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  1. Member
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    TSSniper won't load a .TS file because of a Directshow filtergraph error. Googling, it appears that installing "ffdshow" and "haali media splitter" will allow TSSniper to load without the filtergraph error.

    From what I've read, removing ffdshow is straight forward using it's uninstall program. But removing haali media splitter just leaves a hole since Directshow doesn't know what media splitter was being used prior to installing haali.

    Have you had any problems after installing either ffdshow or haali media splitter? Is it not recommended to install either one?

    If I install both, should I install the 32bit versions?

    I'm running Win7 Home Premium 64bit on an i5 with 8GB ram.

    Thanks for any help,
    mks
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  2. I've read several places that Haali can sometimes get corrupted, though I dunno why, and I haven't seen it personally. In that case, again supposedly, an uninstall will leave junk behind that buggers a re-install. So you should manually delete the Haali folder (after uninstall) and run something like CCleaner to clean up the orphan registry entries before re-installing. Maybe that should also be done regardless if installing a new version over an older one. Or if merely uninstalling Haali.

    I recommend ffdshow without hesitation. IMO it's far better than installing codecs willy-nilly. It's kind of an all-in-one codec (or perhaps more accurately, a semi-unified project), rather than a codec pack, which often cause conflicts. Though there are a lot of fingers in that project, and I personally wouldn't use the latest release (I use the versions of ffdshow and Haali tested by jdobbs, the developer of BDRB). As to Haali, I've used it for quite a long time without problems. And I also use TsSniper to edit my Hauppauge HD-PVR captures.

    You could use LAV Filters in place of Haali; reviews on the tool page have been positive.

    I can't address your question about whether Haali leaves a hole in the registry upon uninstall. (Manual folder deletion and registry cleanup might avert that, can't say).

    [EDIT] The versions I use can be found here, along with LAV Filters:

    http://forum.doom9.org/showthread.php?t=143716

    If you install both Haali and LAV Filters, install Haali first. As to TsSniper, I use scene mode (scenes are defined). DirectShow setting can be either automatic or Haali AR, either should work if Haali is installed. Dunno if TsSniper will use LAV Filters, as I haven't tried it.

    Good luck.
    Last edited by fritzi93; 17th Nov 2014 at 16:49.
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    Originally Posted by fritzi93 View Post
    I've read several places that Haali can sometimes get corrupted, though I dunno why, and I haven't seen it personally. In that case, again supposedly, an uninstall will leave junk behind that buggers a re-install. So you should manually delete the Haali folder (after uninstall) and run something like CCleaner to clean up the orphan registry entries before re-installing. Maybe that should also be done regardless if installing a new version over an older one. Or if merely uninstalling Haali.

    I recommend ffdshow without hesitation. IMO it's far better than installing codecs willy-nilly. It's kind of an all-in-one codec (or perhaps more accurately, a semi-unified project), rather than a codec pack, which often cause conflicts. Though there are a lot of fingers in that project, and I personally wouldn't use the latest release (I use the versions of ffdshow and Haali tested by jdobbs, the developer of BDRB). As to Haali, I've used it for quite a long time without problems. And I also use TsSniper to edit my Hauppauge HD-PVR captures.

    You could use LAV Filters in place of Haali; reviews on the tool page have been positive.

    I can't address your question about whether Haali leaves a hole in the registry upon uninstall. (Manual folder deletion and registry cleanup might avert that, can't say).

    [EDIT] The versions I use can be found here, along with LAV Filters:

    http://forum.doom9.org/showthread.php?t=143716

    If you install both Haali and LAV Filters, install Haali first. As to TsSniper, I use scene mode (scenes are defined). DirectShow setting can be either automatic or Haali AR, either should work if Haali is installed. Dunno if TsSniper will use LAV Filters, as I haven't tried it.

    Good luck.
    Fritzi93,

    Thanks much for your info. I downloaded and installed ffdshow and Haali (MatroskaSplitter.exe) per the jdobbs link that you posted. TSSniper can load my PVR2 1512 .TS files now. Problem is that if I cut out a segment and play the exported .TS file with VLC, the file plays fine to the start of the first cut and the video turns to a gray still, the audio stops, but the playback progress indicator keeps moving. Windows Media player freezes at the start of the first cut. WinTV7 freezes at the first cut. GOM player plays the exported video OK.

    Any ideas?
    mks
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  4. I have a suspicion that TsSniper works better with 720p than 1080i. I've (almost) always captured 720p with my HD-PVR, the exceptions being T/B or SxS 3D transport streams. The edited 1080i files often freeze at the join, depending on the software player used.

    However, I found MPC-BE to be very forgiving (I previously used MPC-HC). No freezing or other problems.

    It also seems to me that the more edits in the file, the greater the likelihood of problems. I've noticed that the run time of edited files may be wrong, which can often times be fixed by running the edited file through TsSniper again to re-index it and save. Again, I use scene mode, which has worked better for me than cut mode.

    So there you are. If you want to be a cheapskate and edit H.264 files with freeware (like me ), TsSniper is IMO the only halfway usable software. And it's certainly not perfect. BTW, my edited transport streams, both 720p and 1080i, play just fine on the onboard media players of my 65" LG and 70" Sharp HDTVs (via USB from external hard drives). Or via Plex.

    Good luck.
    Last edited by fritzi93; 18th Nov 2014 at 06:45.
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    Originally Posted by fritzi93 View Post
    I have a suspicion that TsSniper works better with 720p than 1080i. I've (almost) always captured 720p with my HD-PVR, the exceptions being T/B or SxS 3D transport streams. The edited 1080i files often freeze at the join, depending on the software player used.

    However, I found MPC-BE to be very forgiving (I previously used MPC-HC). No freezing or other problems.

    It also seems to me that the more edits in the file, the greater the likelihood of problems. I've noticed that the run time of edited files may be wrong, which can often times be fixed by running the edited file through TsSniper again to re-index it and save. Again, I use scene mode, which has worked better for me than cut mode.

    So there you are. If you want to be a cheapskate and edit H.264 files with freeware (like me ), TsSniper is IMO the only halfway usable software. And it's certainly not perfect. BTW, my edited transport streams, both 720p and 1080i, play just fine on the onboard media players of my 65" LG and 70" Sharp HDTVs (via USB from external hard drives). Or via Plex.

    Good luck.
    Hi Fritzi93,

    You've been of great help in allowing me to get TSSniper working so I could evaluate it. TSSniper is not quite ready for prime time for me.

    I've found that the original 1080i captures from my PVR2 1512 played from my PC via HDMI to our 1080p HDTV set exhibits interlace combing on vertical edges when using VLC or GOM video players. But if I use WinTV7 that came with the PVR2, the interlace combing doesn't happen on the HDTV set. So whatever editor I use to cut out commercials will need to be compatible with WinTV7. So I guess I'll have to give up on TSSniper.

    I think I'll just trim the beginning and end of captured movies using Hauppauge Capture and live with the commercials.

    Thanks again,
    mks
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  6. Yeah, that would probably be best then. H.264 is a real bastard to edit, since it's a highly compressed delivery format not really intended to be editable. Just one question: Are you editing transport streams or m2ts files? I found that capturing as transport stream is preferable if you intend to edit with TsSniper.

    There are payware programs that can do a better job than TsSniper, if you want to have a go. VideoReDo comes to mind. Maybe other members have some suggestions.
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  7. Video To Video Converter has a "commercial remover" under it's tools menu. I guess the usual "cut on keyframes" rule applies if you don't want to re-encode, but if memory serves me correctly you can open a video, cut it, and output what's left while remuxing to a different container if you want to. I can't say I've used it much for that sort of thing, but it lets you cut with a preview, so it's probably worth a try. There's a portable version if you don't want to install it.

    I do use Video To Video Converter a bit for "odd" remuxing jobs. Remuxing from one container to another when the usual tools won't do it.... that sort of thing. You just need to open a file, select "direct stream copy" from the list of conversion presets and choose your output format. It's probably worth keeping on your hard drive just for that.
    Last edited by hello_hello; 19th Nov 2014 at 07:22.
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    Originally Posted by fritzi93 View Post
    Yeah, that would probably be best then. H.264 is a real bastard to edit, since it's a highly compressed delivery format not really intended to be editable. Just one question: Are you editing transport streams or m2ts files? I found that capturing as transport stream is preferable if you intend to edit with TsSniper.
    Capturing to .TS files using Hauppauge Capture. I captured one movie as .MP4 using ShowBiz. I'm not sure but I think TS files are better suited to convert to m2ts in AVCHD for burning dual layer DVD9 discs that can be played in set-top Bluray players. (All new to me)

    There are payware programs that can do a better job than TsSniper, if you want to have a go. VideoReDo comes to mind. Maybe other members have some suggestions.
    I might buy VideoReDo if it was less than $50. But $100 is not worth it to me to remove commercials.

    Thanks!
    mks
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    Originally Posted by hello_hello View Post
    Video To Video Converter has a "commercial remover" under it's tools menu. I guess the usual "cut on keyframes" rule applies if you don't want to re-encode, but if memory serves me correctly you can open a video, cut it, and output what's left while remuxing to a different container if you want to. I can't say I've used it much for that sort of thing, but it lets you cut with a preview, so it's probably worth a try. There's a portable version if you don't want to install it.

    I do use Video To Video Converter a bit for "odd" remuxing jobs. Remuxing from one container to another when the usual tools won't do it.... that sort of thing. You just need to open a file, select "direct stream copy" from the list of conversion presets and choose your output format. It's probably worth keeping on your hard drive just for that.
    I followed the link to VideoToVideo Converter and in a thread, there was mention that V2Vconverter installs toolbars and new search page definitions even if you cancel or deny them. Have you experienced this? If not, where did you download from and which version are you using? ..... Also, I assume it does not re-encode when saving edited (commercials removed) video. Is that right?

    Thanks,
    mks
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  10. I think the "installer" includes extra stuff such as toolbars which you can probably elect not to install, but the portable version (there's a link on the same VideoHelp page) contains none of that. Just download it, unzip it, and run vv.exe
    I've downloaded several previous portable versions and never been inflicted with anything unwanted.

    By default, it doesn't re-encode when editing. After you've finished editing, you click "okay" and the conversion preset window will open. The "Direct Stream Copy" preset should be selected by default. You can change the output container on the right. Or you can pick a different conversion preset if you want to convert.

    The commercial remover lets you choose between ffmpeg and Avisynth for the input and output. Here's the description. I haven't played with it much myself.

    Click image for larger version

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    Originally Posted by hello_hello View Post
    I think the "installer" includes extra stuff such as toolbars which you can probably elect not to install, but the portable version (there's a link on the same VideoHelp page) contains none of that. Just download it, unzip it, and run vv.exe
    I've downloaded several previous portable versions and never been inflicted with anything unwanted.

    By default, it doesn't re-encode when editing. After you've finished editing, you click "okay" and the conversion preset window will open. The "Direct Stream Copy" preset should be selected by default. You can change the output container on the right. Or you can pick a different conversion preset if you want to convert.

    The commercial remover lets you choose between ffmpeg and Avisynth for the input and output. Here's the description. I haven't played with it much myself.
    .... snip ....
    I'll give the portable version a try and post results.

    Thanks!
    mks
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    Originally Posted by mks View Post
    Originally Posted by hello_hello View Post
    I think the "installer" includes extra stuff such as toolbars which you can probably elect not to install, but the portable version (there's a link on the same VideoHelp page) contains none of that. Just download it, unzip it, and run vv.exe
    I've downloaded several previous portable versions and never been inflicted with anything unwanted.

    By default, it doesn't re-encode when editing. After you've finished editing, you click "okay" and the conversion preset window will open. The "Direct Stream Copy" preset should be selected by default. You can change the output container on the right. Or you can pick a different conversion preset if you want to convert.

    The commercial remover lets you choose between ffmpeg and Avisynth for the input and output. Here's the description. I haven't played with it much myself.
    .... snip ....
    I'll give the portable version a try and post results.

    Thanks!
    mks
    Hello_Hello,

    Your suggestion to use Video to Video Converter to remove commercials is working out well! I used the portable version to edit a 2 hour movie in the .TS format. Used the commercial remover to remove all of the commercials and also to trim the front and end of the movie. The edited movie plays back fine and the audio to video sync at the end of the movie is spot on.

    I did run into two things though.

    1. After marking all of the commercials, I did the conversion but the output video was too short and it omitted several portions of the movie as well as the commercials. There was an option to "Reset task state" so I clicked it and then did the conversion again. This time the conversion took longer than the first time and the entire movie seems to be good (though I only spot checked it).

    2. The "Commercial Remover" trimmed the start of the video fine but it was not able to trim the end of the video properly. There are remnants of the very end of the original video still present. I guess I'll need to split the video first to trim the start and end, and then use the commercial remover to remove the commercials.

    The conversion only took about 6 to 8 minutes (did not time it) so that verifies that it did not re-encode the whole movie. Good stuff!

    Thank you very much for recommending Video to Video Converter. So far it is just what I was looking for to remove commercials.
    mks
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  13. Originally Posted by mks View Post
    The "Commercial Remover" trimmed the start of the video fine but it was not able to trim the end of the video properly. There are remnants of the very end of the original video still present. I guess I'll need to split the video first to trim the start and end, and then use the commercial remover to remove the commercials.
    That sounds like Video to Video Converter is seeking *forward* for a keyframe to cut on. Much like TsSniper does.

    The way to handle that in TsSniper is to set the granularity of manual timeline advance/reverse very fine, and back up a few frames from the desired cut point, then set the mark-out there. After a bit of practice, the results are pretty good. That applies for mark-in as well, but is less noticeable for obvious reasons, as you're not running past a transition.

    Dunno if you can do the same with Video to Video Converter.

    Anyway, thanks for the Video to Video Converter suggestion. I wasn't aware of that one, and will have a go.
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    Originally Posted by fritzi93 View Post
    Originally Posted by mks View Post
    The "Commercial Remover" trimmed the start of the video fine but it was not able to trim the end of the video properly. There are remnants of the very end of the original video still present. I guess I'll need to split the video first to trim the start and end, and then use the commercial remover to remove the commercials.
    That sounds like Video to Video Converter is seeking *forward* for a keyframe to cut on. Much like TsSniper does.

    The way to handle that in TsSniper is to set the granularity of manual timeline advance/reverse very fine, and back up a few frames from the desired cut point, then set the mark-out there. After a bit of practice, the results are pretty good. That applies for mark-in as well, but is less noticeable for obvious reasons, as you're not running past a transition.

    Dunno if you can do the same with Video to Video Converter.
    What actually happened when trimming the end of the video was that I marked the beginning of the segment and manually slid the slider to the end of the video. V2VC would not "Remove segment". So I clicked the "<<" button which I assume moves backward to the next key frame and then the "remove segment" worked. So I did expect to see remnants of the original video at the very end of the output video. No biggie actually, since normally I'll stop watching as soon as the end credits start scrolling. But to have a clean video, guess one should split the end of the video first.

    Anyway, thanks for the Video to Video Converter suggestion. I wasn't aware of that one, and will have a go.
    Welcome and yes, thanks hello_hello for the original suggestion. Fritzi93, if V2VC works as well for you as it has for me, you'll like it. Do post your results and any anomalies that you may encounter to add to the base of how to use V2VC.

    mks
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  15. It's possibly an issue with ts files. I tried an MKV and had no problem removing sections of it including removing a section at the end. I remuxed the MKV (containing h264 video) as a ts file with tsmuxer and when I opened it with the commercial remover, it gave me problems trying to remove a section at the end. Mostly, I couldn't even navigate right to the end of the video and each attempt seemed to land me on a different frame near the end, but not the last one.

    I know it's an extra step, but remuxing the ts file as an MKV with MKVMegeGUI first might be an idea. I guess if you really want a ts file you could remux the final output with tsmuxer, which would obviously be yet another step, but I'd generally prefer to keep the final output as MKV myself.

    I don't know why there's an issue with ts files. Video To Video Converter has both LAV and Haali sub-folders, so maybe it's a splitter problem, or maybe it's ffmpeg's fault (does it require third party splitter?). Whatever the reason, it appears remuxing as MKV fist might solve the problem.

    Edit: I gave version 2.9.1.11 of Video To Video Converter a spin and it's commercial remover seems to play with TS files better. For my test TS file it was still getting the total frame count very wrong and the last frame was being displayed as completely grey, but it did seem to cut where I told it to and it did seem to successfully remove the end section of the video. It was also getting the frame count slightly wrong for my test MKV, but worked fine cutting it too.

    Anyway, I'd try an older version. According to the change log the ffmpeg libraries have been updated a couple of times, so maybe that's the reason. I've had issues muxing raw AAC streams as M4A files with the latest version, but older versions work fine. There's lots of older versions to play with here.

    Or what about AVIDemux? I've barely used it but I'm pretty sure it'll edit pretty much as VirtualDub does and it has copy options for audio and video. I think there's a way to navigate between keyframes as VirtualDub does. I don't know if it'll open ts files, but if not you could remux as MKV first.

    Edit 2: I just remembered you referred to capturing ts files and converting them to AVCHD for burning dual layer DVD9 discs that can be played in set-top Bluray players. Are you converting or remuxing? Do the Bluray players in question not play MKVs? If they do, I'd simply be remuxing as MKV and burn them to disc if need be. If you need AVCHD, tsmuxer will remux ts and m2ts files. It'll split, but there's no preview like TSSniper. It'll also open some other file types such as MKV, Mp4 and VOB. Just in case you weren't aware of it....
    Last edited by hello_hello; 21st Nov 2014 at 20:57.
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    Originally Posted by hello_hello View Post
    It's possibly an issue with ts files. I tried an MKV and had no problem removing sections of it including removing a section at the end. I remuxed the MKV (containing h264 video) as a ts file with tsmuxer and when I opened it with the commercial remover, it gave me problems trying to remove a section at the end. Mostly, I couldn't even navigate right to the end of the video and each attempt seemed to land me on a different frame near the end, but not the last one.

    I know it's an extra step, but remuxing the ts file as an MKV with MKVMegeGUI first might be an idea. I guess if you really want a ts file you could remux the final output with tsmuxer, which would obviously be yet another step, but I'd generally prefer to keep the final output as MKV myself.

    I don't know why there's an issue with ts files. Video To Video Converter has both LAV and Haali sub-folders, so maybe it's a splitter problem, or maybe it's ffmpeg's fault (does it require third party splitter?). Whatever the reason, it appears remuxing as MKV fist might solve the problem.

    Edit: I gave version 2.9.1.11 of Video To Video Converter a spin and it's commercial remover seems to play with TS files better. For my test TS file it was still getting the total frame count very wrong and the last frame was being displayed as completely grey, but it did seem to cut where I told it to and it did seem to successfully remove the end section of the video. It was also getting the frame count slightly wrong for my test MKV, but worked fine cutting it too.

    Anyway, I'd try an older version. According to the change log the ffmpeg libraries have been updated a couple of times, so maybe that's the reason. I've had issues muxing raw AAC streams as M4A files with the latest version, but older versions work fine. There's lots of older versions to play with here.
    Video to video converter leaving remnants of the original video at the end when trimming the end using the commercial remover is not a problem at all for me. I always stop watching as soon as the movie ends and rarely view the credits at the end of a movie. But if I want the end of the output video to be clean, I'll just use the split function first. Not a problem.

    Or what about AVIDemux? I've barely used it but I'm pretty sure it'll edit pretty much as VirtualDub does and it has copy options for audio and video. I think there's a way to navigate between keyframes as VirtualDub does. I don't know if it'll open ts files, but if not you could remux as MKV first.
    I tried Avidemux previously but it didn't work for me. Anyway, I'm totally happy with how Video to video converter removes commercials as long as it keeps working as my one test video did.

    Edit 2: I just remembered you referred to capturing ts files and converting them to AVCHD for burning dual layer DVD9 discs that can be played in set-top Bluray players. Are you converting or remuxing? Do the Bluray players in question not play MKVs? If they do, I'd simply be remuxing as MKV and burn them to disc if need be. If you need AVCHD, tsmuxer will remux ts and m2ts files. It'll split, but there's no preview like TSSniper. It'll also open some other file types such as MKV, Mp4 and VOB. Just in case you weren't aware of it....
    I haven't gotten to the point of actually putting a movie on a DVD9 disc and testing in our Panasonic Bluray player yet. I thought videos had to be in the AVCHD (m2ts) format for burning HD videos on standard DVDs. I didn't know set-top Bluray players could play MKV videos on standard DVDs.

    BTW, my normal viewing of captured videos will be from an external hard drive attached to my i5 PC. Only once in a great while will I want to burn a movie on a DVD9 disc.

    Thanks,
    mks
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  17. The majority of Bluray players made today play standalone files such as MKV, MP4, TS or AVI etc. Some don't, but most do. Before Bluray players had the ability to play files via a USB input, they could only read them from disc (Bluray or DVD), but if they can play them via USB they should be able to play them via disc. The files would be burned to disc just as you'd burn any other data file. ie not as any sort of video disc. I don't know the model of your player, but you might want to check the manual. Not all video/audio formats are supported for every container, but they mostly play the common combinations. Support for h264 High Profile, level 4.1 is fairly normal.

    It's even hard to buy a TV these days that doesn't have a built-in USB media player. They'll usually play all the common standalone file types. Both my TV and Bluray player will happily read the contents of a hard drive up to 2TB in size, either FAT32 or NTFS, although some players still only support FAT32.
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    Originally Posted by hello_hello View Post
    The majority of Bluray players made today play standalone files such as MKV, MP4, TS or AVI etc. Some don't, but most do. Before Bluray players had the ability to play files via a USB input, they could only read them from disc (Bluray or DVD), but if they can play them via USB they should be able to play them via disc. The files would be burned to disc just as you'd burn any other data file. ie not as any sort of video disc. I don't know the model of your player, but you might want to check the manual. Not all video/audio formats are supported for every container, but they mostly play the common combinations. Support for h264 High Profile, level 4.1 is fairly normal.

    It's even hard to buy a TV these days that doesn't have a built-in USB media player. They'll usually play all the common standalone file types. Both my TV and Bluray player will happily read the contents of a hard drive up to 2TB in size, either FAT32 or NTFS, although some players still only support FAT32.
    Would it be correct to assume that AVCHD is the most compatible format for burning HD video on standard DVD discs to be played on set-top Bluray players? I sometimes shoot video and stills (assembled as slideshows) for special events for family and friends and distribute DVDs to them. I would like to use the most compatible HD video format that can be played on different set-top Bluray players. Up to now, I've only used standard definition video on standard DVDs so distributing HD video is new to me.

    Thanks,
    mks
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  19. Chances are AVCHD is more widely supported than MKV by Bluray players. Especially older players. I'd be surprised if there's many players manufactured today that don't support both. I don't use the AVCHD format so I'm no expert though. It's not compulsory for a Bluray player to support it so there's still no 100% guarantee. You might need to limit yourself to the original AVCHD specification. ie no 1080p at 50fps or 60fps. Then again, that'd probably apply to MKV too.
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    Originally Posted by hello_hello View Post
    Chances are AVCHD is more widely supported than MKV by Bluray players. Especially older players. I'd be surprised if there's many players manufactured today that don't support both. I don't use the AVCHD format so I'm no expert though. It's not compulsory for a Bluray player to support it so there's still no 100% guarantee. You might need to limit yourself to the original AVCHD specification. ie no 1080p at 50fps or 60fps. Then again, that'd probably apply to MKV too.
    Thanks again hello_hello. You've been of great help.
    mks
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