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  1. Hello,
    I had ripped several blu-rays with Xilisoft with no issues, but then tried Grand Illusion which is on Lionsgate and had problems copying it. I tried it also with DVDFab and had the same problem. It tries to read it and takes a while but then finishes without success. The same problem happened with Manchurian Candidate (2004) on Paramount. I thought a windows update had caused this and then uninstalled and reinstalled Xilisoft and still had issues with Grand Illusion. But then I tried Clockwork Orange on Warner and it worked fine.

    Do some labels have different copy protection? Is there a way around this? I use grabs for professional purposes so the blu-rays have been great (I rip the movie using Xilisoft and then use VLC to make grabs from the file). Any advice would be appreciated!
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  2. The other option is anydvdhd
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  3. Thanks. I had tried it before as a trial but then uninstalled it and went with Xilisoft - but then when I tried to use anydvd again after i was having issues it said my 21 day trial expired... would anydvd be better and break the protection? i am concerned i will still have the same issue.
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  4. anydvdhd is the most reliable for blu-ray

    but it might take a few days after a new release before it gets updated

    if you're having an issue with a specific title , you can ask in their forum and they will release an update to address the problem

    to answer your original question - yes, studios are always changing copy protection schemes - that's why it's you need constant updates for new releases
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  5. Banned
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    Originally Posted by dejm1 View Post
    Do some labels have different copy protection?
    They do, but note that "different" = "costs the producer more money" and some studios won't deviate from the standard protection methods. Other studios will pay the extra costs for supposed "extra protection" against rippers. It's rare for films that were made outside of the USA/Canada to have such protection methods, but I have heard of it being done. For example, I recall reading about some Czech horror film that I think was only released on DVD or BluRay in the Czech Republic and nowhere else and the company that released it used Cinavia on it.

    Different copy protection for DVDs involved some variation on having deliberate bad sectors on the disc. The disc TOC (Table of Contents) may have been deliberately corrupted too. I do not claim to be an expert on the in and outs of this. I just know a general overview of the concept with no specifics. For DVDs, Sony and Disney are the most likely to use this method. The Sony method is known as ARCCOS and it costs money to use it via a 3rd party program. Disney wrote their own ARCCOS-like program in house for DVDs. Most major studios in the USA did not use this for DVDs and relied on the default encryption methods that only stop inexperienced users. The bad sector methods exploit a difference in how standalone DVD player firmware works and how old sector by sector ripping programs like DVD Decrypter work in allowing the DVD to play fine from disc but be useless as a ripped file unless a special ripping program was used that could deal with the bad sectors and remove them and produce a valid TOC. The bad sector copy protection was specifically designed to defeat the DVD Decrypter ripping program. DVD Decrypter hasn't been updated in years and does not understand bad sector copy protection. It's a long story but the author was given an "offer he couldn't refuse" that if he abandoned the program permanently, he would no longer face the possibility of a ruinous US lawsuit. It's worth noting at the time this deal was made that EVERY DVD decryption based court case in the USA was found in favor of Hollywood and at least one company was literally sued out of existence over this.

    As far as I can tell BluRay does not use bad sector copy protection. However, paranoid Sony, always continuing down their "ALL customers are thieves!" path now pays for a new type of copy protection on all BluRays and some DVDs called Cinavia. Cinavia uses an audio watermark in the soundtrack that is well beyond the range of human hearing but can be detected by special software. BluRay players can be firmware updated to support Cinavia detection. Since currently nobody has found a way to remove Cinavia, any BD player with Cinavia detecting firmware will refuse to play a Cinavia protected ripped disc after a few minutes of play. Even if you convert the rip to another format like MKV the player may still refuse to play protected files. I cannot state this with 100% certainty, but I do not think Disney uses Cinavia. However, some studios that refused to use bad sector copy protection on DVDs are now jumping on the Cinavia band wagon for BD protection. Paramount is one such studio. Even if you rip a Cinavia disc, make no changes and burn it to BD media, the player knows that you are playing consumer burnable media and if a player that recognizes Cinavia finds it on your burn, it will stop playing the disc after a few minutes. It has been found that completely replacing the audio track with a non-HD version that is free of Cinavia (ie. lifting an AC3 track from a DVD of the same movie where the DVD does not use Cinavia) will defeat the Cinavia detection.

    The main reason for this long post is to warn you that Cinavia is supposed to be supported by ALL BD players in the near future. I've read conflicting statements about whether this support is mandatory or optional, but you need to be aware that BD rips you make today that contain Cinavia protection possibly may not play on future BD players. The geniuses that figured out how to crack supposedly "uncrackable" BD encryption have been completely stumped by this. My guess is that a solution in the future is going to require a program to completely re-encode the audio to remove Cinavia's audio watermark. If I am right, the purists are going to flip out because they know that a re-encoding will be at least marginally inferior to the original version.
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  6. Thanks for the in-depth reply. It is someone else's blu-ray so hopefully it won't self destruct when I give it back to him. So the way it seems, it might just be hit or miss which blu-rays will work with our Xilisoft software. I wish I knew for sure which program will work with ALL blu-rays but I guess there is no way to guarantee it in an ever-changing market. If anyone has a suggestion - if more people suggest AnyDVD I might give it a shot. It can be frustrating since it's work/client related...
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  7. Banned
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    DVDFab:
    Pro: More regularly updated.

    Con: Company nickel and dimes you to death. You may buy one version of DVDFab only to find out later that you have to pay extra to get what you really wanted in the first place.

    AnyDVD:
    Pro: Pricing structure much simpler. You buy "lifetime updates" and that is exactly what you get. Chance of not buying the right version in the beginning is extremely low.

    Con: Not updated as often, which leads to periodic freakouts on various video forums like ours that "AnyDVD is out of business!". They also had a brief website issue where payments didn't work and that led to more "they're going out of business!" speculation that was untrue.

    I use AnyDVD.

    Note that no ripping program is currently capable of removing Cinavia. Just want to be clear about that.
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  8. If it's work/client related, I assume you have permission to use the blu-ray material ? This wouldn't fall under "fair use" in North America

    And if the client is the studio, you should have access to the master, much better quality...
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