VideoHelp Forum

Our website is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors.
Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker or buy PlayOn (record Netflix) :)
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9
Thread
  1. Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Philippines
    Search PM
    aside from yadif because the video lags when i do that..i guess my cpu cant handle that..thank you
    Quote Quote  
  2. Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Search Comp PM
    There isn't really a 'best' deinterlace mode. Deinterlacing isn't just one thing, hence a bunch of options. You really need to try different modes to get best results.

    I usually just use vlc for audio, unless smplayer can't open a video file, which has only happened once while it'll play lots of things vlc won't. So I'm a little rusty on vlc video settings, but ...

    My first impulse would be to look at the priority and cache settings. Smplayer has a realtime priority setting but that can cause problems potentially. Never had a problem myself though. I don't think vlc has realtime. But high priority can make a huge difference with h.264 video. Set the priority as high as possible.

    Unfortunately vlc 2.0 doesn't have file cache adjustment anymore ... a serious problem IMO. I set the file stream cache in smplayer to 8192Kb. This isn't an issue for me with vlc because I really just use it for my flac cd rips. But dropping file cache settings was really stupid.

    The truth is, though, on my 4Gb i3 laptop with intel integrated HD graphics, which is a middle of the road machine, I simply can't get vlc to play h.264 nearly as smoothly as smplayer. Smplayer will play 1080p video on it perfectly if it was encoded properly.

    Another thing you could try if you're doing your own h.264 encodes is turning off CABAC in the advanced settings. h.264 video with cabac is like a zip file. CABAC increases file compression significantly. It also significantly increases CPU load when you play the file. The player has to unzip the file in real time.
    Quote Quote  
  3. If you can't get Yadif2x to play smoothly, bob is the second best choice for smooth motion. It's also very close to what an old CRT would do.
    Quote Quote  
  4. Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Search Comp PM
    I'm sure jagabo's right on that. I find it's just easier and quicker to try different filters (one at a time to avoid forgetting what the hell you did) and see what looks better.
    Quote Quote  
  5. Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Philippines
    Search PM
    okay thankyou for the replies..so bob is the second best chioce if i dont want the video to lose too much of its original resolution..
    Quote Quote  
  6. Originally Posted by vincy View Post
    okay thankyou for the replies..so bob is the second best chioce if i dont want the video to lose too much of its original resolution..
    It's not that simple. Some methods work better for some material, some with other material. Interlaced video contains two half-pictures, called fields, in each frame. One picture is in all the even numbered scanlines, the other in all the odd numbered scanlines. If nothing is moving the two half-pictures can be displayed together as a frame with full spacial resolution. But when things are moving it gets much more complex.

    Bob is a compromise that's fast and keeps full motion resolution but sacrifices some spacial resolution. It can flicker a bit and small sharp text (or other objects) will appear to bounce up and down. Yadif attempts to keep full spacial resolution in non moving parts of the picture (thus avoiding flicker and bounce) but sacrifices motion resolution. Yadif2x tries to keep full motion resolution in parts of the picture that are moving and full spacial resolution in parts of the picture that are still. But it takes a lot more processing power. And both Yadif methods can generate odd artifacts. Blend blurs the two pictures together losing both spacial resolution and temporal resolution. It looks ok when the picture is still but can look like double exposures when things are moving.
    Quote Quote  
  7. Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Philippines
    Search PM
    alright..thank you jagobo..so if my cpu cant handle yadif..ill just try things out and choose whats good with my eyes..thanks
    Quote Quote  
  8. Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Oregon, USA
    Search Comp PM
    On my new and old computer, in VLC 2.x for whatever reason, Yadif 2x lags/is choppy like crazy on it, despite low CPU usage.

    I have no problems on either system with VLC 1.1.11 though. I don't know if this is a settings issue or a weird bug, but if your computer is not more than 5 or 6 years old, you might try an older version of VLC and see if Yadif 2x works for you.

    I typically use Yadif 2X for most of my VHS to DVD conversions when I watch them on the computer, more than anything because it approximates the motion look I want. I do see odd artifacts as well from time to time, but I'll take the good looking motion above all else.
    Quote Quote  
  9. Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Search Comp PM
    I find Linear is the best when Yadiff 2x is choppy. I think it separates the fields and linearly interpolates them, thus keeping full motion smoothness, like bob, but with higher spatial quality and no bobbing up and down that I've noticed, and I've not had any problems with it playing high bitrate 1920x1080 interlaced on a laptop that's more than four years old.

    FYI - when encoding interlaced content myself (eg DVD, BluRay) I use HandBrake's "bob" decomb setting and set double the framerate (ie, set the output framerate to the field rate), which I think actually produces Yadif 2x whenever there is motion (combing detected). That way I get a non-interlaced (progressive) output that plays smoothly and is only something like 15% bigger than if I had discarded every second frame (for a given "quality" setting (Constant Rate Factor)). (x264 is smart enough to know it can automatically compress more at higher framerates.)
    Last edited by as264; 15th Mar 2014 at 18:44.
    Quote Quote  



Similar Threads