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  1. I just bought one of these devices...

    http://www.lg.com/us/data-storage/lg-BE14NU40

    It has the option with 4 layer discs to burn up to 125 GB to a disc, but with the discs I bought, they're one layer and support 25 GB. Some reason I can't get 25 GB on a disc. About the max I've been able to record to one is 23.5 GB.

    I was looking at someone else's post about this and they commented they think it's because the definition of 25 GB... media makers define a gigabyte as 1,000 MB where as the rest of the world defines a gigabyte as 1024 MB.

    Some reason I don't buy it. When I had blank CDs and blank DVDs, I could burn the full 650 MB and 4.7 GB. Why would blu-rays be any different?
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    23.5 GB on a BD25 is right.
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    Originally Posted by dorlow View Post
    I just bought one of these devices...

    Some reason I don't buy it. When I had blank CDs and blank DVDs, I could burn the full 650 MB and 4.7 GB. Why would blu-rays be any different?
    Blu-rays are not different. They are the same size convention as hard drives, dvds, memory cards, and flash drives.

    The one that is different is CDs, where you could actually burn 700MB of data and a 700MB disc.

    4.7GB of data can't be burned on a single layer DVD. The max capacity for a DVD+R is 4483MB. DVD-R is 4489MB.
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  4. So, I'm sure as the media gets larger, the amount of data that it can record compared to what it advertises is more noticable... Another question. This burner has the ability to burn up to a 4 layer bluray disc. I just looked at costs of a 3 layer disc and it's $100 a disc. I can't even find a 4 layer disc.

    I guess looking at DVD-R dual layers, they aren't too unreasonable. Just found a 50 pack of dual layers for $25. Does anyone know how long they were out on the market before they were reasonably priced? Just wondering how that will relate to bluray dual, triple and quadriple layer discs before they're reasonably priced.
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    Originally Posted by dorlow View Post
    So, I'm sure as the media gets larger, the amount of data that it can record compared to what it advertises is more noticable... Another question. This burner has the ability to burn up to a 4 layer bluray disc. I just looked at costs of a 3 layer disc and it's $100 a disc. I can't even find a 4 layer disc.

    I guess looking at DVD-R dual layers, they aren't too unreasonable. Just found a 50 pack of dual layers for $25. Does anyone know how long they were out on the market before they were reasonably priced? Just wondering how that will relate to bluray dual, triple and quadriple layer discs before they're reasonably priced.
    If you are buying anything other than Verbatim DVD+R DL, then you will probably be sorry that you did. You will have more bad burns using something other than Verbatim DVD+R DL, negating your savings. To answer your question on price, 9 GB Verbatim DVD+R DL costs about the same per disc as 25 GB Verbatim BD-R non-LTH. That is why I switched to BD-R for backing up my HD video files.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 30th Mar 2013 at 09:42.
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  6. I bought verbatim bd-r discs. the drive came with one sample verbatim disc. iI burned 8 of them now and everyone turned out fine. I'm using it for backing up my home video files and pictures. my backups were getting to exceed 300 GB and using DVD-Rs were getting to be rediculus for my semi-yearly backups. (I also run backups to hard drives and to remote servers... just another layer of backup defense.)
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  7. Media manufacturers rate the capacity in GB (1000 * 1000 * 1000). Windows reports file sizes in GiB (1024 * 1024 * 1024), though they don't use the GiB nomenclature. So when Windows shows a file is 25 GB the file is actually 26,843,545,600 (25 * 1024 * 1024 * 1024) bytes, 26.8 GB by the disc manufacture's way of counting.

    This is the same reason a 4.7 GB DVD only holds 4.3 GiB of data.
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    Originally Posted by dorlow View Post
    I bought verbatim bd-r discs. the drive came with one sample verbatim disc. iI burned 8 of them now and everyone turned out fine. I'm using it for backing up my home video files and pictures. my backups were getting to exceed 300 GB and using DVD-Rs were getting to be rediculus for my semi-yearly backups. (I also run backups to hard drives and to remote servers... just another layer of backup defense.)
    You are right, There is nothing wrong with Verbatim BD-R non-LTH media. It is very reliable. I use it myself. I was referring DVD DL media, when I said Verbatim DVD+R DL was the only good choice. I thought you might be considering using bargain DVD dual layer media instead of BD-R, but apparently not.

    Verbatim BD-R non-LTH media is a somehat safer choice than Verbatim BD-R LTH media. The LTH media, which costs a little less per disc than the non-LTH media does works well for some people, but certain Blu-Ray players and BD burners have problems with LTH BD media. I researched BD burners before I bought the Pioneer drive I'm using, and from what I remember, LG's BD burners can have difficulty with LTH media.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 30th Mar 2013 at 10:30.
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  9. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    BTW, 4-layer BDs are actually called BDXL discs. They can come as 100GB (93GiB) or 128GB (119GiB) sizes. You probably won't be using them soon, as a single 100GB disc usually costs $80 USD (as of Nov'12)!

    The problem people had with CD sizes had more to do with figuring out how much recording time was available (AudioCD mode vs. Data mode). Once you understood the difference the mode had on the sector sizes, it's easy to recalc the capacities.

    If you always do a 1000/1024 (per 000) adjustment of capacity for your estimates, you'll never be shorthanded again.
    With kB, it's 97.6% of the claimed capacity.
    With MB, it's 95.3%.
    With GB, it's 93.1%.
    With TB, it's 90.9%.

    Scott
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  10. Member [_chef_]'s Avatar
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    Originally Posted by dorlow View Post
    So, I'm sure as the media gets larger, the amount of data that it can record compared to what it advertises is more noticable... Another question. This burner has the ability to burn up to a 4 layer bluray disc. I just looked at costs of a 3 layer disc and it's $100 a disc. I can't even find a 4 layer disc.
    $100 for a 3layer (TL) BD-R is a ripoff, it can be obtained for 35 and above...
    QL aka 4layer BD-R is available for about 90 or so, whoever needs that.

    Anything else were explained en detail already. MB versus MiB etc pp.
    *** Now that you have read me, do some other things. ***
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    Of course he means Mebibyte (MiB), but it's a common error to call it Megabyte (MB) nevertheless. All Windows operating systems do it. So with that in mind, it's confusing, and still wrong, yet common.

    Originally Posted by givens View Post
    And it seems your calculator is broken, as this should be 4482.
    It's 4482.625 MiB to be precise, I guess he just rounded it up to 4483.

    2,295,104 sectors on a DVD+R, 2048 Bytes each = 4482.625 MiB.

    Originally Posted by givens View Post
    In practice, it's a whole lot less because of file system headers (=overhead).
    You are wrong. You can put exactly 4482.625 MiB of user data on a DVD+R. I have done it before, I once put 4482.5 MiB on a DVD+R, so there was only 128 KiB of space left. No problem by the way with quality MCC 004 (made in Taiwan or UAE) media.
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  12. Mod Neophyte Super Moderator redwudz's Avatar
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    Just to add, if you are curious about optical media capacities, just look to the upper left on this page for 'WHAT IS' Blu-ray, DVD, and you can see the capacities, structure and formats of each type of optical disc.

    I started using Verbatim BDR discs for data backup some time ago. Per gigabyte, they are cheaper than DVD DL media. I have used some Verbatim BDR DL Japanese branded media that I found on line and it also works very well with my Pioneer burners. I only use ImgBurn to burn my optical media.

    And welcome to our forums.
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