs_id=1025503&p_id=9891&seq=1&format=2


    Then they have their Commerical series, like these two but I dont know the difference.
    http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10240&cs_id=1024004&p_id=3663&seq=1&format=2
    http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10240&cs_id=1024012&p_id=4160&seq=1&format=2
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  24. Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by newpball View Post
    With respect to Monoprice, it is just a label folks not a quality standard!

    Everybody can do it, you make up a name, register it, get a nice logo and do some marketing and make cool wrapping. Then buy generic cables from China and stick on your label, do the markup and voila you got a brand!

    Generic cables, Monoprice or not, seems to work just fine, it is no (longer) rocket science.

    The only time I would recommend no compromise cables is for live capture and cabling behind the walls.

    You neglected to mention HDMI cables also need to pass certification testing to guarantee the cable is compliant. Not all cheap HDMI cables are certified, although almost any HDMI cable works up to about 10 feet, certified or not. As far as I can tell, Monoprice's HDMI cables are all certified.

    HDMI cables that use 28AW, are good up to about 15 feet. Past 15 feet, heavier gauge wires, 24AWG or 22AWG, are used to reduce signal attenuation. After about 45-60 feet, even cables using heavier gauge wire will probably not pass certification.

    Redmere cables and some others have built-in amplification so that thin wires can be used for longer cables and still pass certification.
    usually_quiet

    So does it mean the 36AWG wires are no good at 15ft? Like these two Monoprice is recommending? I think they might be overkill. I don't even have a 4k TV

    http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10255&cs_id=1025508&p_id=10767&seq=1&format=2
    http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10255&cs_id=1025503&p_id=9891&seq=1&format=2
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    Originally Posted by jyeh74 View Post
    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post

    You neglected to mention HDMI cables also need to pass certification testing to guarantee the cable is compliant. Not all cheap HDMI cables are certified, although almost any HDMI cable works up to about 10 feet, certified or not. As far as I can tell, Monoprice's HDMI cables are all certified.

    HDMI cables that use 28AW, are good up to about 15 feet. Past 15 feet, heavier gauge wires, 24AWG or 22AWG, are used to reduce signal attenuation. After about 45-60 feet, even cables using heavier gauge wire will probably not pass certification.

    Redmere cables and some others have built-in amplification so that thin wires can be used for longer cables and still pass certification.
    I searched online and found these Redmere cables you are referring to. Monoprice suggested them too.

    Ultra Slim 18Gpbs Active High Speed - $24.40
    http://www.monoprice.com/Product?p_id=10767&rep=joe

    How are they different than these? I am only using 15 ft for connecting laptop to tv, for music and movies and youtube and browsing net.

    Select Series -$5.79
    http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10240&cs_id=1024009&p_id=2529&seq=1&format=2

    Select Metallic - $7.99
    http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10250&cs_id=1025502&p_id=9305&seq=1&format=2

    Select Active Series High Performance - $13.99
    http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10255&cs_id=1025507&p_id=9169&seq=1&format=2

    Ultra Slim Series High Performance - $21.42 (probably because they are thinner but how are they different from the first one)
    http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10255&cs_id=1025503&p_id=9891&seq=1&format=2


    Then they have their Commerical series, like these two but I dont know the difference.
    http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10240&cs_id=1024004&p_id=3663&seq=1&format=2
    http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10240&cs_id=1024012&p_id=4160&seq=1&format=2
    Look at the supported resolutions. The two least expensive cables are only recommended for 1080i or 720p, maximum. If your laptop is connected to a 1080p TV and the laptop can output 1080p video, you should get a cable that supports 1080p.

    The Commercial series cables and the less expensive Redmere cables are rated for 1080p. The most expensive Redmere cable is rated for 4K, although that may be moot since HDMI as we know it today might not end up as the connection of choice for 4K. Those would all work for 1080p.

    The Commercial series cables are very stiff and heavy, so they aren't very practical for anything other than a permanent connection. You would probably find the thinner Redmere cables are easier to manage with a laptop. However, recall that they have to be connected correctly. The source end has to be connected to the laptop, and the destination end must be connected to the TV.

    Originally Posted by jyeh74 View Post

    usually_quiet

    So does it mean the 36AWG wires are no good at 15ft? Like these two Monoprice is recommending? I think they might be overkill. I don't even have a 4k TV

    http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10255&cs_id=1025508&p_id=10767&seq=1&format=2
    http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10255&cs_id=1025503&p_id=9891&seq=1&format=2
    The 36AWG cables need amplification. Redmere technology provides that. Yes, the 4K rated cables are unnecessary.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 21st Apr 2015 at 13:19.
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  26. You are correct. It states that some of the "active" wires are considered directional so you do have to connect the source to the laptop and the destination to the TV. I wonder why they do this? What are "active" wires? It's easier when they are not directional so either end goes to either end and you don't have to check all the time.

    Some have higher Gbps transfers like the 10Gbps data throughout vs 18Gbps data throughput. Does that matter for internet browsing or playing movies off the computer?

    Is 36AWG too small for 15 ft? I recall you saying that HDMI cables up to 15ft should use 28AWG. Does 36AWG lose any signals, etc?
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    Originally Posted by jyeh74 View Post
    You are correct. It states that some of the "active" wires are considered directional so you do have to connect the source to the laptop and the destination to the TV. I wonder why they do this? What are "active" wires? It's easier when they are not directional so either end goes to either end and you don't have to check all the time.

    Some have higher Gbps transfers like the 10Gbps data throughout vs 18Gbps data throughput. Does that matter for internet browsing or playing movies off the computer?

    Is 36AWG too small for 15 ft? I recall you saying that HDMI cables up to 15ft should use 28AWG. Does 36AWG lose any signals, etc?
    The amplification circuitry in the connectors is what makes them directional. Amplification is normally applied at the source.

    10Gbps data throughout should be sufficient.

    At 15 ft, 28AWG cables benefit from amplification, and 36AWG cables need amplification. Redmere technology provides that.

    I would go with either one of these:
    Select Active Series High Performance - $13.99
    http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10255&cs_id=1025507&p_id=9169&seq=1&format=2

    Ultra Slim Series High Performance - $21.42 (probably because they are thinner but how are they different from the first one)
    http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10255&cs_id=1025503&p_id=9891&seq=1&format=2
    [Edit] Please realize that it is possible for the connector on the TV or the laptop to be a little bit off spec, or become damaged through use, and to be a source of problems, not just the connectors on cables. If that is the case, you may continue to have problems with most cables.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 21st Apr 2015 at 18:54.
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    $21.42 for a 15ft HDMI cable?

    For those who are not fooled by Monster there is always Monoprice to pick up the slack!

    Jeez!
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  29. Originally Posted by newpball View Post
    $21.42 for a 15ft HDMI cable?

    For those who are not fooled by Monster there is always Monoprice to pick up the slack!

    Jeez!
    That's what I said. I am leaning toward to $13.98 one. But that one is thicker with 28AWG vs the more expensive $21.42 one which is 36AWG. I guess you pay for thinner cables?
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  30. Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by jyeh74 View Post
    You are correct. It states that some of the "active" wires are considered directional so you do have to connect the source to the laptop and the destination to the TV. I wonder why they do this? What are "active" wires? It's easier when they are not directional so either end goes to either end and you don't have to check all the time.

    Some have higher Gbps transfers like the 10Gbps data throughout vs 18Gbps data throughput. Does that matter for internet browsing or playing movies off the computer?

    Is 36AWG too small for 15 ft? I recall you saying that HDMI cables up to 15ft should use 28AWG. Does 36AWG lose any signals, etc?
    The amplification circuitry in the connectors is what makes them directional. Amplification is normally applied at the source.

    10Gbps data throughout should be sufficient.

    At 15 ft, 28AWG cables benefit from amplification, and 36AWG cables need amplification. Redmere technology provides that.

    I would go with either one of these:
    Select Active Series High Performance - $13.99
    http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10255&cs_id=1025507&p_id=9169&seq=1&format=2

    Ultra Slim Series High Performance - $21.42 (probably because they are thinner but how are they different from the first one)
    http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10255&cs_id=1025503&p_id=9891&seq=1&format=2
    [Edit] Please realize that it is possible for the connector on the TV or the laptop to be a little bit off spec, or become damaged through use, and to be a source of problems, not just the connectors on cables. If that is the case, you may continue to have problems with most cables.
    The HDMI connection on my laptop works with the older XBR3 TV from 2007. It doesn't work with the newer TVs from 2012-2013. I tried all the different HDMI outputs on the newer TVs but not of them work with this HDMI cable and laptop.
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