VideoHelp Forum


Try DVDFab Video Downloader and rip Netflix video! Or Try DVDFab and copy Blu-rays! or rip iTunes movies!
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7
Thread
  1. Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Canada
    Search Comp PM
    Number of B frames and reference frames. And ME algorithm and subpixel refinement
    What do these settings make in meGUI? !!! I need brief explanation !!
    Quote Quote  
  2. Member DB83's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Search Comp PM
    Nothing to do with DVD ripping. A rip is just a pure copy of what is no the disk.

    A conplete digital frame is called a I-frame. That contains all the data of the frame

    A B-frame just records the changes from the last I-frame

    A P-frame just records the changes that will be made before the next I-Frame

    That is a simplification.
    Quote Quote  
  3. Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by Kaavalan View Post
    ... I need brief explanation !!
    Many noobs here wants a dead simple explanation for a complex process. Good luck.

    Digital video is very hardware dependent. It just can't be simplified all that much. You can't add enough layers of abstraction.

    The other thing is that those codecs and their encoding parameters were not designed for noobs to copy their discs. They are professional standards, written for peers. Those people are more

    Frankly, if you don't even know what an I-frame is, IMO you probably shouldn't use meGui yet. Better to stick to handbrake/vidcoder until you can understand some of the advanced options.
    Quote Quote  
  4. There's an explanation of the various x264 settings here: http://mewiki.project357.com/wiki/X264_Settings Or if you hover the mouse over one of the settings in MeGUI's encoder configuration, it'll often pop up with a tooltip offering a brief explanation of what the setting does.

    My advice would be to leave the "advanced" settings alone unless you really know what you're doing. Instead, use the slider to pick an x264 speed preset. x264 uses different advanced settings according to the speed preset you choose. For instance by default, when using the Medium speed preset the M.E. Algorithm is Hexagon. If you change the speed preset to slow and look again, you'll see the M.E. Algorithm has changed to Multi Hex. The speed presets are basically different configurations of x264's advanced options which the x264 developers designed to offer a good balance of speed and compression etc. The default Medium preset is fine. If you're using CRF encoding, slower presets should produce smaller file sizes but encoding speed will slow. If you're using 2 pass encoding and aiming for a particular file size, slower presets can increase the quality.
    Using the Tuning option also changes some x264 settings in the encoder configuration accordingly. For instance selecting Tune Film will change the deblock settings to -1, as that's what the x264 Tune Film preset does.

    Handbrake doesn't give you access to x264's speed presets or a way to change the x264 Tuning via it's GUI, so ironically in that respect it requires a better knowledge of x264's advanced options. I think Vidcoder does, but it doesn't change x264's advanced settings accordingly in it's GUI, so it leaves you guessing. Neither Handbrake or Vidcoder have an option to load x264's default settings as MeGUI does, instead they load their own x264 defaults. Personally I think MeGUI is a good program to be using for learning in some respects, as it doesn't do things differently to the norm like some programs do.... and it's better than using a program which makes you guess at wtf it's doing. The way I look at it, that hinders learning.....

    PS If you change an x264 advanced option, MeGUI will add it to the command line area accordingly. If you change an x264 advanced option and it's command line entry disappears, then you've changed it to it's default setting. Don't forget though, the default setting for some x264 options change according to the speed preset/tuning you select.
    Last edited by hello_hello; 23rd Dec 2012 at 10:19.
    Quote Quote  
  5. Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Canada
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by hello_hello View Post
    There's an explanation of the various x264 settings here: http://mewiki.project357.com/wiki/X264_Settings Or if you hover the mouse over one of the settings in MeGUI's encoder configuration, it'll often pop up with a tooltip offering a brief explanation of what the setting does.

    My advice would be to leave the "advanced" settings alone unless you really know what you're doing. Instead, use the slider to pick an x264 speed preset. x264 uses different advanced settings according to the speed preset you choose. For instance by default, when using the Medium speed preset the M.E. Algorithm is Hexagon. If you change the speed preset to slow and look again, you'll see the M.E. Algorithm has changed to Multi Hex. The speed presets are basically different configurations of x264's advanced options which the x264 developers designed to offer a good balance of speed and compression etc. The default Medium preset is fine. If you're using CRF encoding, slower presets should produce smaller file sizes but encoding speed will slow. If you're using 2 pass encoding and aiming for a particular file size, slower presets can increase the quality.
    Using the Tuning option also changes some x264 settings in the encoder configuration accordingly. For instance selecting Tune Film will change the deblock settings to -1, as that's what the x264 Tune Film preset does.

    Handbrake doesn't give you access to x264's speed presets or a way to change the x264 Tuning via it's GUI, so ironically in that respect it requires a better knowledge of x264's advanced options. I think Vidcoder does, but it doesn't change x264's advanced settings accordingly in it's GUI, so it leaves you guessing. Neither Handbrake or Vidcoder have an option to load x264's default settings as MeGUI does, instead they load their own x264 defaults. Personally I think MeGUI is a good program to be using for learning in some respects, as it doesn't do things differently to the norm like some programs do.... and it's better than using a program which makes you guess at wtf it's doing. The way I look at it, that hinders learning.....

    PS If you change an x264 advanced option, MeGUI will add it to the command line area accordingly. If you change an x264 advanced option and it's command line entry disappears, then you've changed it to it's default setting. Don't forget though, the default setting for some x264 options change according to the speed preset/tuning you select.
    Thanks for your quick reply. I'll give a try
    Quote Quote  
  6. Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Canada
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by Hoser Rob View Post
    Originally Posted by Kaavalan View Post
    ... I need brief explanation !!
    Many noobs here wants a dead simple explanation for a complex process. Good luck.

    Digital video is very hardware dependent. It just can't be simplified all that much. You can't add enough layers of abstraction.

    The other thing is that those codecs and their encoding parameters were not designed for noobs to copy their discs. They are professional standards, written for peers. Those people are more

    Frankly, if you don't even know what an I-frame is, IMO you probably shouldn't use meGui yet. Better to stick to handbrake/vidcoder until you can understand some of the advanced options.
    Thanks for your quick reply dude.
    Quote Quote  
  7. Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Canada
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by DB83 View Post
    Nothing to do with DVD ripping. A rip is just a pure copy of what is no the disk.

    A conplete digital frame is called a I-frame. That contains all the data of the frame

    A B-frame just records the changes from the last I-frame

    A P-frame just records the changes that will be made before the next I-Frame

    That is a simplification.
    Thanks for your quick reply.
    Quote Quote  



Similar Threads