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  1. Hi,

    Im trying work out the bit rate of a video with only this data:

    480 x 360 Resolution
    15 frames per second
    16 bits to encode each pixel

    Would anyone know of a formula to help me find out the bit rate of the video?

    Any help would be much appreciated
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  2. Banned
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    Here's what you think you are asking: Assuming the most direct and shortest path on land possible, what's the distance between New York and Los Angeles?

    Here's what you are really asking: What's the distance between Los Angeles and ______________ ? And you never specify what ___________ is.

    Your question is just as impossible to answer as my 2nd example because the key information is missing to even make a guess. None of the information you have provided is relevant to calculating the bit rate.
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  3. bitrate=filesize/time

    As jman says, nothing in the information you have provided is relevant.


    Theoretically your UNCOMPRESSED bitrate COULD be 480*360*16*15 but that's really a meaningless, nonsense answer.
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  4. Member DB83's Avatar
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    Basic maths says that to obtain one value from three variables then you must already know two of them.

    In your example you do not even know one of them.
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    Depends on which codec use. Example for H264 (2-pass) for optimum quality (24-bit):

    For H264
    : ((480 * 360 * 15 * 0.110) / 1000) = 285 kbps
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  6. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Hikmet View Post
    Depends on which codec use. Example for H264 (2-pass) for optimum quality (24-bit):

    For H264: ((480 * 360 * 15 * 0.110) / 1000) = 285 kbps
    Of course it depends on the codec, but your "optimum" is based on the FALSE assumption that all videos have the same image complexity (both inter- and intra-).

    I think the rest of us are all on the same page: neither you nor the OP can make a blanket statement like this (without looking like a fool) because there is WAY TOO MUCH missing info.

    Scott
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    Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    Originally Posted by Hikmet View Post
    Depends on which codec use. Example for H264 (2-pass) for optimum quality (24-bit):

    For H264: ((480 * 360 * 15 * 0.110) / 1000) = 285 kbps
    Of course it depends on the codec, but your "optimum" is based on the FALSE assumption that all videos have the same image complexity (both inter- and intra-).

    I think the rest of us are all on the same page: neither you nor the OP can make a blanket statement like this (without looking like a fool) because there is WAY TOO MUCH missing info.

    Scott
    No, this values tried many times and get good results. 0.110 QF is optimum quality factor for most video types, if videos has not much noise (also action films). If your codec configurations is good, than results is most quality and file size is smallest. If videos has still images/dark scenes or CGI, than this factor may little less, if has much noise than little high, or highest (depend how much noise).
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  8. Member DB83's Avatar
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    Too many 'Ifs'
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    Originally Posted by DB83 View Post
    Too many 'Ifs'
    If use one method for all video types, then decrease quality or increase file size. If want good "quality/file size" ratio, then think with too many "if".
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  10. Originally Posted by Will89 View Post
    Im trying work out the bit rate of a video with only this data:

    480 x 360 Resolution
    15 frames per second
    16 bits to encode each pixel
    Simple: width * height * fps * bits per pixel
    480 * 360 * 15 * 16 = 41,472,000 bits per second
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  11. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Simple if all you are trying to do is assign a static BPP for every pixel in the video, regardless of colordepth, complexity, quality or codec, and only want a CBR output.

    Scott
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  12. Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    Simple if all you are trying to do is assign a static BPP for every pixel in the video, regardless of colordepth, complexity, quality or codec, and only want a CBR output.

    Scott
    It's what he specified: "16 bits to encode each pixel".
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  13. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Oh I agree, sticking to the letter of the request. But as we both know, often the spirit of the request is much different.

    Scott
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