VideoHelp Forum

Try DVDFab and download streaming video, copy, convert or make Blu-rays,DVDs! Download free trial !
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 12 of 12
Thread
  1. Hello girls and guys,

    I need help with this problem:

    I got a video that was cut for a customer, but the customer did not like the music. So I was asked to compose new music for it and to cut the video to it. I got all the raw footage now and would like to keep the sequences of the original cut.

    Now it is very hard to find out which part of which raw video was used in the final cut. Thus my question:

    Is there any chance to align footage to another sequence by comparing the frames? Just as one could do with Red Giants "PluralEyes", but based on the frame content?

    Thanks a lot!
    Quote Quote  
  2. Your best bet is to get you hands on the original project files. Hopefully they used the same NLE you will be using. Pro-grade NLEs keep track of clip names and timecode for precisely this reason. (Even a second-tier NLE may tell you which clips were used.) That's the only way to reconstruct the video "automatically."

    If this was originally done in some half-baked way on a second-rate NLE, you will have no choice but to eye-match it. If your new music is similar enough in tempo, perhaps you don't actually need to recut the video.
    Quote Quote  
  3. No, I won't get the original project. So I really need a way to align the raw footage to the ready cut video.

    At least it would be good to be able to synch stills optically to the video. Isn't there any "find-a-photo-in-a-video"-software around somewhere? For sort of reverse engineering a cut?

    Thanks a lot!
    Quote Quote  
  4. Ok, maybe I found a way, although it will be inconvenient: I found a program that compares images by contents and shows a match-percentage. So maybe I can compare the raw clips converted to an image sequence to the image sequence of the cut video.
    Quote Quote  
  5. Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Search Comp PM
    You could try downloading DeDup and fiddling with the c++ source code. I discovered it was stupidly simple to write an AVISynth filter while I was writing ReDup, I just wish I could pull myself together enough to finish it, but the basic processes you need are already contained within DeDup (or possibly even just Dup), assuming you can write code.
    Quote Quote  
  6. How long and complex is this video? With all this effort to duplicate something that you're going to change anyway, you may save yourself a lot of time and trouble by starting from scratch. (Or eye-matching.)
    Last edited by smrpix; 14th Nov 2014 at 06:55.
    Quote Quote  
  7. Yes, you might be right, I could start from scratch. But nevertheless I'd be interested to know a solution for the problem at all, if one existed. The video itself is about three minutes, the raw footage might be two hours... So it is a lot to sort...
    Quote Quote  
  8. If someone ever needs a solution, this one worked for me finally:

    1.: Create one image per scene
    - export all images from the complete video as jpg at 100% quality and as smaller version, I chose 480x270, making sure the frame number is in the filename
    - from this image pool choose one image per scene, copy it to another folder

    2.: convert all raw footage to image sequences
    - export all images from the raw material (same format and quality as above, keeping the name of the raw-footage-file as name of the exported images)

    3.: compare scene pool with raw footage
    - use image comparer to generate lists of matching values as percentage, comparing the 1-image-per-scene folder to the complete pool of all raw images. when comparison finished, use "save log file" to create a txt-file, where results are saved (right-click above search result)

    4.: find the raw footage for a scene
    - use the most matching image pairs to identify the frame number of the matching image in the complete video. open the txt-file with the comparinson log and search for the "filename_[framenumer]"-pattern to find the matching raw footage

    Thanks a lot, hope someone will need it some time...
    Last edited by Karmaschinken; 14th Nov 2014 at 18:51.
    Quote Quote  
  9. Originally Posted by Karmaschinken View Post

    - export all images from the complete video (as smaller version, I chose 480x270)
    - export all images from the raw material (same format as above, keeping the name of the raw-footage-file as name of the exported images)
    - use image comparer to generate lists of matching values as percentage
    - use the most matching image pairs to identify the frame number of the matching image in the complete video
    - shuttle through the two hours of original material anyway to find the missing pieces
    Quote Quote  
  10. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Deep in the Heart of Texas
    Search PM
    Originally Posted by Karmaschinken View Post
    Hello girls and guys,

    I need help with this problem:

    I got a video that was cut for a customer, but the customer did not like the music. So I was asked to compose new music for it and to cut the video to it. I got all the raw footage now and would like to keep the sequences of the original cut.

    Now it is very hard to find out which part of which raw video was used in the final cut. Thus my question:

    Is there any chance to align footage to another sequence by comparing the frames? Just as one could do with Red Giants "PluralEyes", but based on the frame content?

    Thanks a lot!
    Wait a minute: you like the original, ready-made cut? Then just use it as-is. No need to re-cut. Put the video in the timeline, export your music track after you've synced it, then remux the new music track into the original video - replacing the old music. Done! No loss of the video and no wasted time.

    Unless you didn't describe what you're wanting (something else) thoroughly enough...

    Scott
    Quote Quote  
  11. Thanks for all your help. Actually I like the chosen scenes, but I want to have the cuts of the scenes to be on time with the beats. Thatīs not the case now, so I have to re-cut it.

    Nevertheless thanks a lot!
    Quote Quote  
  12. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Deep in the Heart of Texas
    Search PM
    Ok, that makes more sense now.

    Maybe you could get an EDL export of the original project file: it would have file/clip name + mark in + mark out timecodes. That would get you much further along much quicker. Plus the EDL is a small text file.

    If they can't do that, I agree with smrpix. It would probably be easier just to slog through & re-edit from scratch. Might even be quicker in the long run.

    Scott
    Quote Quote