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  1. Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Search Comp PM
    Bottom line - is it a problem to combine video shot at different video resolutions, scan types and frame rates into a movie on Blu-ray disc using Premiere Elements 9?
    I have 2 video cameras I will be using on my vacation. One is a Sony HDR-PJ260V and the other a Kodak PlaySport, just for shots around water and underwater. With the Sony, I will be shooting in 1080/60p or 1080/60i. With the Kodak, I can shoot in 1080/30p or 720/60p. Can I combine any of these video options from the 2 cameras on one disc when making a movie on Blu-ray disc? Is there a best choice here? Is there any advantage to shooting in "p" versus "i"?
    And last question, if I opt to also make a movie for DVD, too, what should I do or not do when selecting resolution, scan type and frame rate?
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  2. Youre limited on resolutions and frames rates for BD. Look at the upper left and click on "what is Blu Ray"
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  3. Banned
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Freedonia
    Search Comp PM
    You can actually combine resolutions on BD. Many commercial studio discs do this all the time. I think I've seen a few Battlestar Galactica BD discs that use 480i, 720p and 1080p on the same disc. I've definitely seen 480i/p and 1080p together. I have no idea if Premiere Elements will let you do this or not, but it's legal.

    However, do note that 1080 at 60 fps, whether interlaced or progressive, is NOT legal for BD. I would think that you would want to shoot progressive whenever possible as long as the camera is capable of doing it without quality loss. Interlaced frames have half the information that progressive frames do. Interlaced is basically old technology dating back to the early days of TV. It exists for 1080 video because various standards groups incorrectly guessed that video technology would progress at a much slower rate than it actually did and 1080i was considered the limits of video technology at the time with 1080p being something of a dream for the future. And nobody thought that 1080 video at 60 fps would be possible as quickly as it actually was.
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