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  1. Hi. when I edit video the preview screen is fine and the raw video format is perfect, however when I render the video
    fast motion shots appear blurry.

    I record my footage using 60 to 100 frames per second, however when I render it to 60 frames per second it still looks blurry.
    What settings should I have it on exactly to render?

    If I record using 30 frames per second, a lot of the indoor lights in Asia causes an unwanted strobing effect.
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  2. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Camera model? 60-to-100fps? Interlaced/Progressive? Version of Vegas?

    More info, please!

    Scott
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  3. I don't use Vegas but I know it's default is blend frames when changing frame rate. Turn off that feature. You'll get simple decimation or duplication instead (no blurring). This, I think:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HPdxulwaKDs
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  4. im using a canon hv30.
    Sony vegas movie studio 10

    I dont know anything about interlaced or progressive. Though, whenever I adjust it to progressive the video gets even more blurry.

    Only fast motion shots are blurry.
    Could this be because I am recording it in such a high frame rate and then editing it back down to 30 frames per second ( pretty much as high as my computer will allow for longer clips)?

    i tried the resample tip already, and i can honestly say i don't see a big difference. The original raw clip is so much smoother for whatever reasons.
    Can anyone help me with the proper settings?
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  5. If I can only render to 30 fps, should I only record at 30 fps? The problem with this is that lighting here causes strobing effects that never happened in America.
    I have to increase the frame rate so my footage doesn't strobe under indoor lighting. Plus, a lot of shots are fast motion shots of vehicles or motorcycles.
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  6. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    the only choices you have with a hv30 are 30i, 30p, or 24pf. there is no 60-100 frames per second.
    --
    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
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  7. You're confusing framerate and shutter speed. They are not the same. Your framerate is always 29.97 NTSC Your shutter speed is adjustable on that camera. so if your shutter speed is 1/100 it is 1/100 each 1/30 of a second, not 100 times a second.
    Last edited by smrpix; 5th Feb 2013 at 19:58.
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  8. Member budwzr's Avatar
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    I don't think camcorders have shutter speed control, and that's a "DV" model (old).

    The problem is plain old 50Hz vs. 60Hz, probably.
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  9. HV30 was one of the first good consumer HDV cameras. It actually does have shutter speed control.

    It's a good way to solve the 50/60 issue you mention, and I'm guessing that's how OP got himself confused.
    Last edited by smrpix; 5th Feb 2013 at 21:24.
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  10. Ahhh I see..


    What should I record in for faster motion shots? i or p?

    Does recording at a higher shutter speed affect anything negatively? It seems to make fast motions come out much better, however,the final rendering product still sucks. The preview screen is okay though and previews just fine. There are a lot of settings at the rendering preferences and I'm not sure what I should adjust.
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  11. Originally Posted by yogurtpooh View Post
    i tried the resample tip already, and i can honestly say i don't see a big difference.
    It's likely you have an interlace problem then. Each frame of interlaced video contains two half pictures, called fields. One field is in all the even numbered scan lines, one in all the odd numbered scan lines. They are intended to be viewed separately and sequentially. So 30 frames per second interlaced video is supposed to be viewed as 60 fields per second. That gives smoother motion at the cost of reduced resolution. You are probably blending the two fields together resulting in images that look like double exposures when there is lots of motion. It's best to leave interlaced video interlaced. But sometimes you want to deinterlace -- for example when uploading to Youtube.
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  12. how do i deinterlace it?
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  13. In the file => project settings, change the deinterlace method to "interpolate" instead of "blend" . Blend will apply a blend deinterlace (blurry). In the render settings, whenever you render a progressive format, but the project settings and video are interlaced, vegas will apply a deinterlace
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  14. Also make sure your project settings match your source footage, it should look something like this.

    Click image for larger version

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    If you're laying back to tape there's no need to deinterlace. If your goal is YouTube, follow poisondeathray's advice.

    When you shoot, a faster shutter speed records a tighter slice of time for each frame. This both reduces motion blur and decreases exposure -- necessitating more light to shoot.

    A good example of the use of fast shutter is the opening sequence of "Saving Private Ryan."
    Last edited by smrpix; 6th Feb 2013 at 00:02.
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  15. Member budwzr's Avatar
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    If your problem is related to interlace, that's one issue.

    If it's "judder", that's another issue.

    If it's electrical frequency, that's yet another issue.

    If it's all three, you're hosed
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  16. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    BTW, there's no reason in the session & render/export settings that "Full resolution rendering quality" should anything less than "Best" (or whatever it calls it) unless doing a quick-n-dirty comp test. That could also have affected your outcome.

    Scott
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  17. thank you so much. it was a deinterlace issue after all. Thank you, now my videos wont look so bad anymore.

    Should the field order be left at upper field first?

    and what is CBR in the MODE, should I just leave it a that?
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  18. Member budwzr's Avatar
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    Jagabo is right again! WTF
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  19. Originally Posted by yogurtpooh View Post
    Should the field order be left at upper field first?
    If you're deinterlacing with Vegas' crappy deinterlacers, it doesn't matter. If you are encoding interlaced the field order needs to match your source.

    Originally Posted by yogurtpooh View Post
    and what is CBR in the MODE, should I just leave it a that?
    You almost never want CBR. Use 2-pass VBR. I don't know if Vegas has it, but constant quality encoding is best if you don't have playback restrictions.
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