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  1. hello guys,

    I'm currently asking myself which container, codecs respectively are supporting frame accurate timestamps.
    I know that in AVI-Files this information is available, which allows you to jump to certain frame at time x. But what's about mov-files, for example? If I remember correctly this is related to the Codes as well. I think mpeg2 and mpeg4 are not supporting this properties at all, right? Does somebody know it by heart or even better can somebody of you sent me a link where this kind of features are listed?

    Thank you in advance
    greg
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  2. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    ALL containers & ALL codecs. Otherwise, they wouldn't play correctly.

    Jumping to a frame in fast forward usually has to do with GOP length and how the player(s) is set up to handle GOPs, not about timestamps.

    Scott
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  3. Hi Scott,

    thank you for the quick replay. I think I should try to give you a broader overview, why I'm really interested in timecodes:

    I have several video stream from several synchronised cameras which I would like to save. For a later analysis I need to jump to a specific frame in each of these videos. To do this I thinking to use the timecode.
    As far as I understood it correctly, that what I'm looking for is the "burnt in timecode" (BITC) which is keyed into each frame content, right?
    The normal timecode is keyed in the header of GOP, which will allow me to do a kind of estimation, right?
    The general question is, does only AVI or other video container, like MOV allow BITC?
    It this feature related to the codec I'm using, as well? Which codecs are supporting BITC?

    cheers
    greg
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    It seems you think timeCODES and timeSTAMPS are the same thing, however they aren't.
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  5. Hi El Heggunte,

    if I understand it correctly, the burnt in timeCODE is the generation time of the frame which is keyed into each one separately. Where is the difference to a timeSTAMP?

    However is not my particular question.
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  6. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timecode
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timestamp

    Quicktime can contain a timecode track but on a consumer level usually doesn't.
    Last edited by smrpix; 7th Nov 2012 at 12:24.
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    The difference is very important, especially in order to avoid misunderstandings.

    The AVI container itself for example, has NO timestamps at all, the AVI container deals only with fixed *frame rates*. Modern APIs, differently from the outdated Video-for-Windows thing, make the AVI splitter(s) generate appropriate timestamps required for playback and seeking. Besides, there exist two types of timestamps --- presentation timestamps and decoder timestamps. Containers like MKV and MP4 use presentation timestamps, whereas MPG and TS, which don't have a global header, use decoder timestamps.

    So if you want to receive an answer about timecodes, please ask about timecodes, not about timestamps.
    Last edited by El Heggunte; 7th Nov 2012 at 13:07.
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  8. ..(edited for irrelevance)
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  9. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    BTW, there is no such thing as BITC. There is such a thing as VITC (Vertical Interval Timecode) which exists on Analog Tapes (and in an equivalent form in the Digital World with tapes & discs). The vertical interval is the section of the TV signal which is not seen but contains the sync signals and can also contain other control signals such as VITC, CC or Macrovision.

    There is also the term "Window Burn" when time code is "burned" into a window on the image itself. Equivalent to "hard-coded subs", this is mainly useful for allowing editors to create a rough copy of an edit and pass along to a non-editor who views it and makes comments about changes that may need to be made - according to those listed/visible timecodes.

    Scott

    You know, it would be alot easier if you just TOLD us what you were ultimately trying to accomplish...
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